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REESE LIBRAHV 



11 47 0113732 4 



LIBRARY 
AUGUSTA COLLEGE 




^'Bf^PV USE ONLY 









04 c- f ^^ 

193 f- io 



\SSm USE ONLY 



REESE LIBRARY 

Augusta College 
Augusta, Georgia 





PRINTED IN U,S A. 



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I 



"The 1940 




99 



FOREWORD 




This year our annual is a symbol of the 
enthusiastic spirit shown by the entire student 
body in making this yearbook possible. If this 
book serves to inspire us to greater achievements 
and to arouse the spirit of those students who will 
succeed us; if in later years it enables us to recall 
memories which will renew love and devotion to 
our Alma Mater, our efforts in trying to preserve 
the "atmosphere" of our campus life by compiling 
the activities of this year will be rewarded. 

May it justify the hope of those who have 
toiled in its making — 



CONTENTS 

Administration 
Classes 
Military 
Athletics 
Features 

. Activities 
Snaps and Ads 



To Elnora Mertins and Eliza- 
beth Lee, who have merited the 
sincere admiration of the facul- 
ty and students alike; whose 
loyalty, integrity, and friendli- 
ness fully exemplify the spirit 
of these institutions; who have 
been untiring in cooperation, 
and efficient in service, we dedi- 
cate this our annual for 1940. 




Miss Elizabeth Lee 
Secretary 



DEDICATION 




THE 

Editors 

SAY. . . 

We've worked together, 
We've worked apart, 
This annual to release. 
We've fussed and fumed. 
We smiled and said, 
"The labor shall not cease." 
We've done our job. 
Now you do yours — 
Just praise this to the summit. 
And if you say this book's no good- 
Well, if you don't like it — 
Lump it! 




/ 




^ 



The main entrance of our 
15-yeai--old building is one of 
popularity as well as of beauty. 




IE 



President 



THE IDEALIST 

' highest privilege of the teacher is to oyjen to 
some new vista of opportunity and to lead them 
"d to some new height of outlook and greater 
:h of vision. The heart of the challenge I would 
to you is that you should recall idealism to its 
al and lofty purpose in your living and feel in 
filire of 3-otir being its commandng solicitation. 

n age when so much emphasis is put upon the 
;al and utilitarian values of life, idealism has 
•pearance of remoteness and intangibility and 
ity. Still you must know that it is precisely this 
;nt inaccessibility that gives to idealism its 
nge to the spirit of youth. It is like the inac- 
ility of a rugged mountain peak, which pro- 
the desire to climli. As one laboriously ascends, 
;ntly with tired muscles and aching limbs, and 
with the knowledge that we may never Cjuite 
its summit, we are still exultant in spirit for we 
the great world at our feet. \\'hat seemed a 
ngless tangle as seen from below gets perspec- 
nd meaning when seen from above. Thus the 
r view and broader horizon Isecome the reward 
; idealist. 

d so, fellow-students. I call upon you to make 
scent of Life, remembering that whether you 
it toward Beauty, or Truth, or Goodness, the 
succession of steps is taken and the same 
/eness is disclosed. For the student, whatever 
<ecial interest — whether it be Science, or Art, or 
ature, or Morals — he is in every case solicited 
1 unsealed height. 

u should remember that there are moral condi- 
of scholarly achievement. A scholar must be not 
creative, but sincere. An undefiled character 
you not only a finer morality, hut a finer in- 
Your eyes are clear because your heart is pure, 
shall it come to be with you as it is written in the 
of Books — "Tlie Pure in heart shall see God." 
tRIC W. HARDY, President. 



Administrative Heads 
at Work 




THE DEAN ^ jj^ 



I have been asked to write a brief message to you; 
but, because there are so many good things in life I want 
each of you to have, I find it difficult to formulate a 
message that will convey all m\- desires for you. In short, 
I shall simply wish for each of you happiness and success 
in your lives as you leave school. 

To achieve happiness and success, you must remem- 
ber that these attributes are not to be measured alone by 
the mere acquisition of material wealth and possessions. 
The man who places such homely, sterling virtues as 
character, honesty, perseverance, industry and thrift, 
and last, but not least, reverence to God, foremost in his 
life will be richly rewarded. The world now has a great 
and crying need for men and women of character, devoted 
to the service of their country and of their fellow men. 
The hope and salvation of our country lie in the hands of 
our youth ; it is your privilege to lead onward and upward. 

It is my hope that you may happily combine the 
idealistic and the materialistic aspects of life, and achieve 
that measure of success and happiness that is your due. 

A. P, MARKERT, Dean. 




Anton Paul Markert, B.S., M.A. 
Dean 




A Faculty Appreciation 

In the dedication of this Yearbook, the student 
body has given its testimonial of love and respect 
for the two- grand ladies whO' have served them so 
beautifully and efficiently in our offices. 

No people appreciate them more deeply or hold 
them in greater affection than the members of the 
faculties of the Academy of Richmond County and 
the Junior College of Augusta. As the spokesman of 
the faculties, I respectfully dedicate the following 
simple lines to Miss Elenora Mertins and Miss 
Elizabeth Lee. 

Just you, with each day's new dawning, 
Just you, with each morning's good cheer. 
Just you, who lighten our burdens, 
Just you, SO' happy and near. 

Just you, when our hearts grow heavy. 
Just you, when we're lonely or sad. 
Just you, when all others have failed us. 
Just you, when the world's gone mad. 

Just you, how patient and kindly. 
Just you, the fairest and best. 
Just you, true friends, and so loyal, 
Just you, with your life and your zest. 

Just you, how tenderly we cherish. 
So lovely, so brave, and so true — 
We pour out our daily libations. 
And thank God for the twO' — just you. 

— E. W. Hardy 



ff^^sfykn 




4 t f 1 f m 9 





BOARD OF EDUCATION 



Seated From Left to Right: H. L. Murphe}'. T. M. Nickles, Mrs. H. T. Farris. Mrs. B. E. Lester, Thomas J. Fender, 
Mrs. W. K. Elliott, Mrs. J. T. Mulligan, \V. A. Watkins, S. D. Copeland. 

Standing From Left to Right: J. G. McDonald, E. H. Hutchcson, L. E. Harrif, Jas. T. Plunkett, James Harhin, \V. R. 
Brigham, Gene Greneker (Herald Reporter). R. J. Beattie, William P. Congdon, \V. F. Burton, Webster Robinson, 
J. C. Broome, F. M. Kelley. 

Not in Picture: Bert Reed, Claude C. Sconyers, Mrs. John W. Walkr. 



J. G. McDonald, Ph.B., C.P.A. 

Business Manager of the Board, 1937-4U. 
Instructor at A. R. C. 1920-1937. Founder ot 
the Augusta Optimist Club. 




Thomas J. Fender 

President of the Board of Education. (When 
elected fcur years ago, the youngest president 
of a Board in the U. S.). Alumnus of Academy 
of Riclimond Count}'. Assistant Manager of 
Augusta Water Works Dept. Member of the 
Chamber of Commerce. 32° Scottish" Rite 
Mason. Member Alee Shrine Elks. 



T. M. Nickles 

Vice-President of the Board. Cashier of The 
Farmer's Bank of Blythe. Member of the 
Kiwanis Club. Banker, Farmer, Operator of 
Gin, Insurance Agent, and various other 
activities. (Even a golfer). 





S. D. Copeland 

Superintendent of Education of Richmond 
County 1934. Assistant Superintendent 1937. 
Principal of Houghton 1920. Richmond Aca- 
demy 1917. Secretary of the Board of Educa- 
tion. Member of Kiwanis Club. Horace Mann 
League, Ninety-six Club, National Education 
Association. President of the Young Men's 
Library Association; Vice-President of the 
Board of Trustees of the Character Chest. 



w^ ^ 



) 




BAILIE 



BOLTON 



1^ 



THE 



Ernest Mason Allen, Ph.B., M.A. 
English and French 



A. Edwin Anderson, A.B., A.M. 
English and German 



Margaret Bailie, B.S., A.B.inL.S. 
Librarian 



George Langston Bolton, B.S. 
Mathematics 



Allen 


Anderson 


Cordle 


Dasher 


Davis 


DeNoia 


Derrick 


' DuPuis 


Maj. Elliott 


Ellis 




BRYSON 



BUCKNER 



CARSON 



CHANDLER 



FACULTY 



Marion Turner Bryson, A.B. 


Charles Guy Cordle, A.B., A.M. 


Jasper Otto Derrick, A.B., M.S. 


Science 


History 


Science 


James Morgan Buckner, B.S., M.S. 


George M. Dasher 


Elroy DuPuis, A.B., A.M. 


Mathematics 


Shop 


English 


Grover W. Carson, B. Mus. Ed. 


James Treadwell Davis, B.S., M.A. 


Walter A. Elliott, Major 


Music 


History 


Miliary Science and Tactics 


O'Neal W. Chandler, A.B. 


John DeNoia, A.B., M.A. 


John Marshall Ellis, A.B., M.S. Ph.D. 


Science 


Spanish 


Science 



* » * 



^ 



^ 



^ 




J 



FACULTY 



Charles Martin Etheredge, A.B. 
Mathematics 



John Evans Eubanks, A.B., A.M. 
Latin and Government 



George W. Ewing, B.S. 
Mathematics and Science 



Herman McDonald Felder, A.B., M.A. 
English 



Norman L. Galloway, B.S., M.A. 
Education and Economics 



Luther Alfred Griffin, B.S., M.S. 
Science 



John Thomas Hains, B.S. 
Mathematics 



William E. Hardy, A.B. 
Mathematics and History 



Frank M. Harriss, A.B. 
Enghsh 



■^ 



J. D. Hughey, A.B. 
History and English 





FACULTY 



William Redding Kennedy 



Commercial 



Elizabeth Lee, B. S. 
Secretary 



J. Curtis Luckey, B.S. 
Mathematics 



William Leroy Maden, A.B., M.A. 
French 



William C. McGee, Sergeant 
Military 



Elnora Mertins 
Secretary 



Charles Harold Mitchell, A. B., M.A. 
English 



John Burchell Moore, A.B., A.M. 
History and English 



Joseph Rufus Moseley, B.S., MA. 
Mathematics 



Auburn G. Owens, A.B. 
English and History 



THE 



Henry Osgood Read, Ph.B., M.A. 
English 




ROLLINS 



George H. Ridgway, A.B. 
Science 



Joe Mays Robertson, B.S. 
Mathematics 



Roy E. Rollins, B.A., M.A. 
History and Economics 



Read 

Smith, Norman 

Sutton 

Tem]3leton 

Watkins 



Ridgway 

Sullivan 

Talley 

Truan 

Williams 




) 



i \ 



i\ 

ROYSTON 




SCOTT 



SCRUGGS 



B. ROY SMITH 



FACULTY 



Charles A. Royston, B.S. 
Mathematics 



Xorman C. Smith. B.S. in I.E. 
Drawing 



William E. Templeton, B.A. 
Commercial 



George Milton Scott. A.B., B.Lit., M.A. " William Wendell Sullivan, A.B. 
English History 



C. H. Truan. A.B., A.C.A. 



Commercial 



Chester Arthur Scrug-gs, A.B.,M.A. 
Science 



Chester M. Sutton, A.B. , M.A. 
English 



W. Parmelee Watkins, Ph.B. 

History 



Benjamin Roy Smith, A.B. 

History 



Jo.seph LeConte Talley, B.S., M.S. 
Science 



John Williams 
Vocation Guidance 



*)}!<• 



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^ 




Faculty Resolutions 



NOTE: — The following were found by our snoopervisor on a crumbled piece of paper in the faculty room 
just after the first faculty meeting of the New Year. 

I, Ernest Mason Allen, do resolve to wear dark glasses while teaching my Jimior College French 
classes in order to prevent any unnecessary diversion on the part of the feminine members present. 

I, Margaret Bailie, do resolve not to allow so much necessary whispering in the library and to resort 
to quieter tactics in so doing. 

I, John Marshall Ellis, do resolve never again to quake with fear and timidity because of the girls 
in my classes. From this time forth I shall look them square in the eyes instead of bashfully gazing at 
their feet. Yessir, I'll mow 'em down with stares ! 

I, Eric West Hardy, do resolve not to invite the Board of Education to inspect the institution on 
Washington's Birthday (and incidentally, give them a good dinner in the lunch room) with the sole 
intention of extracting an appropriation from them. , 

I, Joseph R. Moseley, do hereby resolve, hereafter and forevermore, never to leave the subject of 
mathematics while conducting my classes. From this time forth, I will restrain, cease, and absolutely 
quit remarking about and discussing the European situation, my farming problems, domestic luisad- 
ventures, and other peculiar subjects. 

I, Henry Osgood Read, do resolve to remain in m\' home-room after nine o'clock, and to leave the 
management of inane conduct in the corridors to other members of the faculty, in order that one of 
these might acquire my reputation. 

I, George Ridgway, do resolve not to waste any more time teaching school, but rather to spend 
that tiiue resting, sleeping, and eating. 

I, Chester Arthur Scruggs, do resolve that hereafter I shall cease philosophizing, restrain my 
imagination from having such free range, dispense with advancing my impractical theories, and in short, 
try not to mesmerize my students. Rather I shall spend more time on the Essentials of Chemistry. 

I, Chester M. Sutton, do' resolve to require more work of my English classes. I am tired of students 
and faculty memliers' accusing me of ofifering "crip courses." 

I, LeConte Talley, do resolve to cease doling out indefinite and impractical theories to poor, de- 
fenseless Physics students. 



A Stiidenf s Impression 
of the Faculty 

A's the teacher who gave us this book 

B's the librarian with the silencing look 

C's the leader of our promising band 

D teaches the language of a far away land 

E's too handsome to really be true 

F tells the camera club just what to do 

G and his glee club are really a riot 

H thinks the hall should be kept very quiet 

I — for idiots (and there are quite a lot) 

J's a joke by George Milton Scott 

K's "Unkle Bill" who knows all the tricks 

L is the teacher who's known as "Big Six" 

M is our dean and every student's friend 

N is the nothing we've learned in the end 

O's the one with the MUSKETEER 

P's our politics — worse every year 

O's the "big question" on a C.G.C. test 

R's the "Baron" and one of the best 

S knows his chemistry or so it is said 

T is the man with the hair that's so red 

U — for us who make up each class 

V is the victory when all of us pass 

W's for "Sergeant" who makes the boys drill 
X used to be unknown ; I guess it is still 

Y is for no other person than you 

Z's for the zero which means that you're through. 





Connie seems very much 
interested in the Baron. 



Snaps 



Could this diHgent work have 
been real? 



Col. Hains loves his "trigging." 





ti 



President Caver, of the Senior class, 
takes an order for an Academy ring. 
It is tradition with us that the presi- 
dent of the Senior class should have 
complete charge of the ring contracts. 
Tim [Mulligan is closing the transaction. 



L __ 




. 







5P^ 



Jack Hains lonks interestingly at Margaret Shettall, 
while Alfred Battey, Betty Andrews, and Tommy 
Houck seem to be very amused about something. 
Elle Carswell. the vice-president of the "sophisti- 
cated" class was absent, it seems; maybe she was 
just on the opposite side of the car. 



J. V_><. l\. 



The J.C.A. Sophomores had no troulile in 
the selection of their officers for this year's 
group of students. Alfred Battey, presi- 
dent, has steadily risen in popularity 
among the students. Elle Carswell is our 
own little ray of sunshine, cheering us up 
with a congenial word a day. Margaret 
Sheftall is typical of our vim, vigor, and 
vitality ; and she is very much responsible 
for the success of our annual. Tommy 
Houck is a most efficient treasurer. Betty 
Andrews and Jack Hains are our popular 
student council representatives. Inciden- 
tally, Betty was voted the most popular 
J. C. A. girl and Jack, the best all-round 
J. C. A. boy. 




Alfred Battey 
President 




Student Council 
Jack Hains 



Student Council 
I'ettv Andrews 



\'ice-President 
Elle Carswell 



Secretary 
Margaret Sheftall 



Treasurer 
Thomas Houck 



SOPHOMORES 



ALLEN, HAZEL 

Glee Club 1; Basketball 1, 2; Liter- 
ary Society 1, 2; J.C.A. Y.W.C.A. 2. 



ANDREWS, BETTY 

High Honor 1; Sigma Delta Chi 1, 
2; Student Council 2; Phi Theta 
Kappa. 



BAILEY, WILLIAM E. 

Vice-President of Freshman Class; 
Spanish Club 1; Pre-Law Club 1; 
Captain 1; Major 1, 2; Sabre Club 
1, 2; Camera Club 2; Literary So- 
ciety 2. 



BATES, EVELYN 
Glee Club 1,2; Literary Society 2. 



BATTLE, HELEN 

High Honor 1; Winner of Louis L. 
Battey Memorial Medal 1; Glee 
Club 1, 2; Literary Society 1, 2; 
J.C.A. Y.W.C.A. 2; Phi Theta Kappa 



ANDERSON, VIRGINIA 

Radio Dramatic Club 1; J. C. A. 

Y.W.C.A. 2. 



BAILEY, JOANNE 

Literary Society 1, 2; J. C. A. 
Y.W.C.A. 2; Camera Club 2. 



BATES, ANNETTE 

Glee Club 1, 2; Literary Society 2; 
Sponsor 2. 



BATTEY, ALFRED 

Winner of Stunt Night; Secretary ot 
J.C.A. Hi-Y; Student Council 1, 2; 
President, Hangover Club 1,2,; Cap- 
tain 1; Major 2; Sabre Club 1, 2; 
President, Sophomore Class; Mili- 
tary Editor, "Rainbow" 2; President, 
J.C.A. Hi-Y 2; Pre-Law Club 2; 
Rho-Chi 2. 



BEST, KATHRYN 

Honor 1; Spanish Club 1; Life Sav- 
ers 1, 2; J.C.A. Y.W.C.A. 1, 2; 
Caiiicia Club 2. 




The J. C. A. 



BIGNOK. CELESTE 
J. C. A. Y.W.C.A. 1, 2. 



BOITER. ALBERT 



BRACEY, JOHX \^ 

2nd Lieutenant 1; 1st Lieutenant 2; 
Sabre Club 1, 2; Pre-Law 1, 2; 
Treasurer, Pre-Law Club 2. 



BROWN, MARIAN 



BRYANS, ELISABETH 

Annual Staff 1, 2; President of Zeta 
Rho Sigma. 



BLACK, WILLIAM B. 



BOWERS, HOWARD 



Honor 1: Glee Club 2; Literary Pre-Law Club 1. 

Societv. 



BROADWATER. ROBERT 



BROWN, WILLIAM T., JR. 

Higb Honor 1; 2nd Lieutenant 1 
1st Lieutenant 2; Sabre Club 1, 2 
Romanic Pbilological Society 1 
Spanish Club 2; Demolay 1, 2; Scribe 
of Demolay Society 2; Phi Theta 
Kapp; Glee Club 2; Literary Society 
2. 



BUCKLEY, J. L. 

President of Pre-Law Club 2; 
Lieutenant 2; Sabre Club 2. 



1st 





Sophomores 



BYINGTON, WILLIAM 

J.C.A. Hi-Y 1, 2; Treasurer of J.C.A. 

Hi-Y 2; "Musketeer" Staff 1, 2; 
SiJorts Editor of "Musketeer" Staff 
2; Literary Society 2. 



CARPENTER, VIRGINIA 

Junior College Y.W.C.A.; Varsity 
Club; Glee Club: Literary Society. 



CAVE. O'NEAL 

J.C.A. Hi-Y 1; Secretary of J.C.A. 
Hi-Y 2; Basketball Letter 1,2; Sabre 
Club 1, 2; Treasurer of Sabre Club 
2: Varsity Club 1, 2. 



CHAPMAN, SARA JANE 

Jr. College Y. W. C. A. 1, 2; Art 
Editor of "Rainbow" 2; Literary 
Society 1, 2; 



-^DAITCH, IRVIN 

Spanishv Club 1; Literary Society 1; 
Pre-Law Club 1, 2; President of Pre- 
Law Club 1 ; Vice-President of 
Pre- Law Club 2; Captain 1; Major 
2; Lt. Colonel 2; Sabre Club 1, 2; 
Chairman, Sabre Club Dance Com- 
mittee 2; Rifle Team 1, 2; Stage 
Manager, Stunt Night 2. 



CAPERS, MARIAN 

Zeta Rho Sigma 2; Literary Society 
1; Junior College Y.W.C.A. 2. 



CARSWELL, ELLE 

Honor 1; Secretary of Freshman 
Class; Literary Society 1; Junior 
College Y.W.C.A. 1, 2; President 
of Junior College Y.W.C.A. 2; Glee 
Club 1, 2; Sigma Delta Chi 1, 2; 
Vice-President of Sophomore Class. 



CHANDLER, EVELYN 

High Honor 1; Literary Society 1; 
Junior College Y.W.C.A. 1, 2; Zeta 
Rho Sigma. 



COCLIN, MARGARET 

Hi.gh Honor 1 ; Literary Society 1 ; 
Junior College Y.W.C.A.; Phi Theta 
Kappa. 



DEAS, THOMAS 

Camera Club 1, 2; Rho Chi 1, 2; 
\ ice-President Rho Chi 2 



The J. C. A. 



DUNBAR. JANIS 

Highest Honor 1; Treasurer of 
Freshman Class; Zeta Rho Sigma 1; 
Romanic Philological Society 1; Jr. 
College YAV.C.A. 1; Literary Editor 
of "Rainbow" 2; Phi Theta Kappa. 



DUNCAN. JAMES B. 

2nd Lieutenant 1: 1st Lieutenant 1; 
2; Sabre Club 1, 2; Leader of Best 
Drilled Platoon in R.O.T.C. 1; De- 
molay 1, 2. 



] ARR, MAXINE 

Fashion Show 1; Glee Club 1, 2; 
Bowling Team 1, 2; Junior College 
Y.W.C.A. 1, 2; Cheer Leader 1, 2; 
Annual Staff 2; Zeta Rho Sigma 1, 2. 



GOLDSTEIN. MEYER 
Literary Society 1. 



HAINS. J. T. 

Lt. Colonel 1 ; Colonel 1, 2; Sabre 
Club 2; Pres. of Sabre Club I, 2; 
Student Council 1, 2: Pres. of Stu- 
dent Council 1. 2; J.C..\. Hi-Y 1, 2; 
Rifle Team; Hearst Trophy Team 1, 
2; Varsity Club 1. 2; Beta Club 1. 
2- Gold "R" Club. 



DUNBAR, MARY HELEN 

Honor 1 : Literary Society 1 ; Cam- 
era Club 1, 2: Jr. College Y.W.C..^. 
1. 2. 



ELLIOTT. CONSTANCE 

Higli Honor 1; Literary Society 1; 
Business Manager of "Rainbow" 1; 
Glee Club 1, 2; Jr. College Y.W.C.A. 
1, 2; Sigma Delta Chi 1. 2; Presi- 
dent of Sigma Delta Chi 2; Phi 
Theta Kappa. 



(;ERCKE, KATE 



GWIN. THOMAS J. 

Stunt Night Winner 1; J.C..^. Hi-Y 
1. 2; Vice Pres. Hi-Y 1, 2; 1st Lieu- 
tenant 1, 2; Captain 2; Sabre Club 
1. 2; Dance Committee 2; Circula- 
tion Manager of Musketeer 2; Lite 
Savers Club 1, 2; Cheer Leader 2; 
\'arsity Club I; Hangover Club 1, 2; 
Camera Club 2; Rifle Team; Hearst 
Trophy Team 1, 2; Picture Editor 
of "Rainbow" 2. 



HALLINAN, MARY 

Bowling Team 1 ; Literary Society 
1 ; Honor 1. 2; Jr. College Y.W.C.A 
1. 2. 





Sophomores 



HAMMETT, ANNE 

Glee Club 1, 2: Jr. College Y.W.C.A. 
1, 2: Literary Society 1. 2. 



HILL. GEORGE FELTON 

1st Lieutenant 1, 2; Sabre Club 1, 2; 
J.C.A. Hi-Y 1, 2; Drawing Club 1,2; 
Secretary-Treasurer of Drawing 
Club 1. 2. 



HOLLEY, CELESTE 



JACKSON, LLOYD 



JONES, SARA 



HAYNiE, McDonald c. 

Honor 1; Literary Societj' 1, 2; De- 
niolay 1, 2; Pre-Law Club 1, 2. 



mil. II LI. A 1'. 



HOUCK. TOMMY 

Glee Club 1, 2; Pre-Law Club 1, 2; 
Treasurer of Sophomore Class. 



JENNY, FRANCIS 
High Honor 1 ; Phi Theta Kappa. 



KIMBRELL, CHARLES 

Basketball 1. 2; 2nd Lieutenant 1; 
1st Lieutenant 2; Sabre Club 1, 2; 
Varsity Club; J.C.A. Hi-Y 2; Pre- 
Law Club 1. 



The J. C. A. 



KING, HELEN M. 

Junior College Y.W.C.A. 2; Literary 
Society 2; Spanish Club 2. 



LEMOX. V. A. 



MARSH, DOROTHY 

Literary Society 1: Basketball \, 2; 
Jr. College Y.W.C.A. 1, 2; Spanish 
Club 2; Secretary of Spanish Club 2. 



MAY, RITA 

lunior C'ollege Y.W.C.A. 1, 2; Sigma 
Delta Chi. 



MORGAN, FR.ANKIE 

Junior College Y.W.C.A. 1. 2; Zeta 
Rho Sigma; Annual Staff. 



KOCH, H. F. B. 

1st Lieutenant 1, 2; Sabre Club 1, 2; 
Red X 1, 2; Literary Society 2. 



MARRIOTT. BETTY 
Basketball Team 1, 2. 



MATTHEWS, MARGARET S. 
I'lii Theta Ka]ipa. 



.MORAGXE, MABEL 



Ml'LHERIX. JOE 

High Honor 1; Golf Team 1, 2; Rho 
Chi 1, 2; X'arsity Club 1, 2; Phi 
Theta Kappa. 






iitk^\ 




Sophomores 



MURPHEY, MOSE 



MURRAY, MABEL 



Honor 1; Drawing Club: Phi Theta Basketljall 1, 2; Jr. College Y.W.C.A. 

Kappa. 1, 2: Life Savers Club 2. 



NEVIN, MARY CLAIRE 
Junior College Y.W.C.A. 1, 2. 



OWENS, MAE 

Junior College Y.W.C.A. 1; Literary 
Society I. 



PARKS, G. H. 

Basketball 1: Varsity Club; 1st 
Lieutenant 1; Captain 2; Sabre Club 
1. 2; J.C.A. Hi-Y; Gold "R" Society. 



PIERCE. EDDIE PEARL 

Radio Dramatic Club 1; Junior Col- 
lege Y.W.C.A. 2. 



NORVELL, T. E. 
Pre-Law Club 1; Tennis Club 1, 2. 



PAQUETTE, GEORGIA 

School Reporter 1,2; Junior College 
Y.W.C.A. 1, 2; Zeta Rho Sigma 1, 2; 
Varsity Club 1, 2; Bowling Team 1. 
2; Musketeer 1, 2; Business Staff 
of "Rainbow" 2. 



PAULK, MARY ELIZABETH 

High Honor 1; Circulation Manager 
of "Rainbow" 2; Sigma Delta Chi 2; 
Phi Theta Kappa. 



POMERANCE, ELLIOTT 

Basketball 1, 2; Varsity Club 1, 2; 
Rho Chi 2. 



The J. C. A. 



POPKIN, H. G. 

Basketball 1. 2; 1st Lieutenant 1, 2; 
Sabre Club 1, 2; Varsity Club I, 2; 
Literary Society 2; Managing Editor 
of Musketeer 1 ; Assistant Editor of 
Musketeer. 



ROESEL, JOHN C. 

Honor 1; 1st Lieutenant 1; Captain 
2; Sabre Club 1, 2; Literary Society 
2; Glee Club 2; Stunt Night 2; 
Romanic Philological Society 1; 
Demolay 2. 



SENN, LUCY 



SIMON, CARL JULIEN 

Highest Honor 1; Radio Dramatic 
Club 1; 1st Lieutenant 1; Sal)re Club 
1; Literary Society 1; Demolay 1, 2; 
Business Manager of "Rainljow'" 2; 
Gold "R"; Phi Theta Kappa: Vale- 
dictorian 2; Business Manager Stunt 
Night 2: Beta Club I. 2. 



STAFFORD, MAKY 



Jiiniiir College 
Rho Sigma 2. 



YAV.C.A. 



Zela 



ROBINS, DORIS 

Bowling Team 1 ; Swimming Club 
1, 2; Junior College YAV.C.A. 2; 
Basketball 2. 



SALLEY, FRITZ 

Musketeer Staff 1, 2; President of 
Literary Society Ij 2. 



SHEFTALL, MARGARET 

Honor 1; Glee Club 1, 2; Literary 
Society 1, 2; Jr. College Y.W.C.A. 
1, 2: Vice-President of Jr. College 
Y.W.C.A. 2; Radio Dramatic Clubl; 
Treasurer of Zeta Rho Sigma 2; 
Superlative 1 ; Fashion Show 1 ; 
Sponsor 1, 2; Editor-in-Chief of 
"Rainbow" 2; Secretary of Sopho- 
more Class; Phi Theta Kappa. 



SMITH. WILLIAM H. 

1st Lieutenant 1; Captain 2; Sabre 
Club 1. 2; Pre-Law Club; Bachelor's 
Club. 



STANFORD. LLOYD ALBERT 

Editor-in-Chief of "Rainbow" 1 ; 
-Advertising Manager of "Rainbow" 
2; Business Manager of Musketeer 
1 ; Student Manager of Football 
Program 1; Rho Chi 1, 2; Prciident 
of Rho Chi 1, 2; Varsity Club; Lieu- 
tenant 1 : Sabre Club 1. 2; Tennis 
Team 1; Life Savers Club 1, 2; Cam- 
era Club; Glee Club; Demolay 1, 2; 
M;ister Councilor of Demolay 2; 
Gold "R." 




I 




Sophomores 



STELLING, MARTHA 
Secretary of Jr. College Y.W.C.A. 



SUHR, GEORGE 

Honor 1; 1st Lieutenant 1, 2; Sabre 
\ Club 1, 2. 



TEUTON, EDWARD 

Rho Chi 1, 2; Secretary-Treasurer of 
Rho Chi 2. 



- TROWBRIDGE, LAURA 

Jr. College Y.W.C.A. 1, 2; Lite 
Savers Club. 



WARR, COOPER, JR. 

Pre-Law Club 1 2; Secretary' of 
Pre-Law Club 2. 



STULB, MARY 

Basketball \, 2; Literary Society 1, 
2; Jr. College Y.W.C.A. 1, 2; Var- 
sity Club; Life Savers Club. 



TALBERT, MIRIAM 

High Honor 1; Literary Society 1; 
Jr. College Y.W.C.A. 1, 2; Phi 
Theta Kappa. 



TIMM, DOROTHY 

Junior College Y.W.C.A. 1, 2; Bas- 
ketball 1, 2. 



TUCKER, "TEENY" 

Jr. College Y.W.C.A.; Bowling 
Team ; Sigma Delta Chi. 



WONG, THOMAS 

2nd Lieutenant 1; 1st Lieutenant 2; 
Sabre Club 1, 2; J.C.A. Hi-Y 1, 2. 



Poems 

By Margaret Sheftall 

AUTUMN 

No longer trees of dull, dark green, 
They're now a treasure red and gold. 
Nature's splashed the woods with colors, 
Warm enouefh to melt the cold. 



MUSIC 

Sweet music, — a haunting melody that brings 

thoughts too deep to understand. 
Music, that is gay and persuades your sad heart to 

skip a beat; 
Mad rhythm, that makes your feet hum; 
Sad music, that brings tears and melancholy, 
Glad music, that merely brings a feeling of 

contentment and happiness; 
Stirring music, that makes you inwardly aflame. 
Music — What is it? 

That strange tempo that stirs the human soul. 
Music, that reaches the innermost depths of a 

human heart; 
Music — mysterious, strange, beautiful. 
Is it a message of souls? 



NIGHT 

Night has fallen — dim, cool, stillness. 

Every sound has been hushed. 

The deep silence is a lialm to my tired soul. 

O, calm of night, come enfold me ; 

Let me feel your coolness caress my fevered brow, 

Let your dampness seep into my heart, and cool the 

burning passion there. 
Wrap my tangled thoughts in }i)ur blackness. 
And let Day's turmoil fall shrieking into your deep 

abyss. 
O night, hear my thoughts and hush them ; 
Know my fears and crush them. 
Let me drink deep of your solitude — so calm that 

its damp sweetness masters me. 
Let me for one instant feel your mvsterious 

nearness ! 



CLASS PHOPHECY OF HO 



I adjust all the lights, then I sink in my chair. 
All inspiration has vanished in air. 
The thouohts in my head have gone out for the night. 
And the prophecy or testament I never will write. 

Shall I pray to my Muse? That's what Milton would do. 

But, gosh! I'm no Milton — and neither are you. 

So Sleep, gentle Sleep, the \ictory is yours. 

You ma}- hold here full swa}- \^-hile my fantasy soars. 

But say! What's this place? I've not been here before; 
And what's on this sign that is hung on the door? 
J.C.A.'S GRADUATES OF '40 WILL DINE 
AT A BIG CLASS REUNION THIS EVENING 
AT NINE. 

So, in I walked and down I sat. 
And listened to news of this and that. 
The more I listened, the more I learned, 
And here's the gist of what I discerned. 

Alfred Battey, handsome and tall. 

Was selling tickets to the President's Ball. 

In some big city he was chief M. D., 

And his choice expression was, "Now let me see." 

Eddie Pierce — so they say. 

Went exploring in old S. A. 

She found some animals with 3-ellow fur, 

And science still wonders what they were. 

Margaret Sheftall, tall and slim, 

Was modeling clothes for the perfect femme, 

Until one day she tripped on her gown 

When she saw a certain guy from her "ole home town". 

Cason Bruker, fiddle in hand, 
Was the proud conductor of a concert band. 
He had promised to play his new composition — 
To write a hundred was his ambition. 

Betty Andrews, chic and fair. 
Was wearing jewels in her hair. 
She introduced the "Riders' Club Plan" 
And smiled as only Betty can. 

Virginia Anderson, keen and smart, 

Was a star detective right to the heart. 

She had cracked some tough cases not long before. 

And now she's guarding the Hardy's front door. 

Jack Hains, the "colonel", with a dame on his arm. 
Was bemoaning the loss of his "model" Farm. 
He went on a cruise and mortgaged his land — 
He lost the farm, but the trip was grand. 

Elisabeth Bryans, in a new red dress. 
Had a new degree — M.R.S. 

She now could give up that burden she'd borne, 
^^'riting her column "Advice to the Lovelorn". 

Sara Jane Chapman, just back from "Paree", 

Where she told all the Frenchmen what fashions 

would be. 
Came to the banquet and startled the class 
In her gown trimmed with feathers and woven of glass. 



Carl Simon, of Wall Stjrtet and financial fame, 
Lost all his "dough" in a poker game. 
NcAv he's back in Augusta and resolved to stay. 
He'll design new lamp-posts for Walton Way. 

Celeste Bignon, once a good nurse. 

Had a patient with measles, or something far worse. 

When they asked her quite simply, "And did the 

man die?" 
She said. "'No, my goodness I I married the guy." 

Constance Elliott, smart and keen, 
Designs for a leading magazine. 
She looks just like a fashion plate. 
Tall, beautiful, and so sedate. 

In town while on tour was "Romeo Bo" 
Who'd given up medicine to be a golf pro. 
His 9:30 practice helped him achieve fame, 
Now even nut sundaes are bearing his name. 

Teeny Tucker has changed her name 
And thO'Ugh she hasn't achieved such fame, 
Still she's a happy and homeloving wife. 
My, how she's changed since her college life. 

Georgia Paquette and Maxine Farr 

Are now in a play in which they star. 

They love New York and there they'll stay, 

'Cause their names shine brightly on Old Broadway. 

Tommy Houck, long and lanky. 
Was selling equipment to every Yankee. 
His salesman's ability didn't go so far — 
Now he's writing a poem, "On A Star". 

A business executive was Mary E. Paulk, 
Her wonderful efTiciency was all the talk. 
They made her chairman of all the committees, 
And her name was well known in all the big cities. 

A great engineer was Francis Jenny. 
Although his work cost a "pretty penny," 
He was the most popular contractor in town. 
And met all his problems with that dignified frown. 

Martha Stelling has a band 

The best "All-Girl" one in the land. 

Dorothy Timm sings songs so blue. 

We knew they'd never separate these twO'. 

File Carswell, tiny and gay 

Still laughing and talking as yesterday, 

Is in a large city hospital far away — 

And an efficient nurse she's destined to stay. 

Julia Hill, now teaching French, 
Says teaching this language is really a cinch. 
But since her life now is all work and no play, 
She's slowly but surely turning quite gray. 




THE 



OFFICERS 

President Walter Reiser 

Vice-President . . . Jinimie Cooper 
Secretary .... Dorothy Douglas 

Treasurer Harry Pund 

Student Council . . . Louis B-ittey 
Student Council . . . Pat Calhoun 



Our F'reshman officers are a carefree, intelligent group of students who believe that this year's 
Freshmen are tops. When we notice who represents this class, we find it easy to believe that it would 
be hard to' beat. Walter "Sonny" Reiser is one of the most popular, and one of the most intellectual, 
boys in the school. His scholastic record is something for his classmates to aim at. Jimmie Cooper 
finds time to play some swell basketball and take part in school activities. The one and only girl in the 
group is Dottie Douglas, who is a good representative of all Junior College girls. Dottie was unanimously 
voted the most popular Freshman girl. Harry Pund is "one of the boys" in every sense of the phrase. 
He thinks the clubs in the school are very important fur every bov — Pat Calhoun and Louis Battey 
make able Student Council members. Both of these boys are popular, intelligent, and active J.C.A. 
Freshmen. Next year's leaders will have to be superlative to pass these officers in any phase of Junior 
Ciillege activitv. 



Walter Reiser Louis Battey Pat Calhoun Jinimie Cooper Dot Douglas 



Harrv Pund 



J.C.A. FRESHMEN ^^ 



ADAMS, BARBARA MARIE 



BARBIN, ROBERT 

President, Camera Club; Alanager, 
Stunt Night; Fashion Show; Annual 
Staff Photographer. 



BENTLEY, HUBERT 
Red "X" Society. 



ARRINGTON, KATHRYN 
Fashion Show. 



BARNARD, DOUGLAS 



BLACKVVELL, LUCILLE 



Captain of Band; Sabre Club; Glee Musketeer Staff; Fashion Show. 

Clul). 



BAIRD, RICHARD L. 

1st Lieutenant, Sabre Club ; Order of 
Demolav. 



BATTEY, LOUIS L. 

Rho t.'hi; Student Council; J. C. A. 
Hi-Y. 



BOLGLA, BENNIE 
Basketball. 



BAKER, BOBBY 

1st Lieutenant, Sabre Club; \'arsity 
Club; J.C.A. Hi-Y; Baske.ball. 



BEDINGFIELD, HUGH 
Band; Demolav Orchestra. 



BRUCKNER, ALBERT 




ADAMS, BARBARA MARIE 
ARRINGTON, KATHRYN 
BAIRD, RICHARD L. 
BAKER, BOBBY 



BARBIN, ROBERT 
BARNARD, DOUGLAS 
BATTEY, LOUIS L. 
BEDINGFIELD, HUGH 



BENTLEY, HUBERT 
BLACKWELL, LUCILLE 
BOLGLA, BENNIE 
BRUCKNER, ALBERT 



BRUNKHURST, AUDREY 
CALHOUN, PATRICK 
CARPENTER, HARRY 
CARROLL, PHILLIP 



CHASE, HENRY H. 
COOPER. JIMMIE 
COSBY, RAY 
DEMORE, OTTIE 



DENNIS, FRANK S. 
DOUGLAS. DOROTHY 
DUNBAR, FRANCES 
ELLENBURG, MINNIE 




BRUNKHURST, AUDREY 

Literary Society; Y.W.C.A. Glee 
Club;. 



CHASE, HEXRV H. 



DENNIS, 1-RAXK S. 



CALHOUN, PATRICK 
Student Council: Kho Chi. 



COOPER. JIM.MIE 

J.C.A. Hi-Y ; 2nd Lieutenant. Sabre 
Club; Basketball; Life Savers Club; 
Varsity Club; Vice-President, Fresli- 
nian Class. 



DOUGLAS. IKJROTHY 

Glee Club; Literary Society; Zeta 
Rho Sigma; Y.W.C.A.; Fashion 
Sliow. 



CARPENTER. HARRY 

1st Lieutenant, Sabre Club; Camera 
Club. 



COSBY, RAY H. 
Red "X" Society; Life Saver? Club. 



DUNBAR, FRANCES 

Sigma Delta Chi; Y.\V.C..\.; Bas- 
ketball. 



CARROLL. M. PHILLIP 
Captain. Sabre Club; Camera Club. 



DEMORE. OTTIE 
Y.\\'.C..'\.; Literarv Societv. 



ELl.EXBURG. MINNIE 



¥ 



-f 



^ 






J. C. A. FRESHMEN ^ ^ 



ELLIOTT, SEWELL 



l-'LEMIXG. MARTHA 
Zeta Rlio Sigma. 



GOLDBERG, JOE 

Musketeer Staff. 



EPPS. JONES 

Major; Sabre Club: Red "X" So- 
ciety: Gold "R" Society; J. C. A. 
Hi-Y. 



FULCHER, DOROTHY 



GOLDBERG, SANFORD 
Pre-Law Club. 



EVANS, H. T. 
Order of Demolav. 



GEHRIvEN, CATHERINE 
Glee Club 



GOODWIN, CATHERINE 



FERGUSON, ETHEL 



GILLMAN, NATHAN 
Lieutenant, Sabre Club, Rho-Chi. 



GRAHAM, ELIZABETH 
Spanish Club. 




ELLIOTT, SEWELL 
EPPS, JONES 
EVANS, H. T. 
FERGUSON, ETHEL 



FLEMING, MARTHA 
FULCHER, DOROTHY 
GEHRKEN, CATHERINE 
GILLMAN, NATHAN 



GOLDBERG, JOE 
GOLDBERG, SANFORD 
GOODWIN, CATHERINE 
GRAHAM, ELIZABETH 



GRIDLEY, DOROTHEA 
&URLEY, KENNETH 
HAGLER. J. C. 
HANCOCK, REGINALD 



HOWARD, HARRIETTE 
HULL, HELEN 
HULL, JIM 
HUNTER, HELEN 



HURLBUTT, MARJORIE 
JACKSON, ARTHUR L. 
JOHNSTON, HOWARD 
JUMPER, JULIAN 




GRIDLEY, DOROTHEA 
Zeta Rho Sigma. 



HOWARD, HARRIETTE 



HURLBUTT, MARJORIE 

Literary Society; Spanish Club; 
YAY.C.A 



GURLEY, KENNETH 

J.C.A. Hi-Y; Literary Society; Left- 
overs; Glee Club; Participant in 
Winning Stunt on Stunt Night. 



HULL, HELEN 
Literary Society; J.C.A. Hi-V. 



JACKSON, ARTHUR L. 
Assistant Editor, "The Musketeer.' 



HAGLER, J. C. 

Rho- Chi; Musketeer Staff; Camera 
Club. 



HULL, JIM 



JOHNSTON, HOWARD 
1st Lieutenant, Sabre Club. 



HANCOCK, REGINALD 
Captain; Sabre Club. 



IIUNTEK, HELEN 



JUMPER. JULIAN 



J^ 



•k 



■A- 



^ 



J. C. A. FRESHMEN ^ 4^ 



KEMP, JANELLE 
Sigma Delta Chi; Camera Club. 



l.ANDKUM, BILL 



MARRIOTT, CLAIR 
Basketball Team. 



KESSLER, DORIS 

Camera Club; Y.VV.C.A, Basketball; 
Life Saving Club. 



LAWRENCE, C. K. 
Clee Club, Pre-Law Club 



MARTIN, H. B. 



KNAPP, FRANK 
Captain; Sabre Club. 



LEWIS, MARY 
Glee Club, Camera Club, Y.VV.C.A. 



McDonald, hazel 

Literary Society; Spanish Club; Sec- 
retary for International Student So- 
ciety from Augusta Y.W.C.A. Glee 
Club. 



LAMKIN. ROBERT WALTON MAGUIRE, ALFRED 

Spanish Club. 



McELMURRAY, JAMES 




KEMP, JANELLE 

KESSLER, DORIS 

KNAPP, FRANK 

LAMKIN, ROBERT WALTON 



LANDRUM, BILL 
LAWRENCE, CARL 
LEWIS, MARY 
MAGUIRE, ALFRED 



MARRIOTT, CLAIR 
MARTIN, H. B. 
McDONALD, HAZEL 
McELMURRAY, JAMES 



MELVIN, LILLIAN 
MILLIGAN, MILDRED 
MOSS, BEN ERASER 
MULLIN, MARY 



MURPHEY, MARGARET 
NEWBERRY, BONNIE MAE 
NORVELL, HAROLD 
NOWELL, JIMMIE 



OELLERICH, LILLIE 
OLIVE, CONSTANCE 
OVERMAN, LEHMAN 
OWENS, MILLWEE 




MELVIN, LILLIAN 
Glee Club, Camera Club, Y.W.C.A. 



MURPHEY, MARGARET 



OELLERICH, LILLIE 



MILLIGAN, MILDRED 

Camera Club; Basketball, Y.W.C.A., 
Life Saving Club. 



NEWBERRY, BONNIE MAE 
Zeta Rho Sigma: Basketball, 



OLI\'E, CONSTANCE 
Sigma Delta Chi; Y.W.C.A. 



MOSS, BEN ERASER 



NORVELL, HAROLD 

Captain; Sabre Club. 



OVERMAN, LEHMAN 



MULLIN. MARY 
Musketeer Staff. 



NOWELL. JIMMIE 

Glee Club; Camera Club; Leftovers; 
Musketeer Staff; Annual Staff; Gold 
"R" Societv; Varsity Club. 



OWENS, MILLWEE 
Spanish Club; Stunt Night. 



^ 



iK 



• 



J.C.A. FRESHMEN ^ i^ 



PATTERSON. FRANCES MAY 
Y.W.C.A. 



POLLOCK, ED.WIN 
Rlio Chi; Camera Club. 



REISER, WALTER A. 

1st Lieutenant, Sabre Club; J.C.A. 
Hi-Y; President of Class; Student 
Council; Glee Club; Editor of the 
"Musketeer" ; Annual Staff; Gold 
"R'' Society; Literary Society; Life 
Savers Club. 



PEEPLES. ELIZABETH 
Simna Delta Chi; Y.W.C.A. 



PUND, HARRY C. 

Treasurer of Class; Order of Demo- 
lav ■ Rho Chi. 



RHODES, McAllister 

J.C.A. HiY-; Spanish Club; 2nd 
Lieutenant; Sabre Club; Order of 
Dernolay. 



PEMBER, JOSEPH 



REAin'. WILLIAM A. 



ROBERTSON, HEARD 
Camera Club. 



PIERCE, MARY EMMA 

Sigma Delta Chi; Y.W.CA.; Bas- 
ketball. 



REESE. AGNES 

Literary Society Officer; Y.W.C.A.; 
Featiirc Editor of Musketeer; Pic- 
ture Editor of "Rainbow." 



ROESEL, DOROTHY 
Y.W.C.A.; Camera Club; Glee Club 




PATTERSON, FRANCES MAY 
PEEPLES, ELIZABETH 
PEMF.ER, JOSEPH 
PIERCE, MARY EMMA 



POLLOCK, EDWIN 
PUND, HARRY C. 
READY, WILLIAM A. 
REESE, AGNES 



REISER. WALTER A. 

RHODES, McAllister 

ROBERTSON, HEARD 
ROESEL, DOROTHY 



RUCKER, I. a: ■ ,, 
SCOTT, MYRA 
SEIGLER, JOE MORGAN 
SHELL, J. E. 



STALLINGS, MARGARET 
STARR. DOROTHY ANN 
STEINBERG, M. E. 
STEINBERG, M. K. 



STEELING, T. OSBORNE 
SUTTON, HELEN 
SYMMS, MARGUERITE 
TEAGUE, CLAIRE 




RUCKER, I. G. 



STALLINGS, MARGARET 



STHLLINC;, T. OSBORNE 

2nd Lieutenant; Sabre Cliil); Life 
Savers Club. 



SCOTT, MYRA 

Spanish Club Reporter; Literary 
Society; Y.W.C.A.; Stunt Night. 



STARR, DOROTHY ANN 

Glee Club; Camera Club; Y.W.C.A. 
Zeta Rho Sigma. 



SUTTON. HELEN 

Literary Society; Glee Club; Stunt 
Night. 



SEIGLER, JOE MORGAN 
Basketball Team. 



STEINBERG, M. E. 



SYMMS. MARGUERITE 

Glee Club; Secretary of Literary 
Sf^ciety; Y.W.C.A. Stunt Night; Life 
Savers Club. 



SHELL, J. E. STEINBERG, M. K. 

1st Lieutenant, Sabre Chib; Red "X" Corporal: Spanish Club; Stunt Night. 

Society. 



TEAGUE, CLAIRE 



^ 



•k 



T^ 



^ 



1 



J.C.A. FRESHMEN ^^ 



THURMOND, C. B.. JR. 

Captain: Sabre Club; Glee Club; 
Leftovers; Winner on Stunt Night. 



WEISS. GEORGE 



WILSON, ANNE 

Literary Society; Life Savers Club; 
Y.W.C.A. 



TOOLE, MARY ANNE 

Literary Society; Glee Club; Zeta 
Rho Si.sjma; Y.W.C.A. Life Savers 
Club; Musketeer StafT; Fashion 
Show. 



WHrrAKER, MIRIAM 
Literarv Societv. 



WOOD, DORIS 



Y.W.C.A. 



TORPIN, MIMI 

President of Spanish Club; Literary 
Society; Stunt Night. 



WHITT. VIRGINIA 
Basketball Team. 



WOODWARD, CLIFFORD 



WALLER, HARCOURT, E. 

1st Lieutenant, Sabre Club; Varsity 
Club; Gold "R" Society; Basketball; 
Literary Society. 



WILLINGHAM, JULIAN 

'nd Lieutenant, Sabre Club; Glee 
Club. 



YOUNGBLOOD, HAROLD 





1^^'^ \ 



^Cr^it^ 



,ir 




THURMOND, C. B. JR. 
TOOLE, MARY ANNE 
TORPIN, MIMI 
WALLER, HARCOURT E. 



WEISS, GEORGE 
WHITAKER, MIRIAM 
WHITT, VIRGINIA 
WILLINGHAM, JULIAN 



WILSON, ANNE 
WOOD, DORIS 
WOODWARD, CLIFFORD 
YOUNGBLOOD, HAROLD 



THE JUNIOR COLLEGE OF AUGUSTA 
Retrospect and Prospect 

The Junior College of Augusta was establislied bv the Board (jf Education in 1925. Its founder 
and original planner was the late Dr. George P. Butler, who became its first president. Unlike many 
educational institutions, it was n<i spurious grt)wth, but it came into e.xistence in response to a genuine 
community need, and from the outset has had the enthusiastic support of the community which it 
serves. These considerations are its primary elements of strength and offer the jn-incipal assurance of 
its outstanding growth and perpetuity. 

The Junior College of Augusta was one of the fist public junior colleges founded in this section of 
the South. ]\Iany others ha\e come into existence in this section since the date of its founding, but this 
institution has held a unique place of leadershi]i among them from the very beginning. This has been 
due largely to the wisdom of its founders in setting up curricula which were in every sense standard 
anfl the equixalent of the first two years in the best four-\ear standard colleges and universities. In 
addition to this, its instructional staff has always been composed of men who represent the best 
scholarship of man\' of the best .American universit'es, and who have been carefully selected because 
of their rich experience and eminent success as teachers. 

Almost immediately after the Junior College began to function, it was admitted to membership in 
the Southern .Association of Colleges and Secondary Schools, and the American Association of Junior 
Colleges. It is also a member of the Georgia Association of Colleges (senior) and the Association of 
Georgia Junior Colleges. The strength of its exam[)le and the leadership of its Faculty have been 
strongly felt in the counsels of these associations. 

As important as these things are in the life and standing of an educational institution, the final 
measure of its greatness must be found in its jiroduct. That its pri)duct is good is e\'idenccd by the eag- 
erness of the senior colleges and universities to get these jiroducts. The ])remiums th.ey are willing to 
pay are shown bv the thousands of dollars worth of schoIarshi])s that ha\e been made available to the 
graduates of the Junior College of .\ugusta. By actual count these graduates have gone into more than 
one hundred dififerent .\merican Colleges and Universities. The triennial reports on their success, which 



have to he made to the Southern Association of Colleges, show that they have all been able to do the 
work of the higher institutions not only with outstanding success, but in many cases with great dis- 
tinction. This holds true not only of those going to the Liberal Arts Colleges, but also of those who 
have gone into the schools of Law, Medicine and Engineering. 

The enrollment of the Junior College has been steadily increasing. __The total for the present 
session, 1939-40, is 270 students, about equally divided between young men and young women. In its 
short life, the Junior College of Augusta has graduated approximately 700 students, approximately 
60% of whom have gone on to higher institutions. The total saving to the community has been in round 
numbers around $2,000,000.00. There has been no enterprise of any kind which has yielded such a 
dividend in dollars and cents saved, to say nothing of the enrichment of the young life of the community 
through their contacts with men of fine ideals and high scholarship. 

The Junior College of Augusta has the physical equipment with which to do high-grade work. 
No college in the state has better laboratories. One of the fastest growing features of the college is its 
splendid Library, hc>using now over eight thousand carefulh- chosen \olumes and hundreds of unbound 
publications. It is receiving net accessions of approximately 1500 volumes each year. The greatest im- 
mediate need of the Junior College is a special building to take care of its rapidly growing library. Here is 
the opportunity for some wealthy citizen to build for himself a monument that will outlast the stone 
and steel that may go into it. 

More important than physical equipment is the philosophy of education to which officers and 
teachers ::ubscrihe. The Faculty agrees unanimously that in the process of true education there is no 
place for sham or superficiality. They subscribe to the proposition that the world needs only men and 
women of cultivated brains, but above all else of stable character. They believe that the Christian ideal 
is the finest thing in the world ; that there can never be true culture without Christian character. In 
the midst of a world of cynicism and change, they believe that there are moral values which are eternal 
and unchanging. 

Finally, it should be said that there is no place in the class-rooms or on the campus for the pro- 
pagandist of any creed or doctrine subversive to the spirit of America. The Junior College of Augusta 
will maintain at whatever cost the traditions of patriotism and unspoiled Americanism that Ijelong 
historically to the Community that it will continue to serve. 




Henry Caver 



-k 





SENIORS 



Officers 

President Henr\' Ca\er 

Vice-President Bul'jlier Cole 

Secretary Ralph Chaney 

Treasurer Rudolph Chaney 

Student Council Bernard Mitchum 

Student Council Louis Ross 



The Senior Class officers this year 
combine brawn with brains to make 
outstanding- officers. All of the boys 
have impressive athletic and scholas- 
tic records. Our president, "Hank" 
Caver, illustrates what we mean by 
brawn. He started out as a freshman 
playing' real football. Since then, he 
has regularly been a member of the 
football and track teams, each year. 
His presidency climaxes his record 
of popularity among his classmates. 

Rubber Cole shouldn't be over- 
looked when anyone talks of "he- 
men", either. He has been a triple- 
threat ever since he joined the 
Richmond football team. Bubber was 
recently voted the most popular 
Senior by the A. R. C. student body. 

Ralph and Rudolph Chaney have 
records that should make anyone 
envious. Both are honor students, 
vcrj' active in student activities, and 
both are excellent swimmers. A 
combination within a combination. 

Bernard Mitchum is an important 
member of the Academy Rifle Team 
and an even more important mem- 
ber of our football team. 




Rubber Cole 



Ralph Chaney 

Riultjlpli Chaney 



Louis Ross is one of the "big" 
men in the Academy. No one knows 
tliat better than the beaten football 
players who have had the misfortune 
to tangle with him. Louis won the 
honor of being named on the All 
G.l.A.A. football team. 

With such a student government, 
the Senior Class can not fail to 
progress. 



Bernard Mitclui 



Louis Ross 





^ 



ADAMS, AL G. 



ALLERTON, S. CHARLES 
Corporal 4; Sergeant 5. 



ANDERSON, FRED GORDON 

Corporal 1, 2; Sergeant 2, 3; Ser- 
geant-Major 4; 2nd Lieutenant 4; 
Member of Best Drilled Co. 3; Sabre 
Club 4; Freshman Literary Society, 
Program Director; Spanish Club 3; 
Bachelors Club 3, 4; Winner of 
Stunt Night 1. 



ATKINSON, ARCHIE 

Sergeant 3; Corporal S; Band 1, 2, 3; 
Track Team 3, 4, S; Letter in Track 
4, S. 



AVERY, LESLIE EUGENE 

Sergeant 4: 2nd Lieutenant 5: "B" 
Varsity Football 1: "A" Varsity 
Football 2, 3, 4, 5: Letter in Foot- 
ball 3, 4, 5; Letter in Track 3, 4, 5; 
Varsity Club 2, 3, 4, 5; Academy 
Hi-Y 3, 4, 5, Chaplain S; Voted Most 
Athletic Senior S. 



ALLEN, CHARLES D. 

Sergeant 1: Corporal 4; Freshman 
Literary Society; Alpha Lambda 
Sigma 4. 



AMOS, PAUL A. 

Corporal 1; Sergeant 2, 3, 4, 5; Mem- 
ber of Prize Platoon 4; Company 
Football 2; Company Basketball 2; 
Red "X" Society S. 



ANDERSON, SHIVERS L. 

Corporal 1, 2, 4; Member of Prize 
Platoon 3; Honor 2. 



AUSTIN, WILLIAM DURDEN 

Corporal 2, 3: Sergeant 4; Company 
Football 2, 3; Company Basketball 
3; Member of Prize Platoon 2, 3; 
Spanish Club. 



AVRETT. JAMES HYMAN 

"B" Varsity Football 3, 4; Fresh- 
man Literary Society; Alpha Lamb- 
da Sigma 2. 



^ 



RICHMOND 



BAILIE, ALLSTON G. 

Corporal 3, 4; Sergeant 4; High 
Honor 1, 3; Honor 2; Beta Club 3, 
4; Freshman Literary Society; Alpha 
Lambda Sigma 2, 3,4, Treasurer 2, 3; 
Richmond Hi-Y 4. 



BARRETT, ARNOLD B. 

Member of Prize Platoon 2, 3; 
Swimming Team 3; Richmond Hi-Y 
3, 4. 



BARTON. RALEIGH ED. 

"B" \'arsity Football 4; Honor 1, 3; 
Vice-President of Freshman Class 1; 
Secretary of Junior Class 3; Rich- 
mond Hi-Y 3, 4. 



BECKUM, WILLIAM A. 



BELL, GEORGE MARSTON 

Corporal 1; Band 3, 4; Debating 
Team, Alternate 1, 2; .\lpha Lambda 
Sigma 2, 3; Bachelors Club 3, 4. 



BARNES, GEORGE 

Track Team 4; Letter in Track 4: 
\'arsity Club 4; Academy Hi-Y 4. 



BARTLEY, JAMES L. 

Sergeant 1, 2, 3, 4: "B" Varsity 
Football 1. 2; Freshman Literary i 
Society. 



BATEMAN, HEYWARD 



BELDING, JOSEPH E. 

Corporal 4; Band 1, 2, 3 ,4: Fresh- 
man Literary Society. 



BLACK, JACK 

Corporal 1, 4; Sergeant 2, 3; Mem- 
ber of Best Drilled Squad, Platoon, 
and Company 1; Company Football 
1, 2; Freshman Literary Society; 
Academy Hi-Y 4. 




S E N I 




ACADEMY 



BLANOS, EMANUEL N. 

Corporal 1,2; Sergeant 3,4; Band 1, 
2; "B" Varsity Basketball Team 3; 
Freshman Literary Society; Aca- 
demy Hi-Y4; Orchestra 1,2; "Rain- 
bow" Staff 3; "Musketeer" Staff 3, 4; 
Managing Editor 4; On Stunt Night 
Program 4. 



BRANDENBURG, WALTER M. 



BROOME, EDGAR H. 



BROTHERTON, WILLIAM J. 

Sergeant 1; Corporal 2, 3, 4; Best 
Drilled Freshman Cadet 1; Life 
Savers Club 3. 



BROWNE, LOUIS D. 

Sergeant 2, 4; Honor 1, 2, 3; Aca- 
demy Hi-Y 3, 4; Secretary 4; Presi- 
dent 4; Tennis Team 4. 



BOWYER, MONROE 

Smallest Cadet in Academy of Rich- 
mond County 1, 2, 3, 4; Sergeant 2, 
3, 4; Company Clerk 4; Student 
Council 3; "Musketeer" Staff 4; 
Mascot of J.C.A. Girls' Basketball 
Team 2, 3, 4. 



BRITTON, WILLIAM L. 

Corporal 3; 2nd Lieutenant 4; 1st 
Lieutenant 5; Captain 5; Member of 
Prize Platoon 2, 3; Sabre Club 4, 5. 



BROOME, JAMES E. 



BROWN, DAN ALLEN 
Corporal 1, 2, 3, 4. 



BULLOCK. E. V. 
High Honor 1, 2, 3; Beta Club 4. 



O R S 



RICHMOND 



:L"SH, WILLIAM G. 

K( II r I, 3; Freshman Literary So- 
cicly: Alpha Lambda Sigma 4; Ser- 
Rcar.t-:;t-Arms 4. 



CARD. LANCE L. 

Ccr- ral 1, 2, 3: Sergeant 3, 4; Ser- 
fica t Major 4: Member of Prize 
Pl-t n 2. 3; Glee Club 4. 



CARTER. CHARLES L. 



( r 



CATER. IDIS B. 

oral 1, 2, 3. 4; Company Clerk 
! ember of Prize Platoon 2; "B" 
ity Football Team 1. 3: "A" 
ity Football Team 2; Track 
.1 2. 3: Academy Hi-Y 3, 4. 



CAVER. HENRY P. 

C (irporal 4: Staff Sergeant 5: "B" 
\ -rsity Football Team 1; "A" Var- 
s'ty Football Team 2, 3. 4. 5: Track 
Tfani 2. 3, 4; Letter for Track 3, 4; 
Member of G.I. A. A. Football Team 
S; Student Council 3: President of 
v.'. :iior Class 5. 



CALAMAS. DEXXIS 

Corporal 1. 2. 3; Sergeant 4: Band 
2. 3. 4; Member of Best Drilled Pla- 
toon and Company 1; Member All 
State Band 3; Honor 1; Alpha 
Lambda Sigma . 



CARRY. ROBERT 

Corporal 2: Sergeant 3. 4; Cadet 
Bugler 3. 4: Instructor in Bugle 
Corps 4. 



CARTER. HENRY H. 

Corporal 4: Honor 1.2,3; Freshman 
Literary Society: Beta Club 4: Span- 
ish Club 4. 



CATO. WAYLAND H. 

Member of Prize Platoon 3: High 
Honor 1. 2; Honrr 3; Beta Club 3; 
Freshman Literary Society; Rich- 
mond Hi-Y 2. 4. 



CAWLEY. SAM H. 
Corporal 3; Sergeant 4. 




S E N I 





ACADEMY 



CHAMBERS. RICHARD L. 



CHANCE. PAUL T. 

Sergeant 4; Member of Prize Pla- 
toon 2; Track Team 2; Glee Club 4. 



CHAXEY. RUDOLPH E. 

Corporal 3; Sergeant 4; Swimming 
Team 3; Varsity Club 3, 4; Honor 1 ; 
Student Council 2; Treasurer of Jun- 
ior Class 3; Treasurer of Senior 
Class 4: Freshman Literary Society; 
President, Richmond Hi-Y 2, 3, 4; 
Chaplain 3; President 4. 



COMLEY, ROBERT LEE 

Sergeant 1; Corporal 2. 3; Honor 1; 
High Honor 2; Beta Club 4. 



COOPER, JOXES WILLL\M 

Corporal 1, 2; Sergeant 3, 4; Tennis 
Team 4; Student Council 1; Secre- 
tary of Sophomore Class 2; Treas- 
urer of Junior Class 3; Glee Club 4. 



CHANCE. JAMES W. 

Member of Best Drilled Platoon and 
Company 2; Tennis Team 3, 4; Aca- 
demy Hi-Y 3. 



CHANEY, RALPH H., JR, 

Corporal 3: Sergeant 4; Swimming 
Team 3; Honor 1, 2; President of 
Freshman Class 1! Secretary of Sen- 
ior Class 4; Freshman Literary So- 
ciety; Richmond Hi-Y 2, 3, 4; Vice- 
President 4. 



COLLIER, A. B. 

Corporal 1, 4; Sergeant 2; [Tennis 
Team 4; Golf Team 4; Vice-Presi- 
dent of Freshman Class 2; Bachelors 
Club 2; Academy Hi-Y 3, 4; Secre- 
tary 3; Chaplain 4. 



CONLON, THEODORE K. 

Corporal 1, 3: Sergeant 2; High 
Honor 1; Honor 2; Freshman Liter- 
ary- Society. 



CRAFT, GEORGE HENRY 
Corporal 2; Sergeant 3, 4. 



O R S 



RICHMOND 



CRAWFORD, JAMES V. 
Corporal 3, 4. 



DALES, FRANCIS 

"Rainbow" Staff 3; Freshman Lit- 
erary Society; Alpha Lambda Sig- 
ma 2, 3; Camera Club 2, 3. 



DUNAWAY, WALTER J. 

Corporal 4; Band 2, 3, 4; Freshman 
Literary Society; Glee Club 1, 2, 3, 
4; On Stunt Night Program 1, 2, 
3, 4. 



ELROD, HUGH F. 

Corporal 1; Sergeant 2, 6; Track 
Team 4; Freshman Literary Society; 
Bachelors Club S; Camera Club 6. 



ERGLE, JAMES E. 
Co-op Club 5. 



CROZIER, HAROLD E. 



DAVIS, WILLIAM H. 



EAVENSON, WALLACE S. 

Corporal 1,2 ; Sergeant 3, 4; Com- 
pany Football 1, 3, 4, 5; jSpanish 
Club 3. 



ENGLER, HAROLD S. 

Sergeant 1, 4; Corporal 3, 4; Com- 
pany Football 4; High Honor 1, 2, 3; 
Beta Club 3; Spanish Club 3. 



EVANS, ALBERT C. 
Honor 1, 2, 3; Co-op Club 4. 




S E N I 




ACADEMY 



FARRIS, H. T. 

Corporal 2: Sergeant 3; 2nd Lieuten- 
ant 4; Member of Prize Platoon 3; 
Vice-President of Freshman Class 1. 



FLORIE, MARION P. 
Sergeant 2, 3, 4. 



GAVALAS, NIC 

Corporal 1, 2, 3; Band 1, 2, 3, 4; 
Member of Georgia All State Band 4; 
Freshman Literary Society; "Mus- 
keteer" Staff 4; Glee Club 4. 



GOLDSTEIN, STANLEY 

Corporal 2; Sergeant 3, 4; Honor 1, 
3; High Honor 2; Beta Club 3; 
Freshman Literary Society. 



GREENE, SPANN J. 

Sergeant 3; Sergeant-Major 4; 2nd 
Lieutenant 4; Freshman Literary So- 
ciety. 



FLETCHER, W. VAUGHN 

High Honor 2, 3; Award for Out- 
standing Work in Art. 



FULGHUM, BUFORD E. 

Corporal 4; Honor 3; Richmond 
Hi-Y 3. 



GOLDBERG, BENEDICT S., JR. 

Corporal 1, 3, 4; Sergeant 3; "Mus- 
keteer" Stafif 4; Advertising Mana- 
ger 4. 



GRANT, JAMES RALPH 



GRIDLEY, C. ASBURY 



O R S 



RICHMOND 



GULLEDGE, LIONEL 

"B" Varsity Football Team 4; Letter 
for Football 4. 



HAMILTON, WALTON W. 

Sergeant 4; Alpha Lambda Sigma 2, 
3, 4; Camera Club 3, 4; Richmond 
Hi-Y 4; On Stunt Night Program 
3,4. 



HARRISON, BILLY 



HEATON. SAMUEL A. 

Corporal 4; Alpha Lambda Sigma 4; 
Chemistry Club, Charter Member 4; 
Academy Hi-Y 4. 



HILL, JOHN H. 



HAMILTON, HUGH LAMAR 



HAMMACK, BENJAMIN PAUL 

Corporal 3, 4; Honor 2; Red "X" 
Club 3, 4; On Stunt Night Pro- 
gram 3. 



HEATH, ALFRED Y. 



HILL, JAMES J., JR. 

Corporal 4; Sergeant 4; High Honor 
1; Highest Honor 2, 3; Beta Club 3, 
4; Alpha Lambda Sigma 3, 4; Aca- 
demy Hi-Y 4; Chaplain 4; Valedic- 
torian 4. 



HOGAN, WILLIAM DUDLEY 




S E N I 




ACADEMY 



HOGAN, JOE BILLY 
Corporal 2, 3, 4; High Honor 2. 



HOOPS, J. R. 

Sergeant 2, 4, 5. 



HORTON, LLOYD 

Corporal 1, 2; Sergeant 3; Freshman 
Literary Society; Alpha Lambda 
Sigma 2; Stamp Club 3, 4. 



INMAN, FRANK E. 

Corporal 1, 2; Sergeant 3, 4; 2nd 
Lieutenant 4; Best Drilled Freshman 
Cadet 1; Corporal of Best Drilled 
Freshman Squad 1; Sabre Club 4; 
"B" Varsity Basketball Team 2; "A" 
Varsity Basketball Team 3, 4; Letter 
for Basketball 3, 4; Varsity Club 3, 4; 
Honor 1, 2; Freshman Literary So- 
ciety; Secretary; Academy Hi-Y 2, 
3. 4; Chaplain 2, Treasurer 3; Secre- 
tary 4, President 4; "Rainbow" Staff 
3; "Musketeer" Staff 4, Business 
Manager 4; Gold "R" Society 4; 
Chemistry Club 4. 



JAMES, FREDDIE E. 

Corporal 1, 3; High Honor 1, 2, 3; 
Co-op Club 4. 



HOKE, EUGENE P., JR. 

Sergeant 2, 3; 2nd Lieutenant 4; 

Sabre Club 4; Freshman Literary 
Society. 



HOOVER, JACK S. 

Corporal 1, 2, 3; Sergeant 4; Com- 
pany Football 2, 3; Red "X" Club 
3, 4. 



HUMMEL, MICHAEL H. 

Band 2, 4; Swimming Team 3, 4; 
Richmond Hi-Y 4. 



JACKSON, EDMUND W. 

Corporal 2; High Honor 2; Honor 
3; Alpha Lambda Sigma 3, 4. 



JENNINGS, W. D. 

Corporal 4; Honor 1; Richmond 
Hi-Y 2, 3, 4; Treasurer 3; Sergeant- 
at-Arms 4. 



O R S 



RICHMOND 



JOHNSON, FRED L. 
Sergeant 2. 



JONES, WALTER K. 

Corporal 4; Band 1, 2, 3; Freshman 
Literar5' Society. 



JORDAN, MERRrMAN A. 

Richmond Hi-Y 3, 4, 5; Treasurer S. 



KELLY, JAMES A. 



KING, HUBERT U. 

Corporal 3, 4; Sergeant 4: High 
Honor 1; Highest Honor 3; Fresh- 
man Literary Society, President; Al- 
pha Lamda Sigma 3, 4; President 3, 
4; Ionian Civics Club; Charter Mem- 
ber 3, Secretary 3; Academy Hi-Y 4, 
Treasurer 4, Club Reporter 4; "Mus- 
keteer" Staff 4, Club Reporter 4, 
Photographer 4; "Rainbow" Staff, 
Asst. Editor-in-Chief 4; On Stunt 
Night Program 4; Beta Club 4; Vice- 
President 4; Savannah High School 
2; Private 1st Class 2; Savannah 
High School Biology Club 2. 



JOHNSON, JAMES D., JR. 
Sergeant 2; Honor I, 2, 3. 



JONES, WILLIAM M. 

Sergeant 1, 2, S; Corporal 3; Honor 
1 ; Freshman Literary Society. 



KEARNS, JOHNNIE 

Corporal 1, 2; Sergeant 4, 5; "B" 
Varsity Basketball Team 3, 4; Swim- 
ming 1, 6; Tennis Team 3, 4, 5, 6, 7. 



KENNEDY, FRED 



KREISBERG, WILLIAM 




S E N I 




ACADEMY 



KREWSON, LUTHER 



LANG, JAMES L. 



LEVERETT, J. D. 



LEWIS, GUY S. 

Corporal 1, 4; Member of Prize Pla- 
toon 2, 3; Track Team 3, 4; Honor 
3; Freshman Literary Society; Alpha 
Lambda Sigma 2, 3, 4; Vice-Presi- 
dent 3, 4; Treasurer 4; Richmond 
Hi-Y 3, 4; Chaplain 4; Annual Staff 
4; "Musketeer" Staff 4. 



LOWERY, M. ROSCOE 

Sergeant 3, 4; 2nd Lieutenant 4; 
Rifle Team 4; Sabre Club 4; Com- 
pany Football 4; Alanager of "A" 
Varsity Football Team 3, 4; Letter 
for Football 4; Academy Hi-Y 4; 
Glee Club 4; Red "X" Club 4. 



LAAIB, VERNON L. 

Private 1st Class S; Corporal 5; 
Sergeant S. 



LAUGHLIN, VV. J. 
Corporal 1 : Sergeant 2. 



LEVY, JEAN W. 

Sergeant 2; Company Football 2; 
Honor 1, 2; Freshman Literary So- 
ciety; Alpha Lambda Sigma 3, 4; 
Secretary 4. 



LIVINGSTON, D. D. 
Corporal 1; Honor 1, 2. 



LUKE, JAMES F. 
Corporal 3, 4; Band 1, 2,' 3, 4. 



O R S 



RICHMOND 



^rARK\VALTER. W. J. 



MAULDIX. WILLIAM S. 

Sergeant 1. 2, 3, 4; 1st Lieutenant -1; 
Captain 5; Major 6; Member of Best 
Drilled Platoon and Company 2; 
Sabre Club 4. 5, 6; Rifle Team S, 6; 
Company F^otliall 1 : Company Bas- 
ketball 4: "B" \'arsity Football 
Team 1 ; "A" \'arsity Football 2, 4, 
5, 6; Letter for Football 4, 5, 6; Var- 
sity Club 4. 5. 6: Track Team 2. .3. 



McMICHAEL, LEM E. 



MITCHUM, BERNARD 

Sergeant 1, 2; Captain 3, 4; Rifle 
Team 1. 2, 3, 4; "B" Varsity Foot- 
ball Team 1,2: "A" \'arsity Football 
Team 3, 4: Student Council 3, 4: 
Academy Hi-Y 3, 4; Sabre Club 3, 4. 



MONTGOMERY. A. T. 



MARSH. JERRY, JR. 

Corporal 1, 2; Sergeant 3, 4: Com- 
pany Basketball 2: "B" \'arsity Bas- 
ketball Team 2: "B" \"arsity Foot- 
ball Team 3: ^Manager 3: Freshman 
Lilerarv Society. 



McLEXDOX. GEORGE 



MEDLIX. CALVIN B. 



MOBLEY, I. J. 



Honor 1. 



MOREHOUSE. J. H. 

Swimming Team 3; Richmond Hi-V 
3,4. 




S E N I 




ACADEMY 



MORGAN, DAN B. 
High Honor 1, 2; Honor 3. 



MULHERIN, P. R. 
Sergeant 1, 2, 3, 4. 



MURPHY, W. A. 

Honor 1, 3; High Honor 2; Beta 
Club 3. 



NEWMAN, ROY 



O'CONNOR, ROBERT F. 

Corporal 2, 3; Sergeant 4, 5; "A" 
Varsity Basketball Team 4; Manager 
4; Letter for Basketball 4; Rich- 
mond Hi-Y 2. 3, 4, 5; Chaplain 3; 
Treasurer 4; Secretarj' 5. 



MULHERIN, C. S. 

Corporal 1, 3, 4: Sergeant 2; Golf 
Team 2, 3, 4; High Honor 1, 2; 
Honor 3. 



MULLIGAN, JACK J. 
Honor 1, 2. 



NEVIN, WILLIAM A. 
High 1, 2; High Honor 3. 



NORMAN, JACK 

Asst. Manager "A" Varsity Foot- 
ball Team 4; North Augusta High 
Shoool 1, 2, 3; Science Club 1; 
Travelers Club 2, 3. 



OGLETREE, SAM 
Member of Prize Platoon 4. 



O R S 



RICHMOND 



OWENS. ROBERT 

Corporal 1; Sergeant 2. 3, 4; Com- 
pany Football 2, 3; Company Bas- 
ketball 2. 3; Member of Prize Pla- 
toon 2. 3. 



PATRICK, ROBERT H. 

Corporal 3; Sergeant 4, 5. 



PHILLIPS, MARCUS F. 
High Honor 2, 3; Chemistry Club 4. 



POPKIN, BEN 

Corporal 3; Sergeant; "B" Varsity 
Basketball Team 2; "A" Varsity 
Basketball Team 3, 4: Honor 1; 
Alpha Lambda Sigma 2; "Musketeer" 
Staff 4. 



PRATHER, CLARENCE 
Band 2, 3, 4. 



PARRISH, J. H. 



PHILLIPS, JAMES W. 

Sergeant 2, 4; 2nd Lieutenant Sabre 
Club 5: Company Basketball 2: 
Co-op Club 5. 



POMERANCE, SANFORD 



POWELL, LEONARD F. 

Corporal 2, 3; Best Drilled Fresh- 
man Cadet; Track Team 3, 4; Fresh- 
man Literary Society; Glee Club +. 



PRATHER, DULUTH 




S E N I 




ACADEMY 



PURKALL, JAMES B. 

Corporal 2, 3; Sergeant 4; Band 1, 
2, 3, 4; High Honor 1; Honor 2; 
Freshman Literary Society; Alpha 
Lambda Sigma 2, 3, 4. 



REID, ROBERT 



RICE, ROBERT LEO 

"B" Varsity Football Team 4; Fresh- 
man Literary Society. 



ROSS, LOUIS GEORGE 

Corporal 1, 2; Sergeant 3, 4; 2nd 
Lieutenant S; Sabre Club S; "A" 
Yarsit\' Football Team 2, 3, 4, 5; 
Captain of Team 4; Letter for Foot- 
ball 2, 3, 4, 5; Varsity Club 2, 3, 4, 5; 
All G.I. A. A. Team 4, S; Student 
Council 1, 2, 3, 4, 5; Academy Hi-Y 
2, .4, S; Sergeant-at-Arms S. 



SCROGGS, PHIL 

Honor 2; Beta Club 3; Academy 
Hi-Y 3, 4. 



RANKIN, GEORGE D. 

Corporal 3; Sergeant 4; "A" Varsity 
Football Team 3, 4. 



RICE, PAT W. 



ROBINS, JAMES R. 
Corporal 1, 4; Honor 1; Sergeant 4. 



ROUNTREE, LEON D. 

Corporal 1; Sergeant 1, 2; Member 
of Prize Platoon 3, 4; Freshman 
Literary Society; Glee Club 3. 



SEAGO, HARVEY M. 
Corporal 4. 



O R S 



RICHMOND 



SEALS, MARVIN 

Rifle Team 3, 4, 5, 6; "B" Varsity 
Football Team 5; "A" Varsity Foot- 
ball Team 6; Track Team 4, 5, 6. 



SHERMAN, ROBERT H. 

Freshman Literary Society; Rich- 
mond Hi-Y 2. 3, 4. 



SIZEMORE, ROBERT E. 



SMOAK, DAN J. 



STEARNS, RICHARD 



SEXTON, CLYDE II 

"A" \^arsity Football Team 3, 4; 
\'ice-President of Junior Class 3. 



SHIELDS, HORACE H. 



SMITH, WILLIAM HENRY 

Corporal 3; Sergeant 4: ]M ember of 
Best Drilled Companj- 2; Member 
of Best Drilled Platoon 3; Company 
Football 2; Co-op Club 4. 



STARK. ROBERT 

"B" Varsity Football Team 3, 4: 
"A" Varsity Football Team 5. 



STEINBERG, MORRIS 

Corporal 3, 4; Freshman Literary 
Society; Camera Club 3; Alpha 
Lambda Sigma 4; Winner Academy 
Declamation Cup 4. 




I^Al^ 




S E N I 



EF^ 




Mi&i 




O R S 



ACADEMY 



STEVENS, DAVID B. 

Sergeant 3, 4; Band 1, 2, 3, 4; High 
Honor 2, 3; Freshman Literary So- 
ciety; Alpha Lambda Sigma 2, 3, 4; 
Co-op Clulj 3, 4; Secretary-Treasurer 
3; Glee Club 3, 4; "Musketeer" Staff 
4; Lieutenant 4. 



STRINGER, E. FORREST 

2nd Lieutenant 3; 1st Lieutenant 4 
Sabre Club 3, 4; Band 1, 2, 3, 4 
Drum Major 3, 4; Orchestra 1, 2, 4 
Honor 1, 2. 



STROTHER, FORREST C. 

Sergeant 1, 2, 3; Band 1, 2, 3, 4; "A" 
\'arsity Football Team 3, 4, 5; "A" 
Varsity Basketball Team 2, 3, 4, S; 
Varsity Club 2, 3, 4, S. All G.I.A.A. 
Football Team 5; Orchestra 1, 2, 3. 



STURGIS, J. B. 
Corporal 1, 4; Co-op Club 3. 



TOOLE, M. G. 



STRINGER, C. E. 

Corporal 3; Sergeant 3, 4; Band 1, 2; 
Camera Club 3. 



STRINGER, JOHN E. 

Sergeant 2, 3, 4; Student Council 1; 
Richmond Hi-Y 3, 4; Beta Club 4. 



STULB, GEORGE M. 

Honor 1, 2, 3: "B" Varsity Football 
Team 2; Manager 2; Swimming 
Team 3; Letter for Swimming 3; 
Varsity Club 2, 3, 4; Richmond 
Hi-Y 2, 3. 



TANKERSLEY, J. P. 

Corporal 3, 4; Member of Best 
Drilled Company 2; Member of Prize 
Platoon 3: Company Football 4; 
Honor 2. 



TUCKER, J. H. 



RICHMOND 



TURBYFILL. REEVES R. 



WALLACE, WILLIAM J. 

Corporal 1, 2; Sergeant 3, 4, 5; Best 
Drilled Freshman Cadet: Member of 
Best Drilled Squad 2, 3, 4; Member 
of Prize Platoon 3, 4; Company 
Football 2, 3, 4; Company Basket- 
ball 2, 3, 4; Honor 1, 2; Life Savers 
Club 4, 5. 



WARR, ROBERT R. 



WEATHERS, EULY 

Sergeant 1, 2, , 4; 2nd Lieutenant 5; 
Sabre Club 5; Red "X" Club 4, 5. 



WEEMS, LOCKE 



TYNER, G. F. 



WARD, RALPH CLIFFORD 

Corporal 3; Band 4; "Musketeer" 
Staff 4. 



WATKINS. LAMAR E. 

Corporal 1, 2; Sergeant 3, 4; "B" 
Varsity Basketball Team 1: Honor 
1, 3. 



WEBB. C. A. 

Member of Prize Platoon 3; Honor 
1, 2; Academy Hi-Y 3, 4. 



WHITLEY, DONALD M. 

Sergeant 3; Corporal 4; Company 
Football 3. 




S E N I 




ACADEMY 



WIGGINS, ERNEST D. 

Sergeant, 2, 3; 1st Lieutenant 4; 
Captain 5; Member of Best Drilled 
Company 1; Member of Prize Pla- 
toon 2: Sabre Club 4, 5; "B" Varsity 
Football Team 2, 3: Cheer Leader 
4. 5; Varsity Club 4, 5; Honor 2; 
Freshman Literary Society; Alpha 
Lambda Sigma; 2,3; Academy Hi-Y 
2, 3. 4; Treasurer 3; Hangover Club 
4, 5; Glee Club 4, 5; Camera Club S; 
"Musketeer" Staff 4; Circulation 
Manager 4; Business Manager 5; 
\\'inner of Stunt Night 3, 4. 



WILLIAMS. A. L. 



WILSON, CARL C. 



WOLFF, BERNARD 

Sergeant 2, 4; Corporal 3; Company 
Football 1, 2; Company Basketball 
2; Honor 1; Freshman Literary So- 
ciety; Alpha Lambda Sigma 2, 3, 4; 
Vice-President 4; Checker Club 2; 
"Rainbow" Staff 3; Debating Team 
2, 3; On Stunt Night Program 2, 3, 4. 



WRIGHT, G. S. 

Corporal 1, 2; Company Basketball 



WILKINSON, ROBERT J. 

Corporal 2; Sergeant 3; 2nd Lieu- 
tenant 4; Band 1, 2. 3, 4; Orchestra 
1, 2; Freshman Literary Society; 
Glee Club 4; Camera Club 4. 



WILLIS, D. F. 



WOLFE, EUGENE S. 

Member of Best Drilled Platoon and 
Company 3; Student Council 1; 
Academy Hi-Y 2, 3, 4. 



WOODWARD, T. R. 



YOUNG, BILL 

Company Football 1; Company 
Basketball 3; "B" Varsity Football 
Team 2, 3; "A" Varsity Football 
Team 4. 



O R S 



Senior Class Prophecy 



Mav. 1960. 



Just twenty _\ears ago at Richnmncl Academy a yearbook was inililished which was called the 
"1940 Rainbow". Somewhere among the pages of that ponderous \olume was a Senior Class Prophecy 
which was written by a certain J.C.A. Freshman whom we shall call Richard Roe. On the faculty of 
the school at that time was E. M. Allen, professor of French and faculty adviser for the "1940 Rainbow". 
When the "Rainbow" was printed and Prof. Allen saw the Senior Class Prophecy, he uttered a blood- 
curdling yell and tore out after poor Roe with bloodv murder in his eve. 

This chase lasted for twenty long years over land and sea. Finally, just this morning, they happened 
to come back to Augusta; and from the signs on Broad Street, it was evident that everything which 
poor Richard had prophesied had been realized. Accordingly, Prof. Allen decided to give up the chase, 
and he retired to the Mulherin Home for Weary Professors, Steve and Pat, proprietors. Thus freed 
from his great danger, Richard strolled up and down Rroad Street greeting his friends of the class 
of 1940. 

The first person he encountered was Ralph Chaney of the law firm of Chance, Chance, Chaney, and 
Chaney. Ralph said that their last client had been Leonard Powell in his suit against Major W. A. 
Elliott. Powell collected $100,000 because his arches had fallen from so much extra drill back at the 
Academy. Further down the street was a sign which read thus : "Rice and Rice, Piano Tuners. Let 
Pat and Leo Put You Back on the Right Key." In the window of the Rices' store was a poster announc- 
ing the coming championship l:)oxing match between "Slugger" Xorman and "Bloodv Butch" Watkins. 
The bout will be staged in Cliff Ward's new giant arena, and the third man in the ring will be that dean 
of referees. Willie Wallace. 

On the directory of the old S.F.C. Building (now called "Cooper's Castle", since Billy Cooper and 
his partner. Bo Farris, added twenty more stories to it) the following doctors were listed : Baliy 
S]3ecialists — S. Pomerance, W. H. Cato, and E. S. Wolfe; Dog Doctors — R. H. Patrick. R. L. Comley, 
J. Kearns, and Francis Dales. Among the many law firms listed was the firm of Stringer, Stringer, 
Stringer, and Turbyfill. The soda fount in the lobbv was owned by Leon D. Rountree. and the chief 
soda-jerker was Nic Gavalas. As Richard passed through the building, Nic waved a greeting to him. 
At the back of the building was Aledlin's Barber Shop. Seated in one of the chairs was Guy Lewis, a 
local bricklayer. Other barbers in the shop liesides Medlin were Carl Wilson, Lance Card, Charles Al- 
len, and Jack Black. 

Richard turuiid around and came out of the building, and just as he got outside he happened to 
look up and see an airplane flying over with a sign announcing the coming of Robert Wilkinson and 
his famous orchestra to Bill Brotherton's new Supper Club on the Washington Road. Wilkinson's musi- 
cians are Hugh Elrod and Walton Hamilton, trumpets; Walter Jones and Marshall Brandenburg, clari- 
nets; George McLendon, bazooka ; Luke Krewson, washboard ; Jack Hoops, jug; Herbert Collier, ocarina ; 
David Ste\-ens, drums ; and Clyde Sexton, vocalist. Also featured with the band are Brennan Purkall 
and Spann Greene, comedians. 

Glancing down again, Richard saw a row of pawn shops just below Sears-Roebuck, which, by the 
way, is under the capable management of George Wright and Jimmy Lang. These pawn shops were all 
under the supervision of Stanley Goldstein, ^Morris Goldstein, Ben Pojikin, and Lloyd Horton. They sold 
everything from straight pins to Xevin's all-steel airplanes. Just below these shops was the nld Miller 
Theatre, now the Hammack Opera House, which was closed for repairs. 

.\fter leaving the Opera House, Richard was unable to find any more of his old friends; so he went 
over to the editorial offices of the Augusta Chronicle to inquire about them. The first person he met 
in the office was Marcus Phillips, reporter for the paper. When Richard inquired about the rest of the 
class of 1940, Marcus replied, "Well, they've all gone dift'erent ways. Of course, you've heard about 
Hank Caver? He's a cowboy in the movies. Idis Cater is also in the movies; he's a leading man. Paul 
Amos and Charlie .AUerton are radio announcer.- "^^ CBS. Robert Reid, George Rankin, and Bob Stark 
teach ballet-dancing in Philadelphia. Freddie Ja is a deep-sea diver in the navy. Frank Inman 

makes dolls, and Mike Hummel demonstrates \ "Chubby" Engler is manager of the San Fran- 

cisco Seals and sells buttons in the winter time. 

"Bill Young, Jerry Marsh, and Roscoe Lowery are professional pretzel benders, and George Barnes 
is a wholesale dealer in beer mugs. Ed Barton kills cows in Chicago, and James Hill teaches school in 



the same city. Phil Scroggs is president of DuPunt. and Sammy Heaton is vice-president in charge 
of waste-baskets. Bill Austin is a tropical explorer, and Teddy Conlon runs a steamship line. Al 
Adams and T. R. Woodward count sheep for the A. L. Williams Wool Company, and Fred Anderson is 
a tax-collector in AVashington. Billy Bell is a street-sweeper in Kalamazoo, Michigan, and Robert 
O'Connor is an undertaker's assistant. Bernard Mitchum is a pie-taster for Claussen's Bakery, and 
Tom Mobley is a Colonel in the Armj^ 

"Ralph Grant is manager of Kress, Inc., Dan Morgan is State Superintendent of Schools; and Wal- 
ter J. Dunaway is Chairman of the Federal Reserve Board. Wallace Eavenson makes tooth-picks, and 
Bernard Collier is a taxi-driver in Atlanta. George Croft is Secretary of Labor, and Duluth Prather is 
Professor Quiz. Robert Owens makes billiard balls, and Clarence Prather sells score cards at Yankee 
Stadium. D. M. Whitley pitches for the Giants, and "Josh" Strother plays center for the Celtics. 
George Stulb runs a steam shovel for the R. C. Sizemore Construction Company, and Dick Goldberg 
is a time-keeper for the same concern. Jean Levy is a flagman on a W.P.A. project, and Dick Cham- 
bers is a policeman in Omaha, Nebraska. 

"Shivers Anderson is a card sharp, and Bill Harrison is a street-car conductor. One of the foremost 
football coaches in the country is A. T. Montgomer}- at USC. Eugene Avery, chairman of the C.LO., 
is always at odds with Bill Jones, president of A.F.L. John Hill is a photographer for "Life", and Hoke 
is a member of the New York Stock Exchange. D. F. Willis is warden at Sing-Sing, and quite a few 
members of the class have served time under him. James Phillips is editor of "College Humor", Bill 
Mauldin is a chiropractor, and A. C. Evans is a fireman on the Santa Fe Railroad. James Ergle is an 
aviator, and J. H. Parrish flies a Pan-American air-liner. Charles Carter exterminates termites, and 
Jim ^Mulligan has invented a fool-proof water pistol." 

"Bill}- Kreisburg is Ambassador to Germany, Fred Kennedy repairs watches, and "Digger" Jordan 
digs ditches. Alton Kelly is the singer on the Hit Parade, and E. W. Jenkins is head of the Streets and 
Drains Department of Houston, Texas. Dick Stearns makes suits, and Jimmy Robins beats rugs. 
W. A. Murphey teaches at the University of Georgia, and L. E. McMichael drives a truck. Clifford 
Webb grinds lenses for the Horace Shields Optical Company. Louis Ross sells hamburgers in Boston, 
and Bob Sherman is Professor of Chinese, Japanese and Mayonnaise at North Augusta High School. 
Dan Smoak draws cartoons for "Esquire" and anybody else who'll buy them. 

"Fish Wiggins is a call-boy in the Waldorf-Astoria Hotel, Euly Weathers sells ice cream in Central 
Park, and Grover Tyner is a guide at the Aiken World's Fair. Mike Toole makes sandwiches in South 
America, and Bob Warr busts bronchos in New Mexico. J. P. Tankersley paints white-walled tires, Dugie 
Jennings writes math books for Mr. Mosely, and Fred Johnson sells shoes in Baltimore. James Luke 
makes popcorn, and W. J. Laughlin sells cotton cloth. Sam Ogletree is a gentleman farmer, and Jim 
Morehouse runs a filling-station. J. B. Sturgis designs tuxedos, and Billy Hogon runs a novelty shop 
in Paris. Alfred Heath and Archie Atkinson build bridges, and Allston Bailie runs an alligator farm 
in Florida. Edgar and James Broome sell mops, and Louis Browne grows muskmelons. Robert Carry, 
Joe Belding, James Avrett, and Bill Beckum are officers in the Portuguese Navy. 

"Arnold Barrett writes dictionaries, James Bartley has an orchestra, and Locke Weems imitates 
animals on the stage and radio. J. H. Tucker is a chemist, and Manuel Blanos is an acrobat. Monroe 
Bowyer is a giant in a circus, Sam Cawley teaches people how to fly. and D. D. Livingstone is a fire- 
man in Columbia. Vernon Lamb and Joe Billy Hogan make sound-effects for NBC, and Bill Smith 
makes piano stools. W. J. Markwalter is a glass-blower, Marvin Seals is an electrician with TVA, and 
Donald Leverett designs ladies' hats. James Johnson grows cantaloupes, and Bill Britton sells flower 
pots. Vaughn Fletcher is a heavyweight boxer, Buford Fulghum is an archaeologist, and Harold Cro- 
zier is a philologist. Among the foremost geologists of the world are Hugh Hamilton, Clarence Gridley, 
and Henry Carter. Columns for the New York Times are written by Lionel Gulledge, Bill Davis, James 
Crawford, Marion Florie, Dan Browne, and Vance Bullock, Dennis Calamas and Bill Bush run a fruit 
store in Kansas Cit}-. I think that accounts for everybody. If there were any more in the class, I guess 
the}- must still be in the Academy." 

"I think that takes care of all the students," said Richard, "but what happened to- all the teachers 
who used to be up at the school?" 

"Most of them went crazy, some of them ^ i .litted suicide, and some of them just got disgusted 
and quit," answered Phillips. "But I'll have to be g' ing now. I've got to go see Mr. Hardy about 
writing an article on the joys of being president ot a high school." 

With these words Phillips was gone, and Kichard was left standing in the office and thinking 
about the time he (accidentally, of course) hit Mr. Hardy with that rotten banana. 



Our Branch 

The tree of life has slowly aged, 
Yet trunk still firm it ever stan3s ; 
Forever strong when tempest raged. 
No mortal saw when life began ; 
Nor does he know that roots may rend 
And mortal life tO' meet its end. 

Each opened bough from ancient stem 
A branch of life on Earth today, 
And crumliled leaves and fallen liml;)s 
They are the past who went life's way ; 
But see the tender shoots that grow 
Replacing weary branches so. 

Oh slender twigs that are our youth, 
New leaflets there together clung. 
Each day the branches grow forsooth ; 
Someday those limbs will not be young, 
But we, the leaves, in ev'ry class 
Will cling as long as branches last. 

— James Hill 



Last Will and Testament of the Class of Nineteen Hundred 
Forty of the Academy of Richmond County 



:5iATE OF GEORGIA, 
COUNTY OF RICHMOND. 

We, the class of nineteen hundred forty of the Academy of Richmond County, being of sound 
and disposing mind; realizing the imminence of the day upon which we shall be compelled to tear 
ourselves away from these pleasant surroundings to fight for our existence in the cruel world; under- 
standing that those whom we leave behind us are practically devoid of certain qualities which we possess 
and which are no longer of any use to us ; and being anxious to' avail ourselves of this last opportunity 
to contribute something of value to those we love so well, do hereby make, declare, ordain, and publish 
this instrument as our last Will and Testament ,TO-WIT : 



ITEM 
ITEM 
ITEM 
ITEM 



1. 
2. 

3. 

4. 



To "Duck" Bailie, Bob Sherman leaves his uncanny knack for repairing streamlined 
automobiles. 

To some deserving Junior, Robert Sizemore leaves the position of Regimental Sergeant- 
Major, megaphone and all. 

To Paul Plunkett, Monroe Bowyer leaves four inches of his height so that Paul won't 
have to stand on his tip-toes to put his money on the lunch-room counter. 



To Asbury Gridley, Woodall Greene leaves his fair face and beautiful hair, trusting that 

Asbury will be as much of a lady-killer as Woodall was. 

ITEM 5. To an)^ vv-ho may need them, Hugh Hamilton leaves one bundle of unused excuses, with 
the hope that they will all be acceptable to the office. 

ITEM 6. To Little Georgie Ewing, the entire Senior Class leaves one automatic paper-corrector, so 
that Georgie will have more time to spend with the debutantes. 

ITEM 7. To Kessel Stelling and Arthur Mosely, Hubert King and Bernard Wolff bequeath the Alpha 
Lambda Sigma, trusting that Kessel and Arthur will be able to instill in the students of 
the Academy of Richmond County a love and appreciation for things literary. 

ITEM 8. To Gene Evans, Junior Powell leaves his "Jitterbugging" ability, provided that Gene 
will agree to "swing out" publicly at least once a day. 

ITEM 9. To the members of the "B" Varsity Basketball team, Frank Inman, Ben Popkin, and Josh 
Strother leave our perennial hopes for a GIAA title. 

ITEM 10. To "Or Man Mose" Moseley, his Math classes leave one brand new shiny tractor in the 
fond hope that his crop this season will be a huge success. 

ITEM 11. To Julian Gwin, Eugene Avery bequeaths the position of center on the varsity football 
squad with the hope that Julian will hold down the position as ably, but not as long, as 
Gene did. 

ITEM 12. To "Manager" Scott, Roscoe Lowery and Jerry Marsh leave one water bucket, one roll of 
tape, and a wheelbarrow in order that Scott may be able to satisfy the wants of next 
year's football team. 



ITEM 13 
ITEM 14 



To anyone who will take them, Fish Wiggins leaves several megaphones and a lusty voice, 
hoping that said person will be able to put some pep into the cheering at next year's games. 



To all the lower classmen, we, the distinguished graduates, bequeath our ability to study, 
notwithstanding the fact that some of us have been in the Academy for as many as seven 
years. 

IN WITNESS WHEREOF, We have hereunto set our hand and seal this 22nd day of February, 
in the year of our Lord nineteen hundred and forty. 

Signed: 

THE SENIOR CLASS OF A.R.C. 



WITNESSES: 

I. Bee, M.D. ; Oscar Q. Punchdrunk; and Confucius. 




THE 



Junior 
Glass Officers 

President Joe Murray 

Vice-President H. D. Graves 

Secretary Theo Thevaos 

Treasurer Clarence Murphy 

Student Council R. W. Barton 

Student Council Ashby Taylor 



"Full of spirit and life, but serious when it comes 
to doing their duty", characterizes the group of 
officers for the Junior, Sophomore, and Freshman 
Academj" classes for the year 1940. Although full 
of outstanding people, the classes are noted for the 
presence of the Reiser boys, especially, because both 
are presidents of their respective classes, and they 
have a "big brother," Walter, who is president of 
J. C. A. Freshman class. The football team is well 
represented by Joe Murray and Julian Gwin. and 
Ashby Taylor is a "star" on the A. R. C. golf team. 



All of these boys have a certain 
quality of school spirit which 
lends itself to that of their 

fellow-classmen. 




LOWER CLASSES 



Sophomore 
O^ Vs 



President 
A^ice-President 
Secretary . . 



iyShealey Reiser 
'Carl E. Sanders 
Bennie Lucas 



Treasurer Clinton Lewis 

Student Council Billy Chandler 

Student Council . . . Paul M. Thompson 




JSL 



■*«t-" 




JUNIOR 




Adams, C. J. 
Agostas, Mike 
Agostas, W. N. 
Allgood, C. H. 
Avery, A. W. 
Aycock, M. 
Baber, M. E. 
"-'->. D. H. 



Branch, F. E. 
Brinson, Carnie 
Brittinghani, T. W. 
Browning, J. H. 
Bryan, R. D. 
Bryant, J. E. 
Bryant, Jasper 
Burgess, Charles 
Burroughs, John 
Bush, John R. 
Bussey, Henry S. 
Caldwell, Joseph 
pers, J. D. 
ips, W. H. 
vous, Andrew 
Walter 
Tames 
thur 
rnard 



Cribb, Marvin 
Crozier, Harold 
Culpepper, John 
Dantzler, Hubert 
Dicks, Edward 
Dolan, Billie A. 1 
Duvall, Carleton 
Ellison, LeRoy 
Faddis, Wm. H. 
Fielder, Arthur 
Florie, Julian 
Ford, C. M. 
Ford, Theron 
Geer, Willian' 
Gibson, A. li 
Godbee, (jeor 
Gordon, G. 
Grant, RaW 
(jraves, H.., 



] 



Hagler, G. B. 
Hardy, Wallace 
Hargrove, R. W. 
Harmon, J. A. 
Harrell, E. S. 
Harison, W "" 
Havnt- 



/ 



CLASS 




Izlar, Wm. A. 
Jenkins, Charles 
Jennings, James 
Johnson, Freddie 
Jonston, Howard 
Joiner, Dan 
Jopling, Richard 
Keener, Theodore 
Kessler, Robert 
Key, Lester H. 
King, W. L. 
Kinsman, Walter 
Knight, Ardell 
Koger, Miles 
Krewfon, Luther 
Landrum, Joseph 
Lang, James 
Lemmons, John 
Lewis, Ernest 
Mahoney, Jack 
Marriott, Tom 



Marshall, Otto 
Me3'ers, Walden 
Miller, Edward 
Miller, Harry 
Morgan, John 
Moring, Charles 
Morris, James 
Moseley, A. J. 
Murphey, C. C. 
Murray, J. 
Murrah, J. M. 
McGahee, Harvey 
McKeown, Jrhn A. 
McKie, VVill'am 
McKinney, A. S. 
McLendon, G. P. 
McNair, J. L. 
Ouzts. F. B. 
Overton, J. S. 
Phinizy, Charles 
Plunkett, P. K. 



Prontaut, L. S. 
Rachels, J. B. 
Reese, J. H. 
Reynolds, T. E. 
Rice, J. W. 
Rosendaul, Gerald A. 
Ross. J, E. 
Rupert, J. 
Sanders, G. 
Scoggins, F. M. 
Scott, J. D. 
Servant, L. F. 
Shockley, E. J. 
Short, W. D. 
Sizemore, Rufus 
Smalle>% Joe W. 
Smith, James A. 
Speering, Frank 
Spinks, David 
Stelling, Kessel 
Stephens, James 



Stoudemire, Joe 
Stowell, Carleton 
Strayhorn, William 
Taylor, John A. 
Thevaos, Theo G. 
Thompson, Lewis 
Timmerman, T. L. ■ 
Tom, Bill 
Toomey, A. M. 
Walker, Jos. R. 
Whaley, Walker 
White, A. O. 
Wilhams. G. R. 
Wilcon, Cecil 
Wingate, Raymond 
Witt, Wm. M. 
Woerpel, Jack 
Wright, Lewis 




SOPHOMORE 




Agee, J. L. 
Aldridge, J. J. 
Allen. H. E. 
Allen. J. Q. 
Anierson, H. C. 
Andrews, A. C. 
Andrews, A. R. 
Armstrong, \V. W. 
Ashmead, E. W. 
Atkinson, J. M. 
Averett, N. E. 
Averett, W. E. 
Baker, W. R. 
Balk, R. S. 
Barrett, H. 
Barton, C. E. 
Bateman, J. H. 
Bateman, P. H. 
Beasley. J. I. 
Bcckworth. C. 
Betlingfield, W. R. 
Blackstone. H. L. 
Blackftone, J. E. 
Brake, B. E. 
Bowles, J. F. 
Bresnahan, J. J. 
Brodie, P. A. 
Brooks, M. M. 
Burnside, J. C. 
Camp. Harry 
Carswell, George 
Carter, Jack 
Cato, Edgar 
Cave, Dewey 



Chalmers, Joe 
Chambers, Richard 
Chandler. Billy 
Chavous. Richard 
Cheney, Patrick 
Clark, Don 
Claussen, Ward 
CIov. William 
Colclough, W. B. 
Cole, Parker 
Cordle, Clark 
Collier, Billy 
Craft, John 
Cranston. J. Craig 
Creech. Otis 
Creed, Albert 
Cross, Joe 
Crouch. C. 
Cumming. Joe 
Currie. Herman 
Daley, Jack 
Daley, Marion 
Dangler. John 
Daniels, Charles 
Davis, Baston 
Davis. J. F. 
Davis, W. L. 
Deas, Harold 
Dennis. E. S. 
Derovanesion, Todd 
Dixon, B. B. 
Dixon, T. S. 
Doolittle, A. M. 
Dorn, C. B. 



Droft, Eugene 
Dudley, E. P. 
Duke, E. A. 
Dunbar. E. H. 
Dye, \". L. 
Earnest, H. E. 
Eckert. W. J. 
Edwards, C. W. 
Evans, C. E. 
Faulkner. C. O. 
Ferch. George 
F'leming, B. 
Eraser. J. M. 
Frierson. E. M. 
Fulcher, C. C. 
Fulmer. J. P 
Gardner. H. A. 
Girardot, W. J. 
Goldberg, Ira 
Goldberg. T. F. 
Goldstein, A. 
Goldstein, L. 
Gredig. Albert 
Green. Marion 
Gregg, Ed B. 
Guren. D. A. 
Harben. Wm. A. 
Hargrove, Julian 
Harris. Charles 
Harrison. Otis 
Hartor R. G. 
Herndon. Willis 
Heslen. Frank 
Hester, A. 



Hill, Edward 
Hoblis, George 
Hodges, Claude 
Hoffman, B. J. 
Holley. Albert 
Holston, James 
Holston. J. L. 
Hoover, J. C. 
Home, Earl 
Houck, K. T. 
Houck. Perry 
Howard. St. Peter 
Hfiwell, Lucian 
Hudson, William 
Hughes. Minton 
Hull. John D. 
Hvdrick. Louie 
Ivey. W. D, 
Jarrett. F. B. 
Jenkin\ Albert 
J hnson, W. C. 
Jones, George E. 
Jones, R. S. 
Jones, William J. 
Jordan, C. M. 
Jne. George 
Kelley, Charles 
Kellev, Glenn 
King,' Robert W. 
Knotts, Uly S. 
Koger, \\'illiam J. 
Laird. Jack 
Lamar, B. D. 
Lariscy, H. L. 



II 



1940 fiAinBOW 



m 



CLASS 




Laughlin, L. J. 
Lee, J. D. 
Leopard, Alonzo 
LeSeur, J. P. 
Levy, Harry 
Lewis, Clinton 
Lewis, William G. 
Long, Russell 
Loo, Wall Chow 
Lovett. H. C. 
Lucas, Bennie 
Luke. Charles 
Luke, Ed. C. 
Lynn, Billy 
McCartv. Chas. 
McCaslan, D. B. 
McGahee. Milo 
McLees, G. C. 
Martin. Fred 
Mass, Henry 
Masters. Roy Chas. 
Meggins, Curtis 
Merritt, Walter 
Merry. Pierce 
Merti'ns. Otto 
Miegel, Irvin 
Miles, Jack 
Miller, Marion 
Mills, Frank L. 
Mills. Frank M. 
Mobley, William 
Mooneyham, Luther 
Moore, Warren 
Morris, John Lee 



Murphy, Alex 
Murphe}', Carl 
Mutimer, Howard 
Myers, C. C. 
Newton, E. S. 
Xowell, William 
Oaklej', Dan 
Odom. Charles 
Oellerich. Alfred 
Oglesbee. Tom 
Ott. Aaron 
Ott, Angus 
Page, Albert 
Palmer, Allen 
Park. Howard 
Parker. Aquilla 
Parnell, B. S. 
Patterson, John 
Petrea. Ge rge 
Postell. Melvin 
Powell. C. E. 
Raburn, D. M. 
Rabun. F. L. 
Rachels. J. C. 
Radford. G. 
Reiser, J. S. 
Rhoden. J. T. 
Richards, T. E. 
Roberts. J. W. 
Roberts. M. L. 
Rogers. R. 
Roper. \. S. 
Rosier. C. C 
Rucker, R. J. 



Rupert, D. M. 
Russell, C. D. 
Sanders, C. E. 
Scott, A. L. 
Scott. L. E. 
Scott. R. S. 
Searcey. C. W. 
Sedberrv, H. C. 
Setze. H. R. 
Shanklin, J. B. 
Sheflfield. T. E. 
Sheridan. E. C. 
Sherman, Frank 
Smith. Dan J. 
Smith, Ernest E. 
Smith. Lathan 
Smith. Ralph 
Smith, T. H. 
Smolen, Victor 
Snipes, W. S. 
Soltow, Wm. D. 
Stafiford. James 
Stephens, Wm. H. 
Stevens, Donne 
Storey, Forrest 
Stringer, John E. 
Swan, Walter 
Swearingen. Chas. B. 
Tabb. John E. 
Thomas. Robt. Joe 
Thomas, Howard 
Thompson, Joe 
Thompson, Paul M. 
Thompson, Phillip H. 



Thompson, William 
Thornton, Cecil C. 
Timmerman, Ben C. 
Tinley, Thos. W. 
Toodle, G. M. 
Toole. R. Alton 
Twiggs, V. Marvin 
Tudor, Alfred T. 
Tvner. R. E. 
Walker. G. W. 
Wall. S. E. 
Wallace. T. J. 
Watkins, H. P. 
Watkins. P. A. 
Watkins. W. W. 
Weathers, J. L. 
Weatherwax. F. G. 
White. J. B, 
Whitehead. E. W. 
Whitton. Ben 
Wilder. P. L. 
Wilkerson. F. 
W^ilkins. L. H. 
^^'ilkinson, J. C. 
Williamson. C. D. 
Williamson. C. J. 
Wilson. B. M. 
Wilson, T. O. 
Wolcott. E. H. 
Wolcott, W. W. 
Wong, B. L. 
Wood. Linsey 
Woodard, J. G. 
Yarbrough, W. M. 
Young, C. T. 




FRESHMAN 



II 




Aaronson, P. A. 
Adams, Alex 
Adams, Julian 
Adams, Sam G. 
Aldridge, T. 
Allgood. Chas. H. 
Allen, Eugene 
Alsabrooks, Lamar 
Attaway, Bobbie 
Armistead, James 
Arnold, Boyd 
Arrington, Harry 
(Atkinson. Albert 
\ustin. Jack 
Bailey, Albert W. 
Bailey, Bernard S. 
Bailey, H. W. 
Barnes, Robert 
Baughman, Herbert 
Baxter, Chas. A. 
Baxter, John 
Beazley, Jack 
Belding, Rufus 
Bennett, Jack 
Bennett, J. O. 
Benson, Calvin 
Best, Hilard 
Belts, H. W. 
Betts, Marion 
Bilton, Ben 
Biven, Glenn 
Black, H. S. 
Black, James B. 
Blackwell, Marion 
Blasingame, William 
Blease, Franklin 
Boardman, Clayton 
Boatwright, Emory 
Boggus, Harry L. 
Bolgla, Clarence 



Bohler, \V. C. 
Booker, Jerry D. 
Bowers, John 
Bowman. William 
Boyd. Robert 
Bradford, William 
Brinkley. Avery 
Brinkman, Paul 
Britt. Marion 
Britton, William H. 
Broker, Ken 
Brown, Clyde 
Bruker, Charles 
Brush, Forrest 
Bryngleson. James 
Buck, George 
Buffington, Claude 
Bugg. William G. 
Burrell, Lansing 
Bussell, J. H. 
Bussey, Homer 
Byrd. Harmon 
Cadden, John 
Capers, Anderson 
Carswell, J. P. 
Carter. Ben 
Carter, Jessie 
Carter, Lloyd 
Casey, G. H. 
Cave, S. 

Chalker, Sterling 
Chambers, George 
Chanibless, Oscar 
Chandler, Arthur 
Chavous, Joe 
Christian, Clifford 
C^hristie. F. E. 
L iiumley. John 
Clark, John C. 
Clay, Harris 
Clay. Luther 



Coclin, Deno C. 
Comley. Jim 
Conner. Chas. 
Conselyea. Herbert 
Cook, Ronnell 
Cox, William 
Craft. Ed. 
Crawford, Charles 
Creech, Bernard 
Crenshaw, Billie 
Crocket, Ben 
Croft. Jack 
Crozier, Trajdor 
Culpepper, Flavins 
Cunningham, George 
Davidion, Charles 
Davis, James E. 
Davis, Jervis 
Deas, George 
Deer, Richard 
DeLoach, Calvin 
DeLong, Raymond 
DeWitt, J. W. 
Dickens, Wlton 
Dickson, Alvin 
Dolan, Frank 
Douglas. Jack 
Dudley, Tom 
Dunbar, Frank 
Dunn, John A. 
Dyson, J. W. 
Eidson, Wyman 
Epps. Marion 
Etheredge, Billy 
Fiske, Julian 
Forster, Joseph 
Gouche, Charles 
Fletcher, Herman 
Flynn, William F. 
Garnto, Curtis 
Gay, Andrew 



Gilliland, Warren 
Gleason, Archie 
Glickert, James 
Glover, Charles C. 
Golman, Ernest 
Goode, Ed 
Goodwin, J. W. 
Granade, W. O. 
Grealish, Oswald 
Greene, W. T. . 
Greer. William B. 
Grimes. C. 
Guillebeau, W. L. 
Gunter, Charles 
Guy, James 
Gwinn. Julian 
Hamilton, W^ 
Hancock, Clvde 
Harrell, Robt. C. 
llarrMl. Sterling 
Harris. James H. 
Harris. Wilford 
Harrison, Edward 
Harrison, P. S. 
Harveston, Frank 
Heard, Bobby 
Herlong. John 
Hcrndon. P. H. 
Hightower, Robert 
Hill. Boby 
Hobs. Leo 
Hodges. James C. 
Hodigk-'ns, Jack B. 
Hodkins, Edwin 
HofftTman, T. S. 
Holland. William 
Holley, Rudolph 
Hollingsworth, William 
Tlood, L D. 
Howard. T. J. 
Howe, Richard L. 



Howland, Jimmie 
Hudson, Delma 
Hudson, Jack 
Huff, Frank 
Inglett, H. C. 
Ivey, Jas. B. 
Izlar, Jack 
Jackson, Jack 
Jackson, Jasper C. 
Jackson, Lloyd 
Jackson. Thomas 
Jarrett, Brany 
Jeffcoat, Henry 
Jeffcoat, Robert 
Johnson, Bennie 
Johnson, Julian 
Johnson, Marion 
Johnson, Rufus 
Johnrton, Walter 
Joe, Harry 
J' nes, Arthur 
Jones, Clarence 
Jones, Clyde 
Jones, Ralph 
Jones. W. W. 
Jue, Teodore 
Keiter, W. G. 
King, M. L. 
Kenny, Edward 
Kirkley, Carl 
Kirkland, Harry 
Lamar, Tracy 
LaMar, W'illiam 
Lamb, Herbert 
Lamountt. Dan 
Landrmn, Whitfield 
Lange, Douglas 
Lazenl)v, Sam 
Lee, John T. Ill 
Leonard, Barnard 
Levesque, Edward 



1940 liAinBOW 



C L A S S:^^ 




Lever, Aubrey 
Lewis, R03' C. 
Lord, Edward 
Lotz, W. J. 
Lloyd, Fred 
Luke, Gettis 
Luke, Ivan 
Mallett, Allen 
Alanly, Walter 
Mann. Carl J. 
Mason, G. L. 
Mathewson, Tracy 
Alays, Fred \Y. 
Maxwell, Tlios. 
Menger, Earl 1 
Miller, Norman 
Minor, John 
Mitchell, Bob 
Moblev, Clarence 
MobleV, H. J. 
Mock, Cleon 
Moore, James E. 
Moredock, J. W. 
Morgan, L. 
Morgan, Thomas 
Morris, Lawrence 
Mosley, Robert 
Moss, John M. 
Llorris, Carl 
Morris, C. W. 
Muns, Lewis 
Murphy, George 
Murphy, Henry 
Murray, Otis 
McAbeo, William 
McCall, George 
McDonald, James F. 
McElveen, Malcolm 
McFeely, Alyon 
McGahee, Roj' 
McGee, Raymond 



McGraw, Richard 
Mcllhaney, Robt. 
McKie, Wm. T. 
McMichael, Leroy 
Newman, Alfred ■■ 
Newman, George 
Nevin, John 
O'Hara, Jack 
Overstreet, George 
Owens, B. W. 
Palmer, Lawton 
Parrish, Robert 
Patterson, Forrest 
Patterson, H. N. 
Payne, James C. 
Peacock, Walter 
Pearre, Jerome 
Pearson, Morris 
Pearson, Sam 
Peebles, C. C. 
Pendleton, Chas. 
Pen field, Lloyd 
Pereyra, Eugene 
Peters. Billy 
Phillips, M. E. 
Plagwitz, Henry 
Powell, Jasper C. 
Pope, Fritz 
Pound, J. M. 
Powell, Ralph 
Poj'thress, L. T. 
Poole, Thomas 
Prescott, Harry 
Prescott, James 
Price, J. L. 
Fund, Wm. D. 
Rachels, Benny 
Rachels, J- M. 
Radford. J. T. 
Reiser, W. E. 
Reynolds, Walter 



Rhoden G. A. 
Rhoden. Eddie 
Rhoden, J. O. 
Jthodes, J. L. 
Rhodes, Frank 
Rhodes, James 
Rigsby, Mack 
Rinker, John 
Rizer, V. H. 
Roberts, W. O. 
Robinson, H. C. 
Roessler, W. F. 
Rollins, J. L. 
Rowe, Wm. A. 
Royall, C. C. 
Rucker, B. S. 
Rucker Julius T. 
Rucker, J. F. 
Russell, John 
Sanders, R. C. 
Sands, Stephens 
Sauls, James 
Saxon, W. G. 
Scarborough, O. 
Schuize, T. W. 
Scoggins, Joe 
Scott, F. L. 
Scott, T. B. 
Scott, W. S. 
Seago, C. 
Seago, John M. 
Seitz, Billy M. 
Sheip, Fred W. 
Shield, Thomas 
Sidener, Chas. W. 
Seigler, Wm. T. 
Sikes, Clarence 
Skinner, E. 
Skinner, Harold 
Slater, Garland 
Smith. David F. 



Smith, Edison M, 
Smith, Fernam G. 
Smith. Robt. V. 
Smith, W. H. 
Smoak, Marion 
Snooks, W. D. 
Speerman, W. G. 
Spradley, John 
Stanford, L F. 
Starnes, C. 
Steinberg, Aren 
Stewart, Ernest 
Stone, Harry F. 
Stone, John C. 
Story, A. 
Strauss, Lecn 
Strother, James F. 
Sturman, G. 
Swancy, J. H. 
Swint, Ernest 
Taylor, G. E. 
Taylor, Ra^'mond 
Tebow, John R. 
Temples, Albert 
Thomas, Gordan 
Thompson, Edward 
Thomljurg, C. 
Thurmond, Thomas 
Toole, Chas. E. 
Toole, Wm. F. 
Trapnell, Edgar 
Tudor, Arthur 
Tudor, Jim M. 
Turner, Robert 
Tuton, Charles 
Vignati, Joe 
Wages, James M. 
Walker, E. C . 
Ward, Julian 
Warren. L. A. 
Watkins, Ernest 



Waterston, Jack 
W'atson, J. O. 
Weathers, Milledge 
Weathersbee, F. C. 
Welch, H. C. 
Welch, Tyler 
Wells, Linsey W. 
Whaley, C. B. 
Wheatley, Charles 
Wheatley, Edward 
Wheathy, M. 
Wheeler, Frank 
Whitehead, Henry 
Widener, D. 
Widgeon, George 
Wilenski, Edwin 
Williams, Hugh 
Williams, Howard 
Win.go, Archie 
Wilson, W. H. 
Wong, Robert 
Wong, A. 
Wren, Artemus 
Wright, Donald 
Wright, E. H. 
Wright, Howard 
Wright, H. H. 
Wylds, Bert C. 
Wylds, V. S. 
Wylds, H. G. 
Yablon, Irving 
Yablon, Sanford 
Yarn, Wilbur 
Youngblood, Ralph 




Academy Awards and Winners 

GEORGE P. BUTLER MEMORIAL SCHOLARSHIP 
A scholarship amounting to $100.00 in cash to be paid as tuition for one year to the Junior College 
of Augusta, in memory of the late Dr. George P. Butler who served for many years as the efificient 
Principal of the Academy of Richmond County and who organized the Junior College of Augusta. 

Awarded in 1938 to ... . Carl Julien Simon 
Awarded in 1939 to . . Walter Allen Reiser, Jr. 

FACULTY WOMEN'S CLUB SCHOLARSHIP 
A scholarship for one year in the Junior College of Augusta, given by the Faculty Women's Club 
anioiunting tO' $100.00. This award is made on the basis of need, conduct, and scholarship. Scholarship 
85%, and Conduct 90%, or better. 

Awarded in 1939 to Cadet Edwin Barnett Pollock 

THE GEORGE TRAYLOR MEMORIAL MEDAL 
An endowed gold medal provided by Dr. and Mrs. George A. Traylor in honor of their son, George 
Traylor, to be awarded annually to that member of the Sophomore Class of The Academy of Richmond 
County, who is of outstanding character and who has made the highest academic record. 

Awarded in 1938 tn . . . . James Joseph Hill 
Awarded in 1939 to . . . Thomas Lander Hutto 

CUP AWARDED FOR BEST DECLAIMER 
This cup was given by the Senior Class of 1923 for the best declaimer of the school. The cup 
is to be held for one year and the name of the winner engraved on the cup. At the end of each year 
the cup is returned to the Principal to- be re-awarded. 

Awarded in 1938 to ... . Irvin Joel Daitch 
Awarded in 1939 to . Harcourt Edmund Waller 

D. A. R. PRIZE 
Each year the Augusta Chapter, Daughters of the American Revolution, offer a prize of five dollars 
to the cadet making the highest grade for the year in American History. 

Awarded in 1938 to . . Mose Collins Murphey 
Awarded in 1939 tO' . . . James Joseph Hill. Jr. 

SENIOR SCHOLARSHIP MEDAL 
Presented to the Academy Senior making the highest academic average during the fourth year. 
Awarded in 1938 to . . John Riley Fulmer, Jr. 
Awarded in 1939 to . . Walter Allen Reiser, Jr. 

SENIOR ACTIVITIES MEDAL 
Presented to the Senior voted the l^est-all-round Academy Senior. 

Awarded in 1938 to . . John Riley Fulmer, Jr. 
Awarded in 1939 to . . James Hairston Nowell 

SENIOR ATHLETIC MEDAL 
Presented to the Academy Senior voted the best Senior Athlete. 

Awarded in 1938 to . . William Hubert Goatley 
Awarded in 1939 to . . Harry Foxx Parrish, Jr. 

BAUSCH AND LOMB MEDAL FOR EXCELLENCE IN SCIENCE 

Presented to the Academy Senior making the highest average in the four years of Science. 

Awarded in 1938 to . . . John Riley Fulmer, Jr. 

Awarded in 1939 to . . . Louis LaGarde Battey 

FRIEDMAN CUP 
This cup given by the Friedman Jewelers tO' the most valualde plaver each year on the football 
team. This year two names will be engraved on this cup. 

Awarded in 1939 to . . Lineman Joe Rossbotham 
Awarded in 1939 to ... . Back Bill Kincer 

Awarded in 1940 to Eugene Avery 

Awarded in 1940 to Henry Caver 

THE COURTNEY TROPHY 
This is cup provided by a former student of The Academy of Richmond County, Mr. Cal Court- 
ney, to be engraved each year with the name of the outstanding senior athlete. Mr. Courtney is pro- 
viding a replica of this trophy to be given as a permanent keepsake to the winner each year. 

Awarded in 1939 to . . Harry Foxx Parrish, Jr. 



Significant Facts about Academy 

Compiled by C. G. Cordle 



July 31, 1783, Board of Trustees set up by the General Assembly of Georgia 
in session at Augusta. 

April 12, 1785, the Richmond County Academy opened in a building on Bay 
Street between the present Fourth and Third Streets. 

May 20, 1791, President Washington visited the Academy. 

End of 1798 the Academy closed because of impaired funds and dilapidated 
buildings. 

November 1, 1802, the Academy resumed operations in a new building on 
Telfair Street. 

July 1, 1816, a branch academy was opened by the Trustees on the Sand Hills. 

1830's, the Academy had more than four hundred students. 

1850, there was talk of raising the Academy to a college, to be named Tubman 
College. 

September 1, 1863, the Academy building was taken over by the Confederate 
government, and the grounds became the site of Georgia Hospital No. 3. 
The Academy was, of course, closed. 

May 2, 1865, sick and wounded soldiers were removed to the Asylum Hospital. 
In a few days the Academy building became military headquarters of 
the United States troops. 

Fall, 1867, the Academy building and grounds were restored to the Trustees. 

January 1, 1868, the Academy reopened with four professors, all Confederate 
veterans, with Colonel George W. Rains as regent. 

1882, a military department was organized under Captain J. O. Clarke as 
instructor. After a few years this department was abolished. 

1898, the military department was revived, and Major George P. Butler was 
made commandant 

1909, the Richmond County Board of Education, by agreement with the 
Trustees of Richmond Academy, assumed responsibility for the operation 
of the school. 

1925, The Junior College of Augusta was founded. 

1926, the Academy of Richmond County was removed to its new site on 
Baker Avenue. 

1926, unit of the Reserve Officers Training Corps was established by the 
United States government in the Academy and Junior College. 

Fall, 1938, new wing of the Academy building was opened to classes. 




Snappy 



SNAPS 



The ever-popular Mr. Cordle \\ith 
proverbial map. 



Mr. Derrick's chemistry laborator}- is one 
of assiduous activity 



George Dasher, the best-beloved of our teachers, 
gives valuable instructiini to his neophytes 



Mr. Allen must have checked the French on his 
board most carefully! 



I-Wjl ' . 






1 


r 






w 




[ 


Hl 




m ^m . 




^*^^iP 





^n 



* 







Sergeant Wilkerson, filing military 
information, and First Lieut. Donald 
Leverett, Officer of the Day, in the 
ofifice of Major Elliott. 




yniiila 



rij 



Milifary 

SPONSORS 



Each year the officers of the Mihtary 
Department choose a sponsor. These 
sponsors are honored at several mili- 
tary Imlls during the year. The sponsors 
are presented formal!}- at a lovely ban- 
quet given In' the Salire Club. After the 
banquet, the brilliant Sponsors' Ball is 
held. This is one of the outstanding 
formals of the year. .\n arch of sabres 
is formed; and, as each charming sjjon- 
sor, beautifull}- gowned, comes through 
on the arm of an officer, it is indeed 
a picturesque scene. 

At the Prize Drill, held each year, the 
sponsors attend in a body, to review 
the companies on parade. 




Annette Bates 
Margaret Sheftall 



Maxine Farr 
Katherine Sheffield 



Kathryn Best 
Dorothea Gridley 




Mary Hoffman 
Tula Hilty 



Manila Stclling 
.\gnes Wofford 



Annette Bates — one of "the liates Twins" — Charm- 
ing voice — Glee Club star. 

Alaxine Farr — a cheer — stylish clothes — a good time. 

Kathryn Best — a hook — a dance — and Bill. 

Margaret Sheftall — stately beauty — an annual in 
her hand — a mcrrx- laugh — a bridle path — orchids. 

Katherine Sheft'ield — soft-accented speech — a thrill- 
ing dre^s — an original st}le. 

Dorothea Gridley — a Yankee boy — a dash of gaiety — 
a new fashion ^traternit\' ]n'ns — understanding. 

Mary Hoft'man--Egyptian beauty — charm bracelet — 
a bonfire and niarshmallows. 

Martha Stalling — dog on a leash — lace and red 
roses — a multi-colored sash — a lilting laugh. 

Tula Hilty — a quick mi(\ement — lowered eyes — 
clicking heels — sweetness. 

Agnes Wofford — lovely hands— -blue xelvet — soft 
lights — a waltz — reverie. 




Elizabeth Bryans 
Katherine Kearns 



Clara Bracey 
Frances Hurt 



kita May 
Mickey Talbert 



Agnes Rees 
Jean Rae 



Dot Davenport 
Dot Douglas 



Elizabeth Bryans — beautiful brunette — seen at all 
the dances — jitterbug — bright colors accentuate 
her dark l)eauty — gorgeous brown eyes. 

Clare Bracey — quiet — Dresden loveliness — son mus- 
ic — an open fire. 

Rita May — petite — lovely smile — surrounded by- 
admirers — tinkling silver bells. 

Agnes Reese — gay laughter — twinkling eyes — white 
camellias — Spanish lace. 

Dot Davenport — athlete — new coiffure — vivacious — 
a flashing smile. 

Katherine Kearns — elfin mischievousness — gay chat- 
ter — carnivals — popcorn. 

Frances Hurt — brown eyes — red dress — a rhumba — 
gypsy music — gold spangles. 

^Mickey Talbert — starlight — cameo quuaintness — an 
unusual smile — cheerfulness. 



Jean Rae — blonde — cute smile — smart clothes — pale 
blue pearls. 

Dot Douglas — laughter — noise — school dances — 
Fashion Show — pepetual motion. 




"^ 1940 HAinBOW 



is 



The 

COLORS 



-.r=^. 




Ofi Parade! 




Major Walter A. Elliott, 
Infantry U. S. Army 

1917 Commissioned 2nd Lieutenant 
Infantry. 

1918 Commissioned temporary 1st 
Lieutenant Infantr\-. 

1919 Commissioned permanent 1st 
Lieutenant Infantry. 

1928 Commissioned Captain Infan- 
try. 

1937 Commissioned Major Infantry 
1924 Graduate of Company Officers' 
Course, The Signal School. 

1929 Graduate Company Officers' 
Course, The Infantry School. 

13th Division during World War. 

During 22 years in the army, serv- 
ice in the 44th Infantry, 5th Infantry, 
2nd Infantry and 57th Infantry. 

Instructor with the Iowa Xational 
Guard. 

Staff of Major Gen. Frank Bolles 
and of Brigadier Gen. Dana T. Mer- 
rill. 

Foreign service in France, Ger- 
many, and the Philippines. 

P. M. S. & T and Commandant 
at A. R. C. 1938. 

A Popular Commandant ! 



1^ 



Sergeant William C. McGee 

1917 Enlisted in the U. S. Army. 

1917 — Sergeant in U. S. Army. 
World War — Bayonet instructor. 

19-5 D.E.M.L. R.O.T.C. at Colum- 
Inis, Ga. 

1935 Staff' Sergeant at Richmond 
Academy. 

"Sergeant" has come to be the 
idol of the children, the "pal" of the 
students, and the "hail-fellow-well- 
met" comrade of the members of 
faculty. 





Jones Epps 
1939 Winner 



jack Hains 
1938 Winner 



The Richard B. Sheridan 
Memorial Sabre 



One of the most lieautifiil of the numerous awards 
made at the Acadeni}- and Junior College eacn year 
is that of the Richard B. Sheridan Memorial Sabre. 
Cadet Sheridan graduated from the Junior College 
in June 1928 and immediately went on to West 
Point. He lost his life in a football game at Yale 
in 1931. 

The Reserve Ofricers Association of Augusta con- 
ceived the idea of making an annual award of a 
beautiful sabre to perpetuate not only the memory 
but the outstanding character of Cadet Sheridan. 
The basis of this award is broad enough to cover the 
general qualities that distinguish Richard B. Sheri- 
dan among his fellow students. These considerations 
enter into the decision of a select committee from 
the Reserve Officers Association. The student must 
be of high scholastic achievement, outstanding as a 
military man, and interested in athletics and other 
student activities. In other words, he must be a 
well-rounded man. 

The winners of this award have been as follows : 

Frank Burnley . . ... 1933 

Jackie Stephens 1934 

iJorroh Nowell 1935 

Alex Doremus 1936 

Harry Mobley 1937 

Jack Hains 1938 

Jones Epps 1939 

The winner for the current year. 1940, had not 
vet been determined at the time this year book 
went tO' press. 




Accomplishments of the Freshman Battalion 




By Staff Sergeant Wm. C. McGee 



The Freshman Battah'on. although not a part 
of the R.O.T.C., functions independently in regard 
to the War Department's program of instruction. 
It plays a very important role in maintaining the 
strength of the R.O.T.C. 

Freshmen are taught the fundamental principles 
of Military Science and Tactics. Individual instruc- 
tion and close-order drill of the squad are intended 
especially for the training of the men in the ranks. 
Teamwork is promoted, and training is afforded for 
leaders, sc^uads, platoons, and guides. Preciseness 
is essential if the purpose of drill is to be achieved. 

Due to the drastic change in the Infantry Drill 
Regulations, much confusion was noticed for 
awhile. The Battalion responded very well ; and the 
difficulty, due to the intricate movements, is now 
a thing of the past. 

The cadet officers are selected from the Senior Class of the Academy and from Junior College; 
but the Xon-Commissioned Oft'icers are Freshmen. The officers are chosen for their merit, and they 
are the ones who have the responsibilty for carrying out our schedule. We stress leadership. To be 
respected as a leader, one must possess certain mental and moral qualifications. To have a good or- 
ganization, certain requirements must be adhered to; respect for superiors, a keen sense of responsi- 
bilit}-, and ability to give and to obey orders. The officers must set a good example for those under their 
command. 



The battalion has taken part in several parades, 
and it has made a creditable showing. The majority 
have a good keen sense of humor, and really try 
hard. They perform their duties on the drill field in 
a satisfactory manner. They change from raw re- 
cruits to well-trained cadets, able tO' march with 
heads u]3 and chins in — a credit to the unit. 

So our ideal for the future will be to have the 
outstanding unit in the Fourth Corps Area, and to 
uphold the grand and glorious prestige of the Army 
and of the Academy of Richmond County. To those 
two grand gentlemen, Mr. Hardy and Mr. Markert, 
a vote of thanks for their hearty cooperation in 
making it possible for us to- function one hundred 
per cent. 




Sergeant William C. .McC 




THE REGIMENTAL 



Xell Daniel 

Sponsor 



Irvin Daitch 
,icu tenant-Colonel 



•k 



Maxine Farr 
Sponsor 



• 




Our cadet-coloiiel is serving his second year as commander of the corps. Colonel Hains is also 
president of the Student Council, member of the champion Hearst Trophy Rifle Team, 1938-1939, and 
winner of the coveted Sheridan Sabre award. He was National Individual Champion in the Hearst 
Trophy Match in 1938. 




Albert Bruckner 
Captain 



iJurulhea Grulley 
Sponsor 



Kathc-rine Sheffield 
•Sponsor 



Ernest Wiggins 
Captain 



l! 



STAFF OFFICERS 



Our regimental staff officers were selected 
for their sterling worth in military conduct 
and leadership. Almost invariably, these offi- 
cers are also leaders in all other phases of 
school life. 




Kathryn Best 
Sponsor 




Bailey Daitch Epps Hains Wiggins Krewson Balk 



Luther Krewson 
1st Lieutenant 



Bill Balk 
2nd Lieutenant 



ir 

PLATOON 




Platoon drill constitutes one of the essential 
parts of the training- of the cadets. It is the 
training ground for our aspiring "non-coms", 
and a source of never-ending interests for our 
numerous spectators. 






William Mauldin 
Major 



Mary Hoffman 
Sponsor 



G. Felton Hill 

1st Lieutenant 



BAT 



fisit 



ALIGN 



^ 



STAFF 



Major Epps was succeeded by Major William 
Mauldin, who, in turn, was followed by Major Bill 
Bailey. The commander of the 1st Battalion has one 
of the select assignments of the military unit. 




xMajur Epps 



Major Elli(jtt 





COMPANY "A" 



V "t 



Annette Bates 
Sponsor 



^ 



^ 



Harcourt Waller 
1st Lieutenant 



Gene Aver^- 
2nd Lieutenant 



Roscoe Lowerv 
2ntt Lieutenant 




Captain Parks is an active member of the J.C.A. Hi-Y. The highly-prized Gold "R" speaks for 
his extra-curricula work. He is a inernber of the Sabre Club and the Basketball Team. 




ttnii 




COMPANY "B 



Charles Kimbrell 
1st Lieutenant 



Eugene Hoke 

2nd Lieutenant 



^ 



i^ 




Agnes Wofford 
Sponsor 



Frank Knapp, captain of Company "B", is a popular member of his class. We feel that his 
captaincy is well deserved. 











-L-!.^^B 




M^Kk-^^M 


^m 






m 




nliiiiihiidiili 


n 




COMPANY "C" 



June Swedenberg 
Sponsor 



^ 



^ 



Heyward Bateman 
1st Lieutenant 



Joe Murray 
1st Lieutenant 



James Phillips 

2nd Lieutenant 




The fact that Captain Britton earned his appointment while :-till in the Academy is sufficient 
Commendation. 




ttrNJi 



COMPANY "D 




Ed Shell 
1st Lieutenant 



Henry Farris 
2nd Lieutenant 



¥ 



i^ 




Tom Gwin 
Captain 



Ann Taylor 
Sponsor 



Captain Tom Gwin, who left us to matriculate at Clemson, has been succeeded by Captain 
Harcourt Waller. 




Major Hanson was high in 
praise of the unit after making 
this inspection. 



Scenes from one of the Sabre 
Club dances. The social activi- 
ties of the unit are varied and 
interesting. 




Mr. Felder on the job. 



Drum Major Stringer "struts' 
f(ir the Band. 




O'Neal Cave 
Major 



1 Martha Stelling- 
Sponsor 



George Suhr 
1st Lieutenant 




STAFF 



Major Cave, an excellent battalion commander, 
is a versatile member of the cadet corps. He has 
earned letters in several sports. His ability has 
proved a decided factor in the success of the 1940 
J.C.A. Basketball team. 




Lieutenant Suhr 



Major Cave 





P.ill Smith 
Captain 



COMPANY "E 



if 



Clare Bracey 

Sponsor 



^ 



^ 



\\'alter Reiser 
1st Lieutenant 



Jinimie Cooper 
2nd Lieutenant 



Xathan Gillman 
2nd Lieutenant 




Captain Bill Smith has shown marked ability as a leader in the school. His initiative and spirit 
have worked wonders with his company. His worth has not, fortunately, been limited to militarv. 
In other organizations, such as the Pre-Law Club, he has merited similar praise. 



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COMPANY "F" 



Howard Johnston 
1st Lieutenant 



John Sullivan 
2nd Lieutenant 



Frank Inman 
2nd Lieutenant 



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if 




Rita May 

Sponsor 



Company "F" is grateful to Captain Duncan for his efficient and sympathetic guidance. In 1939, 
he was the leader of the Best Drilled Platoon in R.O.T.C. 





COMPANY "G" 



^ 



yi- 



Agnes Reese 

Sponsor 



Bobby Baker 
1st Lieutenant 



Luke Rushton 
2nd Lieutenant 




An honor student, a leader in student activities, the captain of his company — John Roesel is, indeed, 
an asset to the battaHon. 





COMPANY "H" 



H. F. B. Koch 
1st Lieutenant 



Thomas Wong- 
1st Lieutenant 



Mac Rhodes 
2nd Lieutenant 



^ 



-k 




Bernard Alitchum 
Captain 



Dorothy Davenport 
Sponsor 



Company "H" is fortunate in having for commander this outstanding member of his class. 
Bernard is a veteran of several years on our championship rifle teams. He has been a company com- 
mander for two years, and his athletic record is quite envialjle. 





Alfred Battey 
Major 



Elizabeth Bryans 

Sponsor 



Lawrence Buckley 
1st Lieutenant 




BAT 




ALION 



STAFF 



Major Alfred Battey is also the 
president of his class. His award this 
year of being the most popular Sopho- 
more eliminates the need of listing his 
long and impressive record of achieve- 
ments. 




Alajur Battey taking charge. 





Philip Carroll 
Captain 



COMPANY 



Ml> 



Katherine Kearns 
Sponsor 



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John Bracey 
1st Lieutenant 



Euley Weathers 
2nd Lieutenant 



1 




The marked improvement in Company "I" has been brought about larg-cl\- through the untiring 
efforts of its popular captain. Philip Carroll. 




% 




COMPANY 



Fred Anderson 
2ik1 Lieutenant 



Spann Greene 
2nd Lieutenant 



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iK 




Fannie Hurt 
Sponsor 



Note : — Captain Dick Baird is now in charge of Company "K", his predecessor, 
Harold Xorvell. having: left us to attend Clemson. 





Reginald Hancock 
Captain 



\ 



COMPANY 'V 



\ 



j^ 



T^ 



Dick Baird 

Isl Lieutenant 



Julian Willing-ham 

2nd Lieutenant 



Oshorne Stelliiig 
2nd Lieutenant 



Miriam Talbert 
Sponsor 




Reginald Hancock, Captain of Company "L" and "right-hand man" of Dean 
Markert, is well liked by the members of his company. We predict further 
success for hiin. 





COMPANY "M" 



Harry Carpenter 
1st Lieutenant 



Harry Popkin 
1st Lieutenant 



George McLendon 
2nd Lieutenant 



^ 



-1^ 




C. 13. Thurmond 
Captain 



Jean Rae 
Sponsor 



The winner of the 1938 Individual Drill Prize has continued his excellent work in military as the 
commander of his company. His sparkling performance in this branch of student life is matched by 
his accomplishments in the others. He is the winner of the 1940 Stunt Night. 




Sabre 



CLUB 




1st Row 


Mitcliuni, B. 


Lowory. R. 


Johnston. H. 


Cave. O. 


Epps, J. 


Koch, B. 


Karris. H. T. 


Baird. R. 


Kimbrell, C. 


Bailey, W. 


Shell, E. 


Smith, W. 


Stelliiig. O. 


Hoke. G. 


Battey, A. 


Roesel, J. 


Phillips, W. 


Hill, G. F. 


Waller. H. 


Elliott. Maj. W. 


A. Siihr, G. 


Bracey, J. 


Hancock, R. 


Parks, G. H. 


Hains. J. 


Brown. W. T. 


Murray, J. 


Carroll, P. 


Stringer, F, 


Daitch. I. 






Weathers. E. 


Brandenberg, M 


Maiilrlin. \V. 


3rd Row 


4th Row 


Anderson, F. 


Barnard, D. 




Bruckner, A. 


Reiser, W. 




Wilkerson, R. 


2nd Row 


Britton, W. 


Thurmond, C. B. 


5th Row 


Popkin, H. 


Gwin, T. 


Cooper. J. 


Key, L. 


Krevvson, L. 


Willingham, J. 


Norvell, H. 


Bateman, H. 


Inman, F. 


Duncan, J. B. 


Rhodes, M. 


Wiggins, E. 


Wong. T. 


Buckley, J. L. 


Baker, B. 


Leverett, D. 



An organization which has l)een in existence in the Academy since Ijefore an\- of us can renieni1:ier is the 
Sabre Club. This organization has a history which no other group in the school can match, and its traditions are so 
firmly entrenched in the school life that they will exist for }-ears and years. The club was organized way back 
when the Acadeni}- instituted military training, and it has grown in size from about ten members to more than sixty. 

The purpose of the club is the provision of entertainment or recreation, social or otherwise, for the members 
of the club and any form of betterment of the military dejiartment of the Junior College of Augusta and the .Aca- 
demy of Richmond County. Membershi]! in the Sabre Club is restricted to the commissioned officers of the corps of 
cadets, and all these officers are required by army tradiion to join the club. 

At the beginning of the first semester last fall, the members of the club elected officers for the _\ear. Col. Jack 
Hains was elected ])resident, Maj. Battey. vice-president. Lieut. Harcourt Waller, secretary, and Maj. O'Neal Cave, 
treasurer. During the first semester two dances were presented under the direction of the club dance committee. 
The darice committee was composed of Col. Irvin Daitch. Ca])t. Albert Piruckner. Lieut, Tom Cwin. and Ca])t. 
Ernest Wiggins. 

Shortly after the Christmas holidays were oxer, the members decided that the club was too large to be gov- 
erned by unwritten law and tradition, and a committee was appointed to draw uj) a constitution. This committee 



was composed of Lieut. Harry Popkin, Lieut. Roscoe Lowery, Maj. Alfred Battey, Maj. W. T. Brown, and Capt. 
John Roesel. The committee drew up a very laudable document, which, after several corrections and adjustments, 
was unanimously accepted by the members. 

The constitution provides for four administrative officers (president, vice-president, secretary, and treasurer), 
to be elected at the beginning of each semester of the school year. Under the constitution the meetings are held on 
the second and fourth Tuesday of each calendar month, at the beginning of the seventh clock period of the school. 
All members must attend the meetings, and any member who is absent without excuse from twO' meetings in one 
semester is subject to expulsion from the club. All the meetings must be conducted according to paliamentary pro- 
cedure, and Robert's Rules of Order will be the final authority on all questions of parliamentary law not covered 
by the constitution or the by-laws. 

Under the constitution the committees set up were Advisory, Appeals, Finance, and Entertainment. The presi- 
dent appoints a chairman for the Finance and Entertainment Committees ; then he and the chairman together 
appoint the remaining committee members. The duties of these two committees are explained by their titles. The 
Appeals Committee consists of three members ; one is appointed by the president, one by the Advisory Committee, 
and the other is elected by popular vote. The Appeals Committee acts as a sort of "Supreme Court" for the club, 
and its decisions are superior to any except those of the Advisory Committee. The Advisory Committee is composed 
of the commandant of the cadet corps and any other person he may appoint to act with him ; its duties are to 
advise the club in all matters. 

Under the new regulations the following officers were elected for the second semester: Col. Jack Hains, 
president; Maj. O'Xeal Cave, vice-president; Lieut. Harry Popkin, secretary; Maj. Jones Epps, treasurer; and 
Lieut. Charles Askey, sergeant-at-arms. Capt. Bill Smith was elected by the members to serve on the Appeals 
Committee. Also on the Appeals Committee are Maj. Alfred Battey, appointed by President Hains, and Col. Irvin 
Daitch, appointed by the Advisory Committee. Col. Daitch was also appointed by the president to act as chairman 
of the Entertainment Committee. 

Under this new "regime" the Sabre Club is looking forward to greater accomplishments than ever before. The 
Sabre Club dance on March 29, the first entertainment presented by the new committee, proved to be one of the 
most successful social functions of the year; and the members of the club and the entire school are looking forward 
with great interest to the Annual Sabre Club Banquet and the Sponsors' Ball. These will be held shortly before 
the end of school, and the Entertainment Committee declares that this year these two events will be the most gala 
affairs ever presented by the club. And that's saying a mightj^ lot; for the Sabre Club is noted for its wonderful 
social events. 

The club has indeed had a busy year. There was never a dull moment in the life of the organization, and the 
officers feel that the club accomplished its purpose in the fullest sense of the word. Always a center of activity, 
this tradition-laden organization held its reputation of being in the front ranks among student organizations, and 
we feel sure that 50 or 60 years from now, the Sabre Club will still have an important part in the life of our school. 




Jack Hains, President of Clul) 




THE 





Donald Leverett 
1st Lieutenant 



Marshall Brandenhur! 
1st Lieutenant 



Robert Wilkinson 
Jnd Lieutenant 





The Greater Richmond Academy Band 

The Academy Band has ]:)een one of the most important organizations on the Campus for many 
years. The late D. M. Lincul, who brought it to a high state of proficiency, had been its director on a 
part time basis since the acceptance of the Cadet Corps as a Junior R.O.T.C. unit by the War Depart- 
ment in 1925. As a musician and director, Mr. Lincul was devoted to his work and untiring in his efforts 
to develop an outstanding musical organization. 

\\'hen our new president, Mr. Eric W. Hardy, took over the administration of the schools in 1938, 
he at once announced his purpose to build a great band of one hundred pieces, which should be properly 
uniformed and ecjuipped. As a result of efforts among alumni and friends, and particularly the sponsor- 
ship of the Junior Chamber of Commerce, by the spring of 1939 nearly two thousand dollars had been 
raised for the purchase of uniforms. The band got into their snappy uniforms before the close of that 
session, and upon their first public appearances captured the interest and enthusiasm of the people of 
the community. 

The ne.xt step was to procure a full-time Director and Music Instructor. Mr. Grover W. Carson 
was brought to the Academy after successful experience in Illinois, Kentucky, and Missouri. Mr. Carson 
is devoting his talents and energies not only to directing the present Band, Ijut to training the younger 
students in the use of wind instruments in preparation for their absorption into the greater band of 
the future. We are building slowly, but sanely, toward the "Greater Richmond Academy Band", and 
the complete realization of the dream of our President that we should some day have the greatest school 
band in the South. We are definitely on the way. 



BAND ROSTER 



CAPTAIN 
Barnard, D. 

1ST LIEUTENANTS 
Stringer, F. 
Brandenburg, W. M. 

2ND LIEUTENANTS 
Wilkinson, R. 
Stevens, D. 

1ST SERGEANT 
Calamas, D. 

STAFF SERGEANT 
Kenned}', J. 



SERGEANTS 
Cole, A. 
Daniels, A. 
Dunaway, W. 
Luke, J. 
Purkall, B. 
Tyner, G. 

CORPORALS 
Belding, J. 
Bell, B. 
Brake, B. 
Girardot, W. 
Tudor, A. 
Turner, W. 



PRIVATES 
Aldridge, J. 
Balkman, W. 
Beckworth, C. 
Bedingfield, H. 
Black, H. 
Chalmers, J. 
Cummings, J. 
Doolittle,, A. 
Hull, D. 
Harveston, F. 
Hummell, M. 



Lassiter, W. 
Lamar, H. 
Leonard, H. 
Lewis, C. 
McMichael, L. 
Palmer, A. 
Sanders, R. 
Stelling, K. 
Stringer, J. 
Tudor, Allen 
Tyner, R. 
Ward, C. 



SERGEANT 
Carry, R. 

PRIVATES 
Best, H. 



Freshman Band and Bugle Corps 



Florie, J. 
Jones, A. 
Ward, J. 
Wingo, C. 
G. W. Carson, Director 



Mass, H. 
Payne, J. 
McElveen, M . 



Douglas Barnard 
Captain 



Dot Douglas 

Sponsor 



Forrest Stringer 
Drum Major 



Tula Hilty 
Sponsor 





v- 



MARKSMEN 



1940 Team 

In 4th Corps Area Match 

Seals, M. 94.00 

Elrod, H. 91.97 

Barrett. J. 91.50 

Weatherwax, F 91.50 

Browne. L. D. - -91.00 

Baker. T. -90.75 

Balk. W. A. ..-_.. -90.30 

Mitchum. B. 87.00 

Smith, C. 86.50 

Mains. T. --84.75 

Sneed, W. 83.50 

Caldwell, J 81.00 

Bumiughs, J. 79.75 

Lowerv, R, 78.25 




Jack Hains getting "pointers" from Sergeant Wilkerson 



TROPHIES 

Hearst Trophy (National Champions) 1938-39 

Fourth Corps Area Trophy 2nd Place, 1935 

Fourth Corps Area Trophy, 1st Place, 1936, 
1937, 1938, 1939. 



1938 Hearst Trophy National 
Championship Team 

1. John T. Hains, National 
Individual Champion 

2. Tee Balk 

3. Abner Covar. 

4. William Jakes, Jr. 

5. John R. Fulmer, Jr. 

1939 Hearst Trophy National 
Championship Team 

1. Tom Baker, 2nd in Nat- 
ional Individual Scoring. 

2. Ed Schuler 

3. Carl Edelblut 

4. John T. Hains 

5. Tee Balk 



Pictures Below : 

Hugh Elrod Standing position 

Hugh Elrod — Sitting position 

Bill Balk _ Sitting position 










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COACHES 



Coach Wendell Sullivan arrived at the Academy 
in September, 1937. from Decatur High School, 
where he was instructor and coach. The first year 
here he was backfield coach, and the following year 
he was appointed head coach. At once he began 
to show definite results in the building of a great 
football team. The success of Coach "Sully" is due 
nth to the fact that he knows the game and also to the fact that he is every inch a gentleman in his 

relations to his assistants and players. The boys love to work for him, simply because they love him. 

With our enlarged football program under the direction of Coach Royston, by which we are trying 

to give elementary instruction on the fundamentals of the various athletic games to the grade school 

students. Coach Sullivan hopes to build greater teams in the future. 



THE FRIEDMAN TROPHY 

Coaches Sullivan and Rollins congratu- 
late Caver and Avery, the winners of 
the prized Friedman Trophy, presented 
each year by Friedmans Jewelers to 
the football back and linesman showing 
the most sportsmanlike spirit. 

WINNERS 

1938-39 Back— Bill Kincer, 

Linesman — Joe Rossbotham 

1939-40 Back— Hank Caver. 

Linesman — Gene Avery 




Coach G. L. Bolton 

"B" Varsity Football 
Track 



and LEADERS 



Scene below from the Rick Hill ban- 
quet, given annually to the coaches 
and members of the "A" Varsity foot- 
ball team. Rick Hill is a former A.R.C. 
student and one of the most ardent 
followers of Academy athletics. 



Coach R. E. Rollins 

Football 

J.C.A. Basketball 

Track 




Coach G. W. Ewing 

"B" Varsity Football 

Minor Sports 



C. M. Etheredge 
Athletic Director 



Coach C. A. Royston 

J.C.A. Girls' Basketball 

Intramural Sports 





FOOT 



Joe Murray snags a pass 




Louis Ross 



Ends 


Tackles 


Guards 




Ce 


titers 


Backs 


Strother, Clinton 


Ross, Louis 


Culpepper, Jack 


■A^ 


ery. 


Eugene 


Mitchum. Bernard 


Willis. Howard 


Plunkett. Paul 


Sanders, John 


Gordon 


,01in 


Young, Bill 


Marsh, Ed. 


Mauldin, Bill 


Bryant, Ed. 








Caver, Henry 


Wilson, Carl 


Rankin, George 


Rogers, Roy 








Cole, Edward 


Timmerman, Tom 


Lamar, Barney 


Hudson. Marion 








Murray, Joe 


Seals. Marvin 


Landrum, Joe 










Johnson. Wellsman 
Sexton. Clyde 
Stark.Bob 




BALL 




Clinton Strother 



The Boys in Huddle 
Mauldin, No. 33, seems 
to be asleep ; but don't be 
misled. He has come out 
of huddles always awake 
enough to be a power on 
the team. 




SCORES 



Richmond Academy 


33 


Bolles School 


Richmond Academy 


18 


Commercial High 7 


Richmond Academy 





Savannah High 


Richmond Academy 


13 


Benedictine 7 


Richmond Academy 


6 


Tech High 27 


Richmond Academy 


6 


Marist School 


Richmond Academy 


6 


Monroe Aggies 7 


Richmond Academy 


27 


Carlisle 


Richmond Academy 


6 


Lanier High 7 



H 



(Left to Right) 

Hank Caver 
Bernard Mitchum 
Gene Avery 
Wellsman Johnson 
Bubber Cole 






Carl WMlson, End 



W'ellsnian Johnson 
Fullback 



Joe Murray 
Fullback 



John Sanders 
Guard 




Louis Ross 
Tackle 



Bo):) Stark, Back 



Geortje Rankin, Tackle 



Resume OF "A 



77 



The Academy opened the season on September 
29 with Bolles Hig-h School of Jacksonville, Florida. 
The cadets started to work on the Bolles eleven at 
the opening whistle and continued to run roughshod 
over them until the final gun. Henry Caver grabbed 
the limelight with his exceptional ball toting, ac- 
counting for eighteen of the Academy's thirty-three 
points. Johnson and Sanders cleared the path for 
Caver's long runs with their excellent blocking. 
The team's splendid playing proved that the Acad- 
emy hadn't graduated all its good football players. 
Score : Richmond 33 — Bolles 0, 

The next game was with the Commercial High 
from Atlanta on October 6. The Musketeers showed 
that it hadn't been all luck with Bolles. They dis- 
played both power and speed in downing a favored 
Commercial High team. Although outweighed, the 
scra]ipy Richmond team, led by Caver, gathered 
three touchdowns to their credit. jStrother was the 
sjiotlight-grabber with his fine blocking, tackling, and 
pass-snagging. Sullivan was indeed proud of his 
fighting eleven. Score: Richmond 18 — Commercial 7. 

The cadet ele\en invaded Savannah for an en- 
counter with the Geechees the following Saturday, 




Bernard ^litclunn, (Juarterback 




"Chink" Hardv, Back 



Olin Gordon, Center 



Roy Rogers, Guard 



VARSITY SCHEDULE 



October 13. Tough luck and hot weather proved too 
much for the Musketeers. Sad and disappointed, they 
returned home with a scoreless tie on their record 
book. Richmond made the only threat when they 
backed the hard-pressed Savannahians up to their 
own 4-yard line. There a fumble prevented a score. 
At this game we recognized Sanders as the fine 
tackier that he really is. 

After a week's layoff the rejuvenated Academy 
lads met the Fighting Irish from Savannah on 
October 27. To the joy of Coach Sullivan and the 
entire student body the record book showed a win 
for the Musketeers. It was a hard-fought game from 
beginning to end. Avery was too much for his heavier 
opponents; while Johnson, Caver, and Cole were too 
fleet to be stopped before gain was made. This game 
proved that the Musketeers were still in the running 
for the G.I.A.A. title. Score: Richmond 13 — Bene- 
dictine 7. 

November 3, at Atlanta Richmond 6 — 

Tech High 27 Oh well, we all have an of? day. 

From "Atlanta way" on November 10 came 
Marist College to engage an underdog A.R.C. team. 
Mitchum's brilliant cjuarterbacking and Murray's 



Barney Lamar 
Tackle 




IJd. Bryant 
Guard 




Howard Willis 
End 



Jack Culpepper 
Guard 



Cav( 



Murray 



Cole 



Johnson 





Captain "Biibber" Cole. Back 



"Gene" Avery, Center 



"Hank" Caver, Back 



Resume of "A" varsity schedule 

hard running sparked the team to one of the best performances of the year. Strother, WilHs, Ross, and 
Sanders were the defensive aces that kept the Irish lads back on their heels. Score : Richmond 6 — 
Marist 0. 

The highly-rated Aggies came to the Cadet stadium on the night of November 17, only to be 
outplayed. The Musketeers showed themselves to be superior in every phase of the game, but lacked 
the necessary punch in the third quarter when the ball was on Monroe's two-yard line. Missing their 
chances, the Cadets lost to Monroe and were toppled from the running in the G.I. A. A. "Rubber" Cole 
took the limelight with his "spot" passing and splendid running. It is interesting tO' note that this was 
the first game that the Academy team had lost in their stadium in 2 years. Score: A.R.C. 6 — Monroe 7. 

Carlisle came to Augusta on November 23 to get revenge for the lashing the cadets gave them the 
year before. The Musketeers were too much for the Bamberg eleven. After five cadet plays, blood was 
drawn. From that time on, the Sullivan eleven dominated the Turkey Day game. Sully loosened up 
and gave some of the bench boys their chance. A combination of the second and third teams continued 
the march, crossing pay dirt territory for the second time in the first quarter, and once each in the 
second and fourth. Score : Richmond 27 — Carlisle 0. 

To end the season an inspired Lanier High team came to Augusta to administer to the cadets a 
very bitter defeat. The one point margin which defeated the Academy was the only point after touch- 
down scored by the Lanier team during their season. Score : Richmond 6 — Lanier 7. 



Complete "A" Varsity Squad 




"B" VARSITY 

Football 



SCORES 



Warrenton 19 "B" Varsity 

(A Moral Victory) 



Thomson 

Graniteville 
North AuiTusta 6 



"B" Varsity 13 
"B" Varsity 20 
"B" Varsity 




Coach Ewing Coach Bolton 

Julian Gwin, Captain Whatley Scott, Mgr. 







1st 


Row 






2nd Row 


Sikes 






Inglett, Robt. 


Cox 




Sanders 


Algood 






White 


Wilson 




Gwin 


Gulledge 






Inglett, Richard 


Witt 




Johnson 


Adams 






Manly 


Crouch 




Carter 


Parker 






Wheatley 


Hudson, 


M 


Carter 


Barton, 


Ed 




Bradford 


Davidson 


Rice 


Miles 








Deas 




Miller 





3rd Row 




Scott 




Foster 


Fouche 




Mahoney 


McCarty 
Prescott 
Lovett 




Wilson 

Strayhorn 

Avrett 


Andrews 




Peters 


McCaslin 








Ik 1940 MIPBOW 



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A. R. a 

BASKETBALL 

"A" Varsity 

The 1939-40 basketball season 
opened December 14, 1939, against 
Warrenton with a victory for the 
Academy. Enthusiastic fans saw re- 
turning to the court four lettermen : 
Center, Clinton Strother; Forwards, 
Ben Popkin and Frank Inman ; and 
Guard, John Burroughs. These boys 
had bowed out of the G.I.A.A. finals 
of the previous year only after giv- 
ing the strong Lanier Poets of Macon 
a severe test. 

The big problem for Sullivan 
and the handicap for the players was 
the lack of height. Clinton Strother. 
center, and actually the only tall 
member of the cadet team, had only 

Howard Willis to assist him on the "''^I^^B%>i^iifci^^^^^^BP'^' ' 

snatch of loose balls off the back- 
board. In other qualifications, the 
boys of this year's team could have 
held their own on any court. Inman 

and Popkin, for exam])le, were unquestionably the best combination of forwards produced at the school in 
recent years. "Chink" Hardy, small in stature, was "large" in playing ability. This year Sullivan developed the 
best set of reserves in many years ; indeed, the second string was really a substitute string, their combination 
usually proving as effective as the first. The second string was composed of Burroughs, Atkinson, Culpepper, Wil- 
son, and Plunkett. 

In G.I.A.A. games pla)red the Academy won three and lost four; however, they were highly successful in 
defeating such teams as S. C. Freshmen, Bishop England, and Junior College. 























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1939-40 TEAM 


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Frank Inman 






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Jack Cr.lpepper 






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John Burroughs 


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Ben Popkin 




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"Chink" Hardy 






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Jack Atkinson 






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Clinton Strother 






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Paul Plunkett 






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Carl Wilson 


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Howard Willis 


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Resume of the Schedule 



Ben Popkin 



"Chink" Hardy 



Clinton Strother 











Plunkett makes one 




OPPONENTS 




A. R. C 


OPPONENTS 




A. R. 


Warrenton 


15 


41 


Benedictine 


32 


28 


Warrenton 


15 


63 


Tignall 


35 


ZZ 


Wrens 


18 


42 


Benedictine 


32 


31 


Carlisle 


15 


55 


Savannah 


40 


22 


Monroe 


28 


23 


Tignall 


23 


45 


Bishop England 


27 


41 


Ellenton 


30 


52 


Commercial 


36 


44 


Bishop England 


23 


56 


Savannah 


34 


41 


S. C. Freshmen 


40 


43 


Ellenton 


21 


44 


Monroe 


41 


33 


Carlisle 


26 


52 


J. C. A. 


27 


35 



Coach Sullivan has made a new kind of basketball 
history for the A.R.C. His teams have been very 
successful through the years, and the 1939-40 team 
was certainly no exception. The boys really co- 
operate with Coach "Sully." The team work and 
fine play of the members of the team reflect the 
finest type of coaching. 



Frank Inman 



Howard Willis 



'% 1940 ftAinBOW 




Bennie Bolgla and Harcourt Waller jumping center 



1939-40 SCHEDULE 



OPPONENTS 




J.C.A 


Hav-a-Tampa 


18 


47 


Sporters 


24 


35 


Ellenton 


19 


63 


Friedmans 


30 


19 


S. C. Freshmen 


21 


16 


B rewton-Parker 


28 


31 


Hav-a-Tampa 


32 


30 


G. M. C. 


54 


45 


Gordon 


35 


31 


Sporters 


31 


28 


Wrens 


17 


45 


Friedmans 


28 


26 


Brewton-Parker 


44 


45 


G. M. C. 


34 


39 


Hav-a-Tampa 


21 


34 


Sporters 


30 


26 


Ga. Freshmen 


36 


17 


Friedmans 


30 


32 


Ellenton 


25 


24 


Hav-a-Tampa 


35 


44 


Newberrv 


33 


50 


A. R. C.' 


35 


27 


Armstrong 


41 


24 



J. C. A. BOYS 



Much credit for the success of the 1940 
team should be given to Coach Rollins. He 
took an inexperienced team and developed 
it into a well-organized and hard-playing 
aggregation. Although many of the boys 
had never played basketball before this 
season, the team excelled in spirit, team 
work, and sportsmanship. What they lack- 
ed in experience, they made up by their 
hard work and diligent practice. The team 
was built around the three most seasoned 
players : Popkin, Cave, and Askey. A new 
star wh(^ became the spark of all plays 
was Jack Bishop, a forward. Popkin and 
Cave were excellent as guards, using their 
talents to the best efifect. Charles Askey 
and Harcourt- Waller were the pivot men 
for many well-developed and well-perpe- 
trated offensive pla}-s that were found use- 
ful many times. Whenever the need for 
substitution arose. Cooper, Krouse, Bolgla, 
Parks, and Kimbrell were present to step 
into the shoes of the regulars. 

Although the team lacked experience 
and therefore failed to repeat the banner 
successes of last year, the season was by 
all means a good one. The team entered 
with the faster and stronger teams in the 
City League and Gold Medal Tournament 
and made a creditable showing in bolh. 

for the season paired 
of the strongest college 



Their schedule 
them with some 
teams in this section. The inspired Junior 



Popkin and Askey guard Cave 



Totals 



731 



704 





Basketball 



College boys played their best 
games against these teams, licking 
G.M.A.. always a strong team, 
to- the tune of 39-34, and Brewton- 
Parker by 45-44. Good passing and 
hard play gave our boys a win over 
Gordon ^Military College. In the 
game with Newberr3^ the J-C.A. 
quintet got the jump on the South 
Carolinians and smothered them. 

The Rollins five dropped from 
the lead early in the City League, 
but their fighting spirit and their 
never-say-die determination kept 
them in the running until the end. 
Although not victorious, our boys 
will be remembered by their op- 
ponents and by witnesses of the 
games for their splendid team 
work and sportsmanship. 

In the Gold Medal Tournament 
the college lads failed to reach their 
usual stride and were eliminated 
early. 

When J.C.A. ventured to Doug- 
las for the opening round of the 
Junior College tournament, they 
were handicapped by a long trip 
and by the fact that their first 
game was with one of the strong- 
est of the college teams. This prov- 
ed too much for them, and they 
were eliminated in the first round. 




1939-40 TEAM 



Kneeling 
Bennie Bolgla 
O'Neal Cave 
Jimmie Cooper 
Holstein Parks 
Charles Kimbrell 



Standing 
Roj^^Krouse 
Charles Askey 
Harcourt Waller 
Harry Waller 
Jack Bishop 





Schedule 



OPPONENTS 




J.C.A 


Warrenton 


15 


26 


Warrenton 


21 


36 


Wrens 


15 


20 


Shmerling 


45 


35 


Savannah 


36 


45 


Thomson 


14 


48 


Ellenton 


27 


42 


C. Y, O. 


10 


32 


Dixie Pig 


14 


38 


Newberry 


28 


27 


Friedmans 


24 


32 


Savannah 


33 


22 


Charleston 


29 


24 


Shmerling 


38 


28 


Ellenton 


17 


42 


Newberry 


30 


40 


C. Y. O. 


14 


31 


Dixie Pig 


17 


54 


Charleston 


22 


23 


Teachers 


16 


16 


Shmerling 


34 


37 



Qirls BASKETBALL 



The Junior College Girls' Basketball Team of this 
year has retained the reputation for success and per- 
formance that has been maintained throughout the years. 
As a defensive team, they have shown unusual ability; 
their opponents have had to work extremely hard for 
every point scored. As an offensive team, their outstand- 
ing virtue has been in tl.eir clever handling of the ball. 

The spark plug for the 1940 team was the tricky and 
sharpshooting Dot Fulcher, who averaged better than 
twenty-five points per game. Her sense of timing and 
sportsmanlike team play were a source of wonder to her 
fans and admirers. 






1939-40 TEAM 



Virginia Whitt 
Mary Emma Pierce 
Dorothy Marsh 
Mary Stulb 



Kneeling 

Dorothy Fulcher 



Mildred Milligan 
Frances Dunbar 
Doris Kessler 



Standing 



Mabel Murray 
Hazel Allen 
Betty Marriott 
Bonnie Newberry 



Dorothy Timm 
Doris Robins 
Virginia Carpenter 
Clair Marriott 




The girls of the 1940 basketball team 
are gratefully appreciative for the loyal 
and sympathic help and instruction of 
Coach Charlie Royson. His teams, all 
through the }^ears, have been wonder- 
fully successful. His reputation as a 
referee is just as fine as that of his 
coaching. Among many other tourna- 
ments this year, he was selected to 
referee the G.I.A.A. 



'Ik 1940 HAinBOW 



Kneeling— Robert Parrish, 
Dewayne Guren, Mell 
Aycock. Billy Fleming. 
Robert Ivey, and Billy 
Chandler. 

Standing— Coach Rollins. 
Moody Wilson. Carl 
Sanders, Adam An- 
drews, Arthur Gibson, 
and Albert Atkinson. 




ARC "B" BASKETBALL 




1939-40 SCHEDULE 



"B" Varsity Albert Atkinson receives instruction 
from his "A" Varsity brother 



A.R.C. Freshmen 


11 


"B" 


Varsity 


33 


Y Intermediates 


24 


"B" 


Varsity 


22 


A. Z. A. 


21 


"B" 


Varsity 


15 


Thomson 


26 


"B" 


Varsity 


16 


Y Juniors 


16 


"B" 


Varsity 


28 


Aiken 


23 


"B" 


Varsity 


24 


Graniteville 


13 


"B' 


Varsity 


36 


Y Ramblers 


19 


"B" 


Varsity 


34 


Thomson 


22 


"B" 


Varsity 


27 


A.R.C. Freshmen 


11 


"B" 


Varsity 


66 


Aiken 


29 


"B" 


\^arsity 


22 


A. Z. A. 


17 


"B" 


Varsity 


36 


Graniteville 


24 


"B" 


\'arsity 


29 


Y Intermediates 


38 


"B" 


Varsity 


33 


Y Juniors 


12 


"B" 


Varsity 


51 


Y Ramblers 


13 


"B" 


Varsity 


36 



^ 




Cheerleaders! 



Front Row, Left to Right — Maxine Farr. Monroe Bowyer, Georgia Paquette. 
Back Row, Left to Right — Tom Gwin, Ernest Wiggins, Julian Baldowski. 



Leading the students in cheers 
at the football games this year 
are these students. Their lead- 
ership does much tOAvard build- 
ing up school spirit and in 
cheering our football team on 
to victorjr. Mascot for the cheer 
leaders is Monroe Bowyer, who 
reall}- does his part in leading 
cheers. Ernest Wiggins is head 
cheer leader and he has helped 
compose many pep songs and 
cheers. 




T 





Coach Langston Bolton 
Head Track Coach since 1930 




R 



A 



1940 TRACK TEAM 



Arrington, H. 
Atkinson, A. 
Atkinson. J. 
Avery, E. 
Barnes, A. 
Barnes, G. 
Bateman, H. 
Brittingham, T. 
Burroughs, J. 
Camp, H. 
Carter, J- 
Caver. H. 
Chance, J. 
Chaney. Ralph 
Chaney. Rudolph 
Collier. B. 
Cooper. B. 
Cumming. J. 

Graves, D. 

( luniniel, Al. 



Hutto, T. 
Inman, F. 
Jennings, D. 
Krewson, L. 
Lang. J. 
Lewis. G. 
Marriott. T. 
Marsh, E. 
Norvell. B. 
Popkin. B. 
Powell. L. 
Reiser, W. 
Sanders, J. 

Sexton, C. 

Smith, C, 

Thompson, P. 

Toomey, A. 

Young, B. 

Stelling. K.. Alanager 

Cranston. C. Asst. Mgr. 




c 



K 



SCHEDULE FOR 1940 

Alarch 29 Wrens 

April 5 Columbia 

April 13 P. C. Freshmen 

April 19 Lanier High 

April 26 Boys High School 

May 3 Savannah High 

]\lay 11 __.G.LA.A. Tournament 

ACADEMY RECORDS SET IN 1939 



Shot Put 
Discus 
Javelin 
Broad Jump 



A. R. C. 71 
A. R. C. 62 
Duke Relays 
A. R. C. 63 
A. R. C. 37 
A. R. C. 58>^ 



46 ft. 5 in. Hal Prouty 

129 ft. lOyi in. Hal Prouty 

159 ft. 11 in. Gene Avery 

22 ft. 4 in. Harry Parrish 

SCORES 1939 

ColumlDia High 51 

Savannah High 60 

7th Place out of 24 Teams 

Wrens 27 

Lanier High 89 

Boys High 63>4 





RETURNING LETTER MEN 

Gene Avery _.„ Javelin. Discus, Shot 

Hank Caver Vault, Dashes 

Archie Atkinson Mile, Half-Mile 

Bill Barnes Mile, Half-Mile 

He\-\vard Bateman Dashes 

Edwin Marsh Broad Jump 

1940 Track Manager Kessel Stelling 



■^ 1940 HAin&OW 




Informal Pictures at The 
Augusta Country Club 



J.C.A. GOLF 



1940 TEAM 

Jackie Waller 
Joe Alulherin 
Joey F"uller 
Harcourt Waller 
Pat Calhoun 



1940 SCHEDULE 



March 30 


South Carolina 


Columbia 


April 11, 12, 13 


G.I.A.A. 


Athens 


April 20 


South Carolina 


Augusta 


April 27 


Georgia Freshmen 


Athens 


May 4 


Citadel 


Augusta 


May 11 


Georgia Freshmen 


Augusta 



Toe Mulherin "blasting out' 




LOW SCORES OF TEAM MEMBERS 

66 at Augusta Country Club Joe Mulherin 

70 at Augusta Country Clul) Jackie Waller 

71 at Augusta Country Club Harcourt Waller 

77 at Augusta Country Club Joey Fuller 

78 at Athens Country Club Pat Calhoun 




J.C.A. TENNIS 



1940 TEAM 

George Suhr 
Lloyd Stanford 
Tomm}- Houck 
Francis Jenny 
Bob Swan 
C. K. Lawrence 
Gene Gilbert 
Alfred Battey 
Johnny Kearns 
Louis Battey 




Lloyd Stanford in action at 
Augusta Country Club 




INDIVIDUAL TOURNAMENT WINNERS 

Augusta Trade District, Boys' Singles 1939 Francis Jenny- 
Augusta Trade District, Boys' Singles 1937 Johnny Kearns 

Augusta Cit)^ Tournament, Boys' Singles 1937 Johnny Kearns 

Augusta City Tournament, Boys' Doubles 1937 Johnny Kearns 

Academy of Richmond County Singles 1936 Johnny Kearns 

Augusta City Tournament, Boys' Doubles 1937 Gene Gilbert 



SCORES 

Wofford College 3 J.C.A. 1 

Wofford College 2 J.C.A. 2 

Emory at Oxford 3 J.C.A. 1 



"% 1940 HAinBOW 




Scene at Augusta 
Country Club 



A.R.C. GOLF 



1940 tp:am 

Steve Alulherin, Captain 

Gumm\- Harison 

Paul Hammock 

Ashby Taylor 

Phil Harison 

Geo. W. Ewing, Coach 



Golf is one of the more successful minor sports in the 
Academy. Bolstered from way back by such families as the 
Hummels, the Zimmermans. the Mulherins, the Ogilvies, the 
Wallers, and the Harisons, the A.R.C. golf teams have been 
successful in their quest for victories every year. This year, 
with Ashby Taylor, Steve Mulherin, Gummy and Phil Hari- 
son. and Paul Hammock all contributing to' make one of the 
finest golf teams ever produced at the Academy, we hope to 
have the most successful season yet. With these boys under 
the capable leadership of Coach George Ewing, we need have 
no fears over the 1940 Academy golf team. 



LOW SCORES OF TEAM MEMBERS 




69 at Augusta Country Club Ashby Taylor 

7i at .\ugusta Country Club... Gummj' Harison 

78 at Augusta Country Club Steve Mulherin 

80 at Augusta Country Club Phil Harison 

82 at -Augusta Country Club Paul Hammock 



Steve Mulherin on the 18th Green of 
the Augusta Country Club 



riH 



A.R.C. TENNIS 



1940 TEAM 

Jimmy Glickert 
Walton Hamilton 
Jack Bush 
Louis Browne 
Jimmy Chance 
James McNair 




Tennis has proved to be one of the most popular of the minor sports 
at the Academy, and its popularity has increased with each passing year. 




James McNair in action on 
the A. R. C. courts. 



•% 1940 RAIPBOW 




FACTS ABOUT OUR Stadium 



The Stadium of the Academy of Richmond County was erected by the Athletic Committee during 
the summer of 1930. It cost approximately $21,000.00 and was built with money saved by the Athletic 
Committee and the .Student Activities Committee Over a period of some fifteen or more years. The Sta- 
dium seats over 3,000 people and provides adequatt dressing and training rooms for the athletic teams. 
On Octol)er 11. 1930, the dedication ceremonies were held in the Stadium, our team playing their 
traditional rival, Riverside Military Academy. The dedication exercises presented a colorful spectacle. 
The Riverside student body and band, as well as Richmond's student body and band, participated in 
the ceremonies. Mr. M. T. Bryson, the chairman of the Athletic Committee, formally presented the 
Stadium to the Board of Education through the Board's president. Dr. George Woodbury. As a climax 
to the ceremonies, Richmond defeated their rivals bv a score of 12 to 0. Tatum Gressett was head coach 
at that time. 



During the years following the building of the stadium, it became increasingly evident that we 
needed to have our Stadium lighted for night games. In 1936, through the assistance of the City 
Council of Augusta, adequate lights were installed, thus greatly increasing the usefulness of the plant. 

Our Stadium is used by many and varied groups. The A.R.C. football teams, of course, play and 
practise there. The Boy Scouts hold their Annual Circus in the Stadium. The past three years have seen 
the Reserve Corps of the Marines use the field one night each week for drill. Our own Military Depart- 
ment holds the annual Prize Drill and the exercises for presentation of honors and awards in the 
Stadium, presenting a colorful and romantic climax to the year's activities. 

Our Stadium is an important asset to our school and to the City of Augusta. The Board of Educa- 
tion, the Athletic Association, the students of the Academy and Junior College, and the citizens of 
Augusta have made possible this valuable addition to nur school; we are indebted to all who have 
participated in giving us the Stadium. 



ACnVE UFE ON OUR 



Qym 



When the Richmond Academy building was erected in 1925, the Building Committee of 
the Board of Education, recognizing- the need of an adequate gymnasium, had the architects 
include the present gymnasium and dressing and shower rooms in their plans. From the be- 
ginning the gym has proved itself an important part of our school, and has I^ecome increas- 
ingly important in the life and activities of the school. 

There is scarcely any time during the year when the gym is not in use. During the entire 
school session some form of athletic activity is taking place, from drill for the football team 
on rainy days in the fall of the year to the climax of basketball games of the Academy, Junior 
College, and Grammar School League in the spring of the )-ear. The gym has been used for 
regular gym classes, although at present, because of finances, this part of our school curricu- 
lum is temporarily suspended. In particular, the gym is adapted to basketball ; it has one of 
the finest basketball courts of an}' gym in the State, and has been the arena of many hard 
fought and important games with Richmond's G.I. A. A. rivals. 

The gym is unusually well adapted for dances. It has been the scene of many colorful 
and picturesque Student Council dances. The climax of the social season of the school, and 
the last of the dances held here is the Annual Commencement Hop. Many a sweet conquest 
has been made at the school dances, and perhaps it is as the scene of such activities as these 
that the girls, and boys too, will best remember in the years to come our Gvmnasium. 





THE Varsity club 



1st Row 


2nd Row 


3rd Row 


4th Row 


Mary Stulb 


Carl Lawrence 


George Barnes 


Joe Mulhcrin 


Georgia Paquette 


John Burroughs 


Gummy Harison 


Joey Fuller 


Maxine Farr 


Jimmy Nowell 


Archie Atkinson 


Louis Ross 


Dot Tiinm 


Harry Popkin 


Heywood Batenian 


Bubber Cole 


Hazel Allen 


Ernest Wiggins 


Osborne Stelling 


Hank Caver 


\'irgiiiia Carpenter 


Julian Bahlnwski 


Tom Gwin 


Carl Sanders 




Harcourt \^'aller 


Robert Wilkinson 


Roy Rr-gcrs 




Jimmie Cooper 


David Stevens 


Biliv Powers 




Frank Inman 


Charles Kimbrell 


Bobby Baker 




I-uke Rushton 


O'Neal Cave 


Jack Hains 






Charles A.skey 


Tones Epps 
Ed Bryant 




5th Row 


6th Row 






Roliert O'Conner 


EU'ott I'omerance 






Gene Gilbert 


Ben Popkin 






Wayne Barnes 


Jerry Marsli 






Bill Maulflin 


Jack Atkinson 






Roscoe Lowery 


Mike Hummel 






Jackie Waller 


George Stulb 






Julian WilHngham 


Ralph Chaney 






Bill Young 


Clinton Strother 






Bernard Mitchum 


Gene Avery 






Bob Stark 


Lloyd Stanford 






Buford Scott 








James McNair 








Joe Murray 








t 



eatures 






tZ4/at 



CARL SIMON 

Sophomore Valedictorian 





JAMES HILL 
Senior Valedictorian 




* „ * 






ll^^ 



HENRY CAVER 
Best All-round Senior 





-^^ 



BUBBER COLE 

Most Popular Senior 





1 



\ 



I 



\ 



\ 



J^i^. -Ml,.- f- tf ih .. 



EUGENE AVERY 
Best Senior Athlete 





WALTER REISER 
Best All-round Freshman 




DOROTHY DOUGLAS 

Most Popular Freshman Girl 



^ 








im^^^ 



JIMMY NOWELL 

Most Popular Freshman Boy 





^ 



MARGARET SHEFTALL 
Best All-round Sophomore Girl 





! 



t 



^W' 

^''^.. 




JACK MAINS 
Best All-round Sophomore Boy 



i^ 



J. C. A. Sophomores 

Maxine Farr 
Betty Andrews 
Georgia Paquette 
Teeny Tucker 
Margaret Slieftall 



Contestants in 1940 Fashion Show 

J. C. A. Freshmen 



Dot Donglas 
Alary Emma Pierce 
Lucille Blackwell 
Mary Anne Toole 
Kathryn Arrington 



Tubman Seniors 

Alice Grady 
Corinne Elliott 
Neville Gumming 
Frances Gapers 
Gloria Wright 




Beauties 



MISS 
TEENY TUCKER 





MISS 
MARGARET SHEFTALL 




MISS BETTY ANDREWS 
Most Beautiful Sophomore 



Beauties 



MISS 
MARY ANNE TOOLE 





^-»^ 






MISS 
LUCILLE BLACKWELL 





MISS DOROTHY DOUGLAS 

Most Beautiful Freshman 
Most Fashionable Freshman 



Beauties 



MISS 
FRANCES CAPERS 




/ 



I 




MISS 
NEVILLE CUMMING 




Elizabeth Bryans and Donald 
Bailie are two of the most 
popular dancers in Augusta. 
This picture was taken at the 
Thanksgiving Dance for bene- 
fit of the 1940 "Rainbow." 





The 1940 



•k 



Margaret Sheltal 
Editor-in-Cliief 



Carl .Simon 
llii iness Man.ager 



1 luhcrt King 
Asst. Editor-in-Chief 



Jani?- I )unhar 
Literary Editor 



\\'alter Reiser 
Asso. Literary Editor 



Elizabeth Bryans Sara Jane Chapman Maxine Farr 

Literary Editor Art Editor Actiyities Editor 





Shown seated, selecting the cover for 
the !940 "Rainbow". (Left to right). 

I'"ish Wiggins 

Margaret Sheftall 
Carl Simon 

Hubert King 



Rainbow 




iV 




Lloyd Stanford Mary Elizabeth Paulk 

Advertising Manager Subscription Manager 

Georgia Paquette Ernest Wiggins 

Business Staff Asst. Business Manager 



Alfred Battey 


Jimmy Nowell 


Military Editor 


Sports Editor 


Agnes Reese 


Tom Gwin 


Picture Editor 


Picture Editor 


Robert Barbin 


Mac Rhodes 


Staff Photographer 


Snapshots Editor 


Frankie Morgan 


Mr. E. M. Allen 


Business Staff 


Faculty Adviser 




NEW MEMBERS 
Hank Caver Frank Inman 

Bernard Mitchum Louis Ross 



GOLD 




CLUB 



The Gold "R" Society, founded in 1931. is recog- 
nized as the outstanding honor organization of the 
Academy. Its jnirpose is to stimvdate the interest of 
students in all liranches of student activity. Points 
counting toward the forty required for election to 
membership may be obtained in scholarship, ath- 
letics, R.O.T.C., and general student activities, in- 
cluding work on publications, declamation, and 
debate teams, glee clul^. and orchestra, and special 
contests that reflect credit on the school. Points in 
leadership are awarded to class officers, members 
of the student council, and captains of teams. Stud- 
ents are not awarded a Gold "R" unless they live up 
to the highest standards of character and maintain 
a satisfactory scholastic record. 



OLD MEMBERS 

G. Holstein Parks 
Carl J. Simon 
Lloyd A. Stanford 
Walter A. Reiser 

Jones Epps 
Jimmy Xowell 
Harcourt Waller 
Jack Hains 




Ik 1940 aAlPBOW 



THE 




COUNCIL 



J.C.A. Sophomores — Alfred Battey, Jack Hains, 
Betty Andrews. 

J.C.A. Freshmen — ^^^alter Reiser, Louis Battey, 
Pat Calhoun. 

A.R.C. Seniors — Henry Caver, Bernard Mitcli- 
um. Louis Ross. 

A.R.C. Juniors — Joe Murray, Edward Barton, 
Ashby Taylor (not pictured). 

A. .R. C. Sophomores — Shealy Reiser, Billy 
Chandler, Paul Thompson. 

A.R.C. Freshmen (not pictured) — William 
Reiser, Clarence Mobley, Howard Willis. 

President of Student Council — Jack Hains. 





The Student Council is composed of 
eighteen members : the class president 
and two representatives from each of 
the six classes. The council sponsors 
all the school dances. The members of 
the Student Council cooperated with 
the Annual Staff in raising the required 
number of subscriptions for the 1940 
"Rainbow", and they had a large part 
in the success of this vearbook. 




Betty Andrews 
Helen Battle 

W. T. Brown 

Margaret Coclin 
Janis Dunbar 



Constance Elliott 
Francis Jenny 

Margaret Matthews 
Joe Mulherin 

Mose Murphey 



Mary Elizabeth Paulk 

Maragaret Sheftall 
Carl Simon 

Miriam Talbert 




PHI THETA KAPPA 

Phi Thela Kappa is a non-secret honorary organization. A student must have a general average 
for the first three semesters in all work scheduled of 90% or alcove. The object of this fraternity is to 
promote scholarship, to develop character, and to cultivate fellowship among the students of both sexes 
of the Junior Colleges of the United States. 

The Phi Theta Kappa Key is a symbol for the high idealism of the members of this select group. 
This key is a golden slab keyed at the top and bottom. The gold field refers to the golden opportunities 
abounding on every hand. Across the slab is a black band wliich stands for the three ideals that band 
us together and for self-control which is the foundation of Wisdom, Aspiration, and Purity. Shining 
through this black background are the three Greek words meaning \\'isdom, Aspiration, and Purity. 
On one side is a wreath of oak leaves, standing for stability and strength characterized by the oak. 
Tile other side of the wreath has the leaves of the laurel signifying achievement and success; all of 
these attributes are necessary for membershi]3 in this fraternity. Above the band is the head of Minerva, 
the goddess of Learnins:. 




Honorary 
Members 



E. M. Allen 
C. G. Cordle 

N. L. Galloway 
H. O. Read 




OFFICERS 



President . . . 
\'ice-President . 
Secretary . . . . 
Council Member . 
Honorarv Member 



. Carl Simon 
Joe Mulherin 

Mary E. Paulk 
. Janis Dunbar 
iMr. I. T. Hains 




CLUB 



Officers 

President Constance S. Elliott 

A'ice-President Teeny Tucker 

Secretarv Elle Carswell 

Treasurer Bettv Andrews 




The Spanish Club was organized at the beginning 
of the school year. The purpose was to create 
better feeling among the Junior College students 
taking Spanish, and to increase these students' 
Spanish-speaking ability. 

Meetings are held bi-monthly at the homes of 
the various members, and a period of recreation is 
held after each meeting. The small dues paid each 
week are held in reserve for at least two social 
functions which take place annually. 

The club belongs to the International Student 
Society, a national organization, from which it 
received a charter and pins. 



At the end of the first semes- 
ter, all high school boys making 
an honor grade were permitted 
to join the Spanish Club. 




ROSTER 

1st Row — Dot Marsh, Myra 
Scott, Hazel McDonald, 
Marjorie HurllDutt. 

2nd Row — Millwee Owens, 
Elizabeth Graham, Mimi 
Torpin, M. K. Steinberg. 

3rd Row — Albert McGuire, 
Mac Rhodes, Prof. John 
DeNoia. 




PRE-LAW 

Cliih 



President Lawrence Buckley 

A'ice-President Ir\in Daitch 

Secretar_\- Cooper Warr 

Treasurer John Bracey 









1/ 


k 




T 


W<1 


1 




4 


Battey, 


A. 


Goldberg. 


S. 




Chase, 


H. 


Haynie, 


M. 


Hull, J. 






Smith, 


\V 


. H 


Houck, 


T. 


Cordle, C. 


G. 




Read, 


H 


O. 



SECOND SEMESTER OFFICERS 

President Jim Hull 

Vice-President Tommy Houck 

Secretary Bill Smith 

Treasurer C. K. Lawrence 



The Pre-Law Cluh is one of the oldest cluhs in the schot)l. 
It was organized for the purpose of acquainting; interested 
boys with the profession of law. The club meets everj- Wed- 
nesday night at 7:30 P. J\L at the Y.M.C.A, During the past 
year, the club has sponsored numerous social and educational 
events; among them being "steak fries", trials, bancpiets, and 
many interesting lectures from prominent local attorneys. As 
a result of the work of this club, many of the past members 
have been helped to become well-known lawyers. 



"% IWu ftAinBOW 





Scene from 1939 production 




The Glee Club 



Mr. N. L. Galloway, Director 



Catherine Gehrken 
Anne Hammett 
Walter Reiser 
Virginia Carpenter 
Constance Elliott 
Evelyn Bates 
Annette Bates 
Helen Battle 
John Ball Burroughs 
Mary Anne Toole 
Dorothy Roesel 
Helen Sutton 
Margaret Sheftall 
Osborne Stelling 
Audrey Brunkhurst 
Thomas Houck 



Robert Jeffcoat 
Leonard Powell 
Julian Willingham 
Paul Chance 
Carl Lawrence 
Jim Hull 
Warren Hamilton 
Billy Cooper 
W. T. Brown 
John Roesel 
Jay Dunaway 
Elle Carswell 
Maxine Farr 
Leon Rountree 
Jimmy Nowell 
E. W. Wiggins 



A "Jarn Session" with Maestro 
Galloway conducting. 



1940 was a big year for Mr. GalloAvay's Glee Club mem- 
bers. First, they produced a Gypsy operetta "Choquita", which 
was a real success. Then, the boys and girls had so much fun 
together and cooperated so well with their vocal talents, that 
Mr. Galloway decided to take them on several out-of-town 
trips. With this promise as an incentive, the membership of 
the club increased. And with Mr. Anderson as pianist, and 
Mr. H. O. Read, as adviser, the club reached a new high in 
skill and recreation. 




Rho Chi PRE-MEDICAL FRATERNITY 




Joe Mulherin 

Elliott Pomerance 

Louis Battev 



Alfred Batte}- James McElmurray Jack Hagler 

Nathan Gillniaii Max Steinberg Jones Epps 

H. O. Read J. M. Ellis C. A. Scruggs 



The Rho Chi is an organization made 
up entirely of pre-medical students. The 
object of this organization is to brmg 
togetht-r the pre^uedical students and 
to create interest in the pre-medical 
work in Junior College. The Rho Chi 
holds its meeting every other Tuesday 
night at the Y.M.C.A. During the year 
many ])rominent medical men talked at 
the meetings. X'arious luedical subjects 
were discussed. Also of great interest 
were the movies of surgical operations 
that were shown a number of times 
this year. Several trips were taken to 
the hospital where lectures on pharmacy 
were given and exhibitions of surgery 
were ,-hown. Socials were also given 
throughout the year. These included 
steak fries, parties, and banquets, which 
were attended and enjoyed by all. 



Faculty .\dviser 



Faculty Adviser 



Faculty Adviser 



OFFICERS 

President .... I.loyd Stanford 
\'ice-President .... Tom Deas 
Secrjtar\--Treas. . . Kdward Teuton 



'Ik 1940 RAinBOW 





ridEfc ^it ' 



THE Musketeer 

Campus Newspaper 



"The Musketeer," official newspaper of the 
A.R.C.-J.C.A. student body, was published four 
times a semester by the staff under the direction of 
Air. W. P. Watkins. The members of the editorial 
staff" were handicapped by lack of experience, but 
they stuck to their guns and turned out a wonder- 
ful job. 




Here are the editors discussing- the make-up 
of the school paper. Left right, they are : 
T..ane Jackson, Walter Reiser, and Harry 
Popkin. 



THE mJ^'KEIYER 



ROTC Promotians. Scholarships Offered Fashion Show and Valedidorians and 
Transfer. Etc .^lade To 1940 Gradnates Beautj Contest Held Honors .\nnounced 






. Cadets to Parade: 
Inspector Coming 



The purpose of "The Musketeer" is to give the 
students a picture of the important happenings 
around the campus and to promote the interests 
of the school in any way possible. Each member of 
the staff is assigned to several different clubs, and 
it is his duty to report all the important happenings 
for the paper. News outside of the clubs is gathered 
by special reporters. There are also several column- 
ists, who write the featured columns such as 
"Whispers", "Gems From Other Mines", etc. 






chuol Librao Full 
of .4ctivily. Books 



"The Musketeer" of February 13 



1st Row — Ward, C. ; King, H ; Bowyer, 
M. ; Inman, F. ; Evans. E. 

2nd Row — Blanos, M. ; Reiser, S. ; Gav- 
alas, N. ; Agostas, M. ; Agostas, W. ; 
Marriott, T. ; Popkin, B. 

3rd Row — Bvington, B.; Salley, F. ; 
Paquette, G. ; Toole, M.; Black- 
well, L.; Alullin, M.; Nowell, J.; 
Reese. A. ; Goldman, E. 

4th Row — Stelling, K. ; Phinizy. C. ; 
Gwin, T. ; Goldberg, O. ; Johnson, 
].. ; Reiser, W. ; Popkin, H. ; Bur- 
roughs, J. 




THE J. C. A. Y.W.C.A. 




Offi 



cers 



President Elle Carswell 

Secretary .... Martha Stelling 

Treasurer Dot Douglas 

Vice-President . . Margaret Sheftall 
(Left to Right) 




Hazel Allen 
Helen Battle 
Joanne Bailey 
Katherine Best 
Audrey Brunkhurst 
Virginia Carpenter 
Evelyn Chandler 
Sara Jane Chapman 
Margaret Coclin 
Ottie DeMore 
Frances Dunbar 
Mary Dunbar 
Constance Elliott 
Maxine Farr 
Kate Gercke 
Anne Hammett 
Mary Hallinan 
Helen Hull 
Doris Kessler 
Helen King 
Dorothy Marsh 
Kita May 
Lillian Melvin 



Frankie Morgan 
Mabel Murray 
Mildred Milligan 
Mary Claire Nevin 
Constance Olive 
Georgia Paquette 
Frances M. Patterson 
Elizabeth Peebles 
Mary Emma Pierce 
Agnes Reese 
Doris Robins 
Dorothy Roesel 
Dorothy Ann Starr 
Alary Stafford 
Marguerite Symms 
Miriam Talbert 
Dorothy Timm 
Mary .A.nne Toole 
Laura Trowbridge 
Helen Walker 
Anne Wilson 
Doris Wood 



Ik 1940 RAinBOW^ 




Alfred Battey 
President 




Tom Gwin 
Vice-President 




O'Neal Cave 
Secretary- 




Bill Byington 
Treasurer 




J. M. Ellis 
Faculty Adviser 




Louis Battev 
Bill Balk ' 
Holste-'n Parker 



Jack Haiiis 

Luke Rushton 

Charles Kimbrell 



Walter Reiser 
Tom Wong 
Mac Rhodes 



Billy Cooper 

Bobby Baker 

Kenneth Gurlev 



SECOND SEMESTER OFFICERS 
O'Neal Cave .... President Bill Byington . . Vice-President 
Walter Reiser .... Secretary Joey Fuller Treasurer 

The J.C.A. Hi-Y, one of the most outstanding; organizations atnong 
the members of the student body, is composed of the most prominent 
boys in J. C. A. Before a boy can be elected into the club, he must be 
unanimously approved by all the members. 

The purpose of the Hi-Y is to instill in the youth of today the 
principles of Christian character. Each j-ear the J.C.A. Hi-Y conducts 
a Bible study course which is prepared by the State Hi-Y headquarters. 
The J.C.A. group is afifiliated with the state and national Hi-Y organiza- 
tions, and J.C.A. representatives attend all the statewide conferences 
and conventions. 

A secondary purpose of the club is to provide entertainment for 
the tnembers, and this purpose was indeed realized this year. The out- 
standing social events were the semi-monthly joint banquets with the 
girls' Y.W.C.A. Club. These banquets were an innovation this year, and 
their success insures their continuance. 

In every way, the J.C.A. Hi-Y had a very successful year, and the 
retiring members look forward to an even better year in 1941. 



J. C. A. HI-Y 




ACADEMY 



Hi-Y 



The Acadeni}- Hi-V has as its purpose: To 
create, maintain, and extend throughout the 
school and coninnmity, high standards of 
christian character". 

The club is made up of twentj'-five boys 
selected from the three upper classes of the 
Richmond Academy. These boys are selected 
on the basis of their character, scholarship, and 
extra-curricula activities. 

Aleetings (if the club are held every Monday 
night at the Y.M.C.A. under the supervision of 
Major W. A. Elliott, faculty adviser. 




Louis Browne 
President 



Frank Inman 
Secretary 



James Hill 
Chaplain 



Roscoe Lowery 
\'ice-President 



Officers of the club are elected semi-annually 
at the first meeting of each semester. Officers 

for the first semester of the 1939-40 school year were : Frank Inman, President ; Haywood Bateman, Vice-President ; 
Louis Browne, Secretary; John Burroughs, Treasurer; Gene Avery, Chaplain, and Louis Ross, Sergeant-at-Arms. 
The officers for the second semester were: Louis Browne, President; Roscoe Lowery, Vice-President; Frank In- 
man, Secretary; Hubert King. Treasurer; James Hill, Chaplain, and Gene Avery, Sergeant-at-Arms. 

A few of the important speakers to address the club recently have been Dr. Leonard KnoAvles, Dean A. P. 
Markert, and Wild Life Ranger Ed Friend. 

Among the more important jrojects of the Club have been Christmas and Thanksgiving offerings for distribu- 
tion to the needy. The present club hopes that the high ideals of the Hi-Y may be maintained in the Academy 
during the ensuing years. 




1st Row — Phil Scroggs, Haywood 
Bateman, Hubert King, Jack 
Bush, Raymond Hargrove. 

Jnd Row — Theo Thevaos. Jerry 
Marsh. Louis Browne, Jack 
Capers. 

3rd Row — Frank Inman, John 
lUirroughs, Sammy Heaton, 
Carl Sanders, and James Hill. 

Xot in Picture — Louis Ross, Gene 
Avery. I'ernard Collier, Jack 
Croft, Tom Hutto^ Clarence 
Sikes, "Duke" Newton, Man- 
uel Blanos, .'\rthur Mosely, 
Shealy Reiser, Jack Black, 
Roscoe Lowery. 



^e 1940 RAinBOW' 



RICHMOND 



Hi- 



Mr. F. M. Harriss 

Mr. A. E. Anderson 



Y 



Phinizy, C. 



The purpose of the Richmond Hi-Y 
is to create, maintain, and extend 
throughout the school and community- 
high standards of Christian character. 

There is a total of thirty members in 
the dull. The boys in the club are se- 
lected from the three upper classes of 
the Richmond Academy. They are se- 
lected on the basis of their character, 
and extra-curricula activities. 

The meetings are held every Tuesday 
night at 7:30. The faculty advisers are 
Mr. G. L. Bolton, Mr. A.' E. Anderson, 
and Mr. F. M. Harriss. These fine ad- 
visers are assisted by Mr. Parker, who 
is the Boys Secretary of the Y.M.C.A. 

The officers are elected at the begin- 
ning of the semester. For the first sem- 
ester they were : Rudolph Chaney, pres- 
dent ; Ralph Chaney, vice-president; 
Robert O'Connor, secretary ; "Digger" 
Jordan, treasurer; Bob Sherman, chap- 
lain; and Dugie Jennings, sergeant-at- 
arms. The officers for the second semes- 
ter arc : Wayland Cato, president ; Bob 
Sherman, vice-president ; Allston Bailie, 
secretarv ; jimmie ?ilorehouse, treasur- 
er; Guy Lewis, chaplain; and Ralph 
Chancy, sergeant-at-arms. 

Among the most important projects 
of the club have been the giving of 
Thanksgiving and Christmas baskets 
to the needy — and the presentation of 
the National Hi-Y picture to the school 
lilirary. 

During the second semester, the club 
selected a fine program committee. 
This committee came forward with a 
program on vocations and hobbies. 
Inteiesting programs filled the whole 
semester with entertainment and edu- 
cation. 



Barrett, A. 
Lewis, G. 

Morehouse, J. 



Barton, Bill 

Barton, Ed 

Murray, J. 



Cato, Wayland 
Bailie, Allston 
lennings, D. 



Graves. D. 

Aycock, M. 
Ross, J. 



Cato, Edgar 
Hng-ler. G. 

Dolan, B. 



Gibson. A. 

Thompson, P. 





Rudolph Chaney Ralph Chaney Robert O'Connor Digger Jordan 
President \"ice-President Secretary Treasurer 




JUNIOR 
COLLEGE 



Literary 



SOCIETY 




1st Row 
Toole, Mary Anne 
Douglas, Dorothy 
Bates, Annette 
Salley, Fritz 
Symms. Marguerite 
Hull. Helen 
Reese, Agnes 
Bates, Evelyn 
Hammert. Anne 
Chapman, Sara J. 



2nd Row 
King, Helen 
Reiser, \\'alter 
Stulb, Mary 
Roesel. John 
Brown, W. T. 
Sheftall, Margaret 
Koch. Bernard 
Bailey, Joanne 
Carpenter, \'irginia 



3rd Row 
Jackson. Lloyd 
Bruckner, Albert 
Sutton. Helen 
Haynie. Mack 
Coclin. Margaret 
Battle. Helen 
Torpin. Mimi 
Allen. Hazel 
Gurlev, Kenneth 



4th Row 
Byington, Bill 
Waller. Harcourt 
Xowell, Jimmy 
Boiter. Albert 
Moore, Mr. J. B. 
Whitaker, Miriam 
Scott, Myra 
^\ ilson. Anne 
DeMore. Ottie 




. / t 



Offi 



cers 



f 


rl 


President Fritz Salley 


^ { 


f 


\'ice-President . . . Helen Sutton 
Sec'y-Treas. . . Alarguerite Symms 


'm»>^ 


•^■m 


Program Chairman . Helen Hull 


i 


' 


I'ublicitv . . . . ' A»"'eHammett 
( Agnes Reese 



»v— ^JA ..vi..ii,_J. -.■ 



'vfe 1940 ftAIRBOW' 



Freshman Literary Society 

OFFICERS 

Presidtiit Julius Rucker 

A'ice-President Carter Robinson 

Secretar\' and Treasurer . . . Forrest Patterson 





Faculty Supervisor 
Mr. Frank Harriss 

Meetings every Friday at the 
end of the fifth period. 



Members of 1940 Society 



1st Row 

Julius Rucker 
J. G. Clark 
Allen Maxwell 
Julian Fiske 
Clififord Christian 
Calvin Benson 



2nd Row 

William Rowe 
Albert Bailey 
Harris Clay 
Henry Bailey 
James Rhodes 
Forrest Patterson 



3rd Row 

Charles Pennington 
Stephen Sands 
Carter Robinson 
Elwood Miller 
Lawrence Morris 
Marion Blackwell 




RED CROSS LIFE SAVERS CLUB 




Harhin. Robert 
Kessler, Doris 
Best. Kathryn 
Murray, Mahel 
Stulh, Mary 
Cooper, Jininiie 
MeK'in, Lillian 



Toole, Mary Anne 
Douglas. Dorothy 
Milligan, Mildred 
Xowcll. Jininiy 
Baldowski. Julian 
Wilson. Anne 
Wiggins. Ernest 



Reiser. Walter 
Trowbridge, Laura 
Waagner. Margaret 

Elliott, Constance 
Hancock. Reginald 
l!alk. Mill 
(iwin, Thomas 
CosI)y, Ray 



Each member of the Red Cross Life Savers 
Club has passed a course in Life Saving under 
a qualified instructor. At the end of two weeks 
during which the boys and girls were recpiired 
to spend two hours in the water dail}', they were 
given an exam, in which each life saver had to 
demonstrate his ability to save a life. The 
courses were given at local bathing pt)nds. 



'% 1940 ftAIPBOW 




ALPHA LAMBDA SIGMA 




Alpha Lambda Sigma was founded by several of the 
prominent members and literary leaders of the class of 
1937. namely : Claude Hill. Eugene Goetchius, Leslie 
Youngblood, Bill Cochrane, and Paul Bailey. This group 
cf young- worthies threw out bodil}^ the old Literary 
Society which used to meet once a week at the end of the 
sixth period. They then proceeded to draw up a constitu- 
tion, and. in fact, formed a totally new Literary Society. 

Officers are elected at the first meeting of each sem- 
ester. Great rivalry was shown l^etween the opposing sides 
in this affair, and the club quickly split into opposing 
political parties which wielded great influence in the 
elections. At the finish, however, all the members pro- 
fessed to be thoroughly satisfied with the results. 

Aleetings are usually held in a prevailing atmosphere 
of parliamentary procedure, but at times unwarranted ^ 
outbursts of some of the meinbers lend meaning to the 
oft-quoted proverb. "Boys will be boys." 

The programs. Avhich are constantly improving, are 
usually very interesting. The participants in the programs 
gain valuable experience in the arts of public speaking, 
declaiming, debating, etc. Several interesting debates have 
been held, news has been aptly summarized and edited 
for the benefit of the members, and jokes told. 

The only thing upon which all the members have 
agreed is that they have the best and most dependable 
faculty advisers of any club on the campus. They are 
Messrs. Hughey and Hardy. 



1st Row— Bailie. A. ; Lew. J. ; Wolff. VV. ; King, 
H.; Lewis. G. ; Hill. J.; Levy. H. 

2nd Row — Thevaos, T. ; Hamilton. W. ; Bush, 
W. ; Jackson, E. ; Compton, L. ; Marriott, 
T.; Houck. K. 

3rd Row — Steinberg. M. ; Heaton. S. ; Hutto, 
T. ; Agostas. W. ; Stelling, K. ; Moseley, A. ; 
Lee. J.; Murphe}-, A. 

4th Row— Houck, P.; Purkall. B. ; Stevens. D.; 
Hull, N. ; Sherman, J. 



FfRST TERM OFFICERS 

President Hubert King 

\'ice-President Bernard Wolff 

Secretary Jean Levy 

Treasurer Allston Bailie 

SECOND TERxM OFFICERS 

President Bernard Wolff 

\''ice-President Allston Bailie 

Secretary Jean Levy 

Treasurer Kessel Stelling 

Sergeant-at-Arms .... Theo Thevaos 












y 


1 






X 


' 




\ 


{ 


w 


1 










^^5 


1 




Connie Elliott 
Rita May 



Teeny Tucker 
Constance Olive 



Kile Carswell Betty Andrews 

Mary Elizabeth Paulk Elizabeth Peeples 



Julia Hill 
Alary Emma Pierce 



President Constance S. Elliott 

Vice-President Teeny Tucker 

Secretary Elle Carswell 

Treasurer Betty Andrews 

THE 

SIGMA DELTA CHI 

is the oldest sororit}^ at J. C. A. Tt was organized for the 
purpose of establishing permanent and sincere friendships. 



SIGMA DELTA 
CHI SORORITY 



Ik 1940 RAinBOW 




INITIATION WEEK 
The Rats: Olive, Balk. May, Pierce, Peeples 



ZETA RHO 
SIGMA SORORITY 




Sis Bryans 
President 



Georgia Paquette 
Secretary 



Margaret Sheftall 



Treasurer 




Standing 

Kate Gercke 
Mary Anne Toole 
Bonnie Newberry 
Mary Stafford 
Martha Fleming 



Seated 



Dot Douglas 
Margaret Sheftall 
Sis Bryans 
Georgia Paquette 
Maxine Farr 




Marian Capers 
Evelyn Chandler 
Frankie Morgan 
Dorothy Anne Starr 




Maxine Farr 

Bonnie Newberry 
Marian Capers 
Kate Gercke 



Frankie Morgan 
Evelyn Chandler 
Martha Fleming 
Mary Stafford 





DeMolay 



The Order of DeMolay is one of the finest and strongest orgrinizations for youth in America 
today. In its halls are taught invaluable lessons which prepare its }outh for approaching manhood. 
DeMolay endeavors to Ijridge the gap between this >-outh and manhood. Some of the more important 
j)rinci]jles are: Cleanness in thought, word, body, and deed; Reverence for all things sacred; Courtesy 
toward all with whom the DeMolay comes in contact; Fidelity to his ideals, to his comrades, and to 
his obligations; Patriotism — a love of country which makes him live worthily in time of peace or die 
bravely if the need arise; Filial Love that is so often lacking in the young man of today; and Comrade- 
ship that enriches and ennobles his life. 

These, and many more are the lessons taught bv the ( )rcler of DeMolay. 

The .'Vugusta Chapter, Order of DeMolay. is noted for its dances and socials. The dances it spon- 
sors are rated by many the best in Augusta. 



One of the many features of the 
DeMolay initiations is their "Clean Up" 
campaign. Five "rats", Morris Stein- 
berg, Kessel Stelling, Sewell Elliott, 
H. T. Evans, and Billy Agostas, pa- 
triotically spent an afternrjon cleaning 
Board Street from 7th to 9th Streets. 
The "rats" then sang, danced, and end- 
ed the evening by being arrested for 
vagrancy. All in fun. of course. This is 
known in DeMolay as the Sportsman- 
ship Degree, and is an essential part 
of the initiation (jf all DeMolays. 




'% 1940 RAIPBOW 



DeMolav Officers 

Lloyd Stanford Master Councillor 

Betty Andrews DeMolay Sponsor 

J. D. Harvley. ]r Senior Councillor 

Leon Simon. Jr Junior Ccjuncillor 

^^'. T. Brown. Jr Scribe 

David Stevens Treasurer 





Bailey, W 
Calhoun, P. 
Bruker, C. 
Roesel, J. 
Haynie, M. 



Purkall, B. 
Carter, H. 
Evans, H. T. 
Agostas, W. 
Jumper, J. 



Willingham, J 






Webb, C. J. 






Rountree, 


L. 




Stelling 


K 




Broome, 


E 


Wilkinson, R. 


J. 




Duncan, J. 


B. 




Simon, C. 


J. 




Barbin, 


R. 




Fund, 


H. 





"^ 1940 ftAinBOW 




charter Club Members 




The 



Hangovers 



Club 



Seated 

Howard Mcintosh 
Jarrell Sheppard 
Alfred Battey 
Jack Boardman 
(_)tis Hambv 



Standing 

Billy Wheeless 
Alex Barrett 
Ernest Wig-gins 
Jnlian Baldowski 
B. Roy Smith 
Tom Gwin 



Three years ago. a group of boys 
founded the now well-known "Hang- 
over Clula." Its purpose is to "create", 
maintain, and execute a real school 
spirit." The charter members have ac- 
complished this purpose, and they fur- 
in iiic yuuiig r.Vv.m-hool spirit for all our activities. 
Hangovers' stunt in Stunt Night 
for two consecutive years. The 
who are members in this club are 
anent members and no other boys 
taken in. J.C.A. owes a lot of its 
t to these "pals" who really hang 
ther. 



"der of DeMolay 
its dances and so(' 



THE RED X SOCIETY 

The Red X Society was formed by Jones Epps. Bernard Koch, and Hubert Bentley. Its main 
purpose is one of recreation and fellowship. The m ;mbership is limited to fifteen boys, and these boys 
are chosen with regard to sportsmanshi]:i. 




Paul Haminack 
Jones Epps 

Hubert Bentley 
Paul Amos 
Jack Hoover 



Bernard Koch 
Billy Britton 
Euley Weathers 
Ray Cosby 
Bill Readv 




Co-op 

CLUB 



President and Treasurer 
David Stevens 

Entertainment Committee 
Albert Evans 
Robert Wilkinson 
David Stevens 




1st Row 

Lamar Watkins 
Harry Pritchard 
Thomas Mobley 
Joe Belding 
Joe Sturgis 



2nd Row 

Robert Wilkinson 
Albert Evans 
Donald Whitley 
Allen Harmon 
Willie Phillips 



3rd Row 

Marshall Brandenburg 
Hinton Stoudemire 
Fred James 
Curtis Ford 
William Smith 



4th Row 

Billy Harrison 
Vaughan Fletcher 
Ralph Grant 
Bennie Lucas 
David Stevens 



Faculty Adviser Mr. Jack Williams 



Our club is composed of boj's who have the same idea in mind ; namely : to study the trade in 
which we are most interested both from a theoretical and from a practical standpoint. We enjoy our 
contacts on the "job" during afternoons; then bring our problems to class where we discuss them to 
the advantage of all members present. 

The \'ocational Conference Club provides a means for expressing our talents through the medium 
of our head, hands, and heart. 

Jack Williams, Coordinator. 




Leftovers 



(Left to right} 

Kenneth Gurley 
Harcourt Waller 
Reginald Hancock 
C. B. Thurmond 
Robert Barbin 
Jay Dunaway 



The Leftovers proudly point out that 
they took the title of "Stunt Night 
Winners' away from the Hangovers 
this vtar. 



Ik 1940 HAinBOW 



Camera 



CLUB 



In trees, on roofs, up flagpoles 
you climb ; 

You creep and sneak and slip 
up behind. 

Your snapshots don't flatter, 
1 hat's not your concern ; 

Cause you camera fiends love 

'em — 
Thc:se snapshots that burn. 

But the Annual Staff thanks 
You with praises galore. 
We used all your snaps 
And we shouted for more. 




C.ViMERA CLUB MEMBERS 




Janelle Kemp 
Helen Hunter 
Robert Barbin 
Dot Roesel 
Lillian Melvin 
Kathryn Best 
Dot Starr 
Joanne Bailey 
Jimmy Nowell 
Billy Seigler 
Mac Rhodes 



Parker Cole 
\Valton Hamilton 
Arthur Cole 
Guy Lewis 
Anderson Capers 
Joseph Caldwell 
Clayton Boardman 
Harris Clay 
Alex Murphy 
Tom Hutto 
Oliver Granade 



Mr. Felder. faculty achiser of the 
Camera Cluli, to whom we gi\e our 
most sincere thanks for his many pic- 
tures that adorn nur annual. 



The Camera Club's dark ronm. especially ec|uipped for the 
** *^ use of the club this year. 





Engler Inman Gibson Aycock Bates Heaton Murphy Clark Marriott Purkall 



S. O. S. CLUB 

President , Ed Barton 

Vice-President ; .- Mel Aycock 

Secretary and Treasurer Sammy Heaton 

"Musketeer" Reporter Tom Marriott 

Faculty Adviser Mr. Derrick 



S.O.S. stands for, Students of Science. This is the only high 
school science group with a national organization. Members of 
this national organization publish "The Science Leaflet." This 
magazine contains articles written by high school students. 

The S.O.S. Club was organized near the end of the first 
semester of this past year under the supervision of Mr. Derrick. 
To l)e a member of this club, a boy must be a chemistry student 
and have an average of 80. The club meets every other Wednes- 
day at the seventh period. Two boys have charge of the program 
at each meeting. They choose their own experiments, and Mr. 
Derrick helps them carry them out. The object of the club is 
to learn more about Chemistry. 

Mr. Derrick is planning a trip to Savannah with the club. 
They will visit the sugar refinery, oil refinery, and paper mill. 










Mr. Derrick 



"Ik 1940 a A in BOW 



THE BETA CLUB 




The Xational Beta Clul) is a non-serret. leadership org'anization for 
high-school students. Organized in 1933, it has at present a membership of 
o\er fourteen thousand students in over nine hundred chapters. Its objects 
are : to encourage etfort, to promote character, and to stimulate achievement 
among its members. Eligibility for election to membership is based upon 
scholarship and character. The requirements for election to the Richmond 
Club include an honcjr average for three years in the Academy. The local 
chapter Avas installed three years ago and at j/resent includes twenty active 
memliers in addition to the alumni now in the junior College. 



(sitting) 

1. Grover Tyner 

2. Jean Levy 

3. Roscoe LoAvery 

4. David Stevens 

5. Harold Stevens 

6. Henry Carter 

7. Allston Bailie 



Members 

(standing) 

1. X'ance Bullock 

2. James Hill 

3. Jack Stringer 

4. I'rennan Purkall 
3. W'ayland Cato 
6. Hubert King 



Officers 

Harold Engler President 

Hubert King Vice-President 

.Allston Bailie , Secretary 

\'ance Bullock Treasurer 

Dr. J. M. Ellis Faculty Adviser 





t 



^'—•1 ill! 



Hi 
III 



Ml 



i 




Lloyd Stanford, genial Advertising 
Manager of the "Rainbow", starts out 
to close another contract. To him we 
owe credit for most of the ads contained 
in this section, the largest in the his- 
tory of our school. Patronize the 
advertisers, for they have helped make 
this annual possible. 



ciS/ta/^d 





Academy Graduation of 19^9 



Instead of giving the names of the graduates of last year, the Annual Staff 
wishes to utilize this space in grateful dedication to nur friends in the dental 
and medical professions, who have contributed financially to the success of 
the 1940 "Rainbow". 



R. E. Anderson, D.D.S. 
W. E. Clark. D.D.S. 
S. W. Fennell. D.D.S. 
C. T. Hall, D.D.S. 
W. W. Battey, A'l.D. 
J. W. Brittingham, M.D. 
T. P. Brown. M.D. 
R. I. Bryson, M.D. 
A. A. Davidson, M.D. 
T. W. Goodwin. M.D. 
J. D. Gray, M.D. 
H. T. Harper, M.D. 
J. P. Hitchcock, M.D. 
C. M. Kilpatrick, M.D. 
Drs. Lee and Weeks 



R. L. Henry, D.D.S. 

H. W. Hankinson. D.D.S. 

V. L. Maxwell. D.D.S. 

J. S. Plaxco, D.D.S. 

S. J. Lewis. M.D. 

A. E .Maxwell, ALD. 

H. M. Michel. M.D. 

W. A. Mulherin, M.D. 

W. K. Philpot. M.D. 

J. V. Roule. M.D. 

D. M. Silver. M.D. 

Solomon Tanenbaum, M.D. 

George Thurmond, A'T.D. 

C. D. W-dvd. M.D. 

G. \V. Wriiiht. M.D 




"When Words Fail" — Qive 




An Augusta Contribution to the 
World's Fine Things. 





piiOTO-p^ocBS mmm co. 



STREET 



ATLANTA GEORGIA 



THE 



NATIONAL EXCHANGE BANK 



AUGUSTA, GEORGIA 



STRONG, SOUND, PROGRESSIVE 



MEMBER FEDERAL DEPOSIT INSURANCE CORPORATION 





WE'RE ALWAYS BUSY AT 

Dan's Shu Fix 

BECAUSE 

We Use The Best Leather 
Perfect Workmanship 

—TRY US— 

DANIELS SHOE SHOP 

909 Broad Street Dial 2-7545 



COMPLIMENTS OF 

SUNSHINE 
Crispy Crackers 



CLASS OF 1940 — 

We offer you our heartiest congratulations 




Your life has just begun. Many of you will seek higher educational advantages, 
while others of you will begin your life work immediately. Yet, no matter where 
you are, or what type of work you are engaged in, all of you are sure to have a 
home some day. Therefore, whether home to you will mean an apartment for 
two, or simply "a room with a view", we urge you to start the practice early in 
life, of shopping and saving on all personal and home needs, at SEARS, ROE- 
BUCK & COMPANY, "Your Family Store in Augusta". 



tAVI MONIT ON SO.OOO ITIMS IN SIARS CATALOO. USi OU* CATALOG OIDII SIIVICI 

SEARS. ROEBUCK AND CO. 

SIAIt Sill ANTTHINO AND iVIRTTHINO TOTAIINO MO 0» MORI ON THI lASY PATMINT PIAN 



Broad Street at the Monument 



PHONE 2-7575 



Augusta, Georgia 



COMPLIMENTS 



Frank Renick 



Exclusive Men's Wear 



Augusta, Georgia 



Compliments of 

THE QUALITY ^ 

FOR MEN 

CLOTHING, HATS. CAPS. 
FURNISHINGS 

874 BROAD STREET 



Satisfied with Small Profits 



Augusta, Ga 



Compliments of 



McElmurray Sandwich Co. 



POTATO CHIPS 
• CAKES 
• TARTS 



DELICIOUS PASTRIES 
• DOUGHNUTS 
• PIES 



E. W. McELMURRAY, Prop. 

455 Georgia Ave., North Augusta 



Dial 2-5151 



Compliments of 



Bolyard's Barber Shop 



IN 



HOTEL RICHMOND 



Compliments of 



<M'44XjJt Iranian' 6. 



'The Best Brick for 40 Years" 



GEORGIA-CAROLINA BRICK & TILE CO 

AUGUSTA, GEORGIA 



JleAt HAou ^anaet 

Augusta's Leading Industries 

Are Served By Our Presses 

YOU, TOO, 

Can Enjoy This Quality Printing 

At Prices You Can Afford To Pay 

COMMERCIAL PRINTING CO. 

Dial 2-6416—2-6417 Augusta, Ga. 



STATIONERY AND OFFICE SUPPLIES 
OFHCE FURNITURE - STEEL LETTER FILES 
FOUNTAIN PENS - MECHANICAL PENCILS 

12Q Broad St. Augusta, Ga. 

DIAL 2-2122 



/. E. fERRiS & COMPANy 

Under-Grad Clothes 

Fashioned for Youth 

752 Broad Street Augusta, Ga. 



Augusta Spoiting Goods Co. 

ACADEMY AND lUNIOR COLLEGE ATHLETIC WEAR 

Spalding and Goldsmith Athletic Equipment 

GOLF, TENNIS, BASKETBALL AND FOOTBALL SUPPLIES 

Complete Fishing and Hunting Equipment 

210-12 Eighth Street Dial 2-6007 



ALFRED M. BATTEY 

Investment Securities 
REAL ESTATE, INSURANCE 

Southern Finance Building 



Btuld tfoun. luu*i& o*t 


a nook* 




*Character or 

Good Materials 






PERKINS LUMBER CO. 


619- 13th Street 




Dial 2-2429 



AAA HIGHWAY EXPRESS 

Daily SERVICE Between 

Augusta, Athens, Atlanta, Columbus and Greenville, 

S. C. Also Tennessee and Alabama. 

Pickups and Delivery Service at no extra cost 

Dial 2-2231 



miiford's Cleaners 



432-34-36 Eighth 



Dial 2-5775 



'W eiea^ Place, ta Clecat GLtitei.' 



WM. SCHWEIGERT CO. 



846 BROAD STREET 



JEWELRY — GIFTS — NOVELTIES 



Compliments of 

BLANCHARD & CALHOUN 
REALTY COMPANY 

Real Estate, Loans and Insurance 
Johnson Bldg. Augusta, Ga. 



May good luck in the future be 


yours. 


We 


sincerely 


appreciate your 


past 


patronage 1 


and 


are 


looking forward 


to many years | 




of] 


oleasant business 


with 


you. 




Soda 




cMM 






e<^ 


636 Broad St 






Curb Service 



Compliments of 



HENRY CHANCE, JR. 



Attorney at Law 



TEXflCO 
PRODUCTS 



BOflRDmfln OIL compflny 



"fln RLL flUGUSTfl inSTITUTIOn" 



For better values in 


Diamonds, Watches 


and Jewelry visit 


DECKUM & 

Detter 


lONES 
U EWELERS 


M. A. Beckum 


W. C. Jones 


Better Prices, Repairing, Engraving 


COMPLIMENTS 
OF 




^fl#^ 


r^^ 


OvJg^[^ 


Real Estate 
Insurance - Loans 


Phone 2-5571 





GRADUATES 

WE CONGRATULATE YOU! 

MAY YOUR FUTURE LIFE BE 
ONE OF HAPPINESS AND SUCCESS 

SAXON-CULLUM'S 

YOUR SI ORE 



Phone 2-6811 



864 Broad St. 



—I 



MEET THAT TOUGH CLASS 
FEELING FIT 



With an Ice-Cold R. C. Cola you can meet that 
class refreshed. Royal Crown is a delicious, 
wholesome blend that will do wonders in restor- 
ing that lost pep! 



RICHMOND'S CHOICE! 

ROYAL CROWN COLA 




ROYAL CROWN BOTTLING CO. 

DIAL 2-6793 114 6th St. 





Compliments of 


kwelU(IU MiUi 




Aui^A^Aia, Qa, 



SOUTHERN WELDING CO. 

J. A. OUZTS, Prop. 

ELECTRIC and ACETYLENE 
WELDING and CUTTING 

Auto Frames and Axles Aligned Accurately 
with Bear System 



623 Ellis St. 



Phone 2-4981 



Compliments of 



CHEF C. J. WILSON 



CAPTAIN C. R. FOLDS 




N & W CAMERA EXCHANGE 



PHOTO SUPPLIES 



AUTHORIZED DEALER for 



Eastman, Agfa, Argus, Bell & Howell 



The Only Exclusive Camera Shop 



214 8th St. 



DIAL 2-4057 



All photographic supplies for 1940 "RAINBOW 
furnished bv us. 



The Game Is Never Lost When You Eat At 

S & S COFFEE SHOPPE 

"Augusta's Best Place to Eat" 

All Electric and Air-Conditioned 

WESTERN STEAKS 

SEAFOOD A SPECIALTY 



Corner 8th and Ellis Street 



Open All Nite 



Compliments of 



BELK-WHITE CO. 

845 BROAD ST. 
"Remember you safe at Belk-White" 



THE STUDENT'S STORE 



J, C. Penney Co., Inc. 



840 BROAD ST. 



"It Pays to Shop At Penney's" 



MAKE YOUR HOUSE 
YOUR HOME 

THE JONES 

FURNITURE 
COMPANY 

1010 BROAD STREET 

DIAL 2-5331 

Augusta, Georgia 





Compliments 


of 




EPPS 


Furniture 


Company 




1023 Broad St. 


Dial 2-8112 


Augusta, 


Ga. 



HANSBERGER'S DRUG STORE 



DRUGS, TOILET ARTICLES and CANDY 



Broad at Tenth 



Dial 2-5745 



Augusta, Ga. 



"We Invite You to Visit Our New Shop" 

CENTRAL GARDEN FLORIST 

Mr. and Mrs. N. C. Anderson, Props. 
MRS. JAMES GARDINER MISS ANNIE ANDERSON 

Walton Way at Heard Phone y44G4 







"A Penny Saved Is A Penny Earned" 



The Citizens and Southern National Bank 



No Account Too Large . . . None Too Small 



Member 



Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation 



FLINT'S BARBER SHOP 

214 9th Street 

B. L. FLINT, Manager 

We Will Appreciate Your Business 



^>ue*itU Meet At 



''HOME FOLKS" 

Smokes, Lunches, Billiards 
News Stand 



Dial 2-7379 



754 Broad St. 



The Planters Cotton 
Oil Company, Inc. 

Manufacturers of 

Cotton Seed Products 

Augusta, Georgia 



BlILIE FURilTURE CO. 



712 Broad Street 



Augusta, Ga. 



DRINK 




^Delicious and Refreshing^' 



AUGUSTA COCA-COLA BOTTLING CO. 



AUGUSTA, GEORGIA 




Co4fuplune*Ui- oji 



James G. Bailie 



Mrs. Julia A. Gwin 



Compliments of 

FRUITLAND NURSERIES 

The finest of Plants 



THE SOUTHERN 
COTTON OIL CO. 



Manufacturers of 



HIGH GRADE FERTILIZERS 
COTTON SEED PRODUCTS 



Augusta, Georgia 



T/ie duality Group 

for mo 

JlU>icoln-2&^2iufA, 

Walker-DuRant Motor Co., Inc. 



Broad at 14th Streets 



Phone 2-5371 



A. ROY KROUSE 

JEWELER 

C'Xfuzn.t Clock cutd Qi/cUcU R.efuU/U*t(f, 
Located 

Augusta Sporting Goods Co. 
Phone 2-6007 Augusta, Georgia 



DeLiixe Paint & Body Shop 

Fenders and Bodies Repaired 
and Painted 

836 Reynolds St. Augusta, Georgia 

Dial 2-6757 



Compliments of 

C. M. HILL 

SERVICE STATION 

We Specialize in Safety Service 
The Best Equipped Shop in East Georgia 



565 Broad Street 



Dial 2-5751 



973 Broad St. 



Phone 2-2452 



GRAVES FURNITURE 
COMPANY, INC. 

COMPLETE HOUSE FURNISHINGS 

TERMS IF DESIRED 

Augusta, Georgia 



^B^^^^IS Ik^^^^^ 


^^M 


fill 




^^^^^^^V^l^^ ^B 



Compliments of 



CAMPBELL BLDG. 

Offices for Rent 



W. M. HARISON 



DODGE 


PLYMOUTH 






SALES and SERVICE 










STARR SMITH 










MOTOR CO. 










Dial 2-7761 






523 


Broad 


Street 


Augusta, 


Ga. 





MERRY BROTHERS BRICK & TILE COMPANY 

Manufacturers of 

FACE BRICK 

COMMON BRICK 

HOLLOW BUILDING BRICK 

THE SOUTH^S LARGEST - ESTABLISHED 1899 

415 Masonic Bldg. 
AUGUSTA, GA. 



Crystal Ice" 
''Allburn Coal" 
''Supreme Stoker Coal" 

Augusta Ice & 
Coal Company 

100% Home Industry 



Dial 2-7721 



639 13th St. 



feedright Milling Co. 



/liUf^4iia, QeoAXf^ 



With Best Wishes To The 
A.R.C.-J.C.A. CLASSES OF 1940 

Woodward Lumber Co. 

Forty Years of Faithful Service 
Dial 2-4611 Augusta, Ga. 



Compliments of 



BOARD OF COMMISSIONERS 



ROADS AND REVENUES 



Richmond County, Ga. 



Edwin C. Mertins 
James M. Wooddall 



Frank H. Hooper 
Frank R. Miles 



T^ 




CASTLEBERRY'S FOOD CO.. INC. 

AUGUSTA, GEORGIA 




1940 Graduates 

We extend to each of yon 

Congratulations and Best Welshes 

for a future of 

Happiness and Success 



J. B. 



lu^n' 




s 



Collegiate Clothes 



936 Broad St. 



Phone 2-6631 



Compliments of 



JOHN C. HARPER 

Ordinary, Richmond County 



Compliments of 




GENERAL TIRE AND SUPPLY CO. 


"Augusta's Master Service 


Station" 


Broad at 12th Street 


Phone 2-6641 


Hill Branch: Walton Way at 


Baker Ave. 


Phone 3-7377 





SUPERIOR LAUNDRY 



LAUNDRY SERVICE 



DRY CLEANING 



PHONE 2-5511 



Mulherin Lumber Co. 



625 Thirteenth St. 



Phone 2-4996 



"Large enough to satisfy your every Lumber 
need — yet small enough to give you personal 
service. 



Compliments of 

LEE, CONGDON & FULCHER 
ATTORNEYS AT LAW 

Augusta, Georgia 



The None Such Restaurant 


Gus A. 


Smaragdis 




915 BROAD ST. 




AUGUSTA 


Newly 


Remodeled 




Booth, Counter 


and Table Service 


Western Steak 




Sea Foods 



Mill Supplies and Industrial Specialties 



S. Donald Fortson 



1553 Broad St. 



Phone 2-5536 



We Specialize in Home Heating 
Residential and Commercial 
Air-Conditioning 
Oil-O-Matic Burners 

Iron Fireman Stokers 
Westinghouse Oil Company 

PHOENIX OIL CO. 



700 Twiggs St. 



Phone 2-5321 



Diamonds — Watches 
Cash or Credit 



910 BROAD ST. 



PHONE 2-5551 




Compliments of 



HULL BARRETT. WILLINGHAM & TOWILL 



flUGUSTfl HIDE compflny 

DIAL 2-8249 

HIDES - SKINS - TALLOW 
Scrap Iron and Metals 



1433 REYNOLDS ST. 



AUGUSTA, GA. 



Compliments of 

jR. E. Elliott & Sons 

R. ALLEN ELLIOTT LESTER F. ELLIOTT 
S. HERBERT ELLIOTT 



COMPLIMENTS OF 



CiTV Of AUGUSTA 



Photographs in The mO RAINBOW 

SHEMM STUDIO 



^^Po^d/uiUi 0^ ^idtUudiJO^ 



rr 



722 Broad St. 



Dial 2-2315 




STUDENT DRUG STORES 

Visit Any One of Our Convenient Stores 

''There Is One Near You" 





Gardelle's 






702 Broad St. 






Dial 2-6611 




DRUGS 


Lewis & Olive Drug Co. 

1002 Broad St. 
Dial 2-6426 


KODAKS 


CANDY 


King's Way Pharmacy 

2107 Kings Way 
Dial 3-4456 


PERFUMES 


CIGARS 


THE HILL PHARMACY 

1432 Monte Sano Ave. 


FOUNTAIN 


CIGARETTES 


Dial 3-3621 

COLLEGE PHARMACY 

1801 Walton Way 
Dial 3-36S7 


TOILETRIES 



ACCURACY... 

PROMPT SERVICE . . . 

QUAiny RELIABLE... 



Dorr's 

"Good Taste Apparel" 

Clothiers and 
Haberdashers 



724 Broad St. 



Augusta, Ga. 



Compliments of 

SIKES COAL & WOOD COMPANY 

OUR COALS AND COKE ARE 
CRAZY WITH THE HEAT 



1498 Wrightsboro Road 



Dial 3-362G 



THOMAS P. DORIS 



IS J 




^s^ 




Certified Watclimaker 

HOROLOGICALlNSTITUTE-OF-AMERieA 

WASHINGTON D- 



OIPVDICHT HQOOLDUCAL IMSTiTUTl OF AUEAlU 1^2^ 



9131/2 BROAD STREET 
AUGUSTA. GEORGIA 
ACCURATE TIME PIECES 

DIAL 2-2972 



SPECIALIZING IN ALL TYPES OF REPAIR WORK 



EDWARD I.DORIS 

TORE 

DIAMONDS 

WATCHES 

CLOCKS 

SILVERWARE 

CRYSTALS 

JEWELRY 




Compliments of 



AUGUSTA AMUSEMENT CO 



MILLER THEATRE 



THE SOUTHS MOST BEAUTIFUL AND MODERN 



IMPERIAL — MODJESKA — RIALTO 



and DREAMLAND THEATRES 







STARK - EMPIRE 










LEE BLUM, Owner 








LAUNDRY 


CLEANING 


DYE/NG 




PLANT 


DRUID PARK AVE. 


— DIAL 3-3611 BRANCH 743 

AUGUSTA, GA. 


BROAD ST. — DIAL 


2-4733 



Compliments of 

FIRR'S 

CLOTIIIM^ 

STUDENT CLOTHES OUR 
SPECIALTY 

Dial 2-7002 833 Broad St. 



Ga*ftpXl4>Ke4nii (U 



A44Xf44Aia ^al^ie4. 9nc. 



Sanitation Is the First Thing in Health 

Brown & Williamson^ s 

Sanitary Barber Shop 
CORNER 8th & BROAD STREETS 

We Will Appreciate Your Patronage 



Compliments of 

JOSEPH E. BR^SON 

Judge of the Municipal Court 

of the 

City of Augusta 



BUSY BEE CAFE 

"CflcUii Place Ut 1auA*t" 

WESTERN STEAKS OF ALL KINDS 

Very Best of Foods Served 

Newly Remodeled 

658 Broad Street Dial 2-625G 



Bicycles - Motorcycles - Pennzoil 



R. L Sutnerau 



1248 Broad St. 



Dial 2-5301 




Compliments of 

GEORGIA HARDWOOD 
LUMBER CO. 

Manufacturers and Exporters 

S. F. C. Building 
DIAL 2-5317 



H. B. Martin Grocery 



Plate Lunches - Sandwiches 



802 Fenwick St. 



Dial 2-9281 



S. Men Cohen 

Lije - Fire - Casualty Insurance 
Lloyd A. Stanford 

Dial 2-7787 317 S. F. C. BIdg. 



w. 


C. IVEY COAL CO. 




COAL 


-COKE 


- STOKER COAL 




Dial 2-8218 




Augusta, 


Ga. 



STANDARD PAPER CO. 


"WHOLESALE PAPER" 


628 SEVENTH ST. 


Augusta, Georgia 



Compliments of 



AUGUSTA ROOHNG & METAL WORKS 



Everything in Roofing and Sheet Metal Work 



623-G25 Reynolds Street 



Dial 2-2318 



©urny's 


Shoe Store 




Headquarters for Academy Drill Shoes 




912 Broad St. 


Augusta, 


Ga. 



Enjoy Drinking 

RED ROCK 
COLA 



Umi TRICK CO. 

Augusta, Ga. 
Phone 3-6271 



PEE GEE 




ESTATE 


PAINTS 


JERRIGfln HflRDUJRRE CO' 


HEATROLAS 


BUILDERS 


WHOLESALE and RETAIL 


KITCHEN 


HARDWARE 


HARDWARE :: STOVES :: PAINTS 


UTENSILS 


MAJESTIC 


1033-39 Broad St. Phone 2-6818 


WOODWORKING 


RANGES 




MACHINERY 




partridge 3nn 



BARBER SALON 



Compliments Of 



Harley's Grocery 



Benson's for 



service 



Dial 2-4748 — 2-8887 
Gas - Oil - Tires - Batteries 



836 Ellis 



Broad & 13th Street' 



We Specialize in 

Lubricating, Washing and Polishing 

TIRE REPAIRING 

POWELL'S "SERVICE" STATION 

WALTON WAY and BEMAN ST. 

DIAL 3-7037 
L D. POWELL, Prop. Augusta, Ga. 



Compliments of 



Maxwell Hardware Company 



865 BROAD STREET 
AUGUSTA, GA. 



VYCdLTtin Clothing Co. 



Better Clothes for Less Money 



982 Broad Street 



BOWEN BROS. 
HARDWARE CO. 

Sporting Goods Headquarters 

BASEBALL FOOTBALL 

BASKETBALL and TENNIS 

SUPPLIES 

905 BROAD STREET 



SHERMAN 

AND 

HEMSTREET 

INC. 

Realtors 
AUGUSTA, GA. 



INTERSTATE 
COFFEE CO. 

AUGUSTA'S FASTEST GROWING 
COFFEE ROASTING PLANT 

Over a Million Pounds Roasted Annually 

AUGUSTA, GEORGIA 




WASH AT 



HULSE LAUNDRY 



"JUST A QOOD ONE'' 



3-4451 



PHONES - - ' 2-2460 



LAUNDRY 



DRY CLEANING 



United States Government Bonds 

Georgia and South Carolina Municipals 
Local and General Market Securities 

Johnson, Lane, Space & Company Inc. 

733 BROAD ST. TELEPHONE 2-7741 

INVESTMENT SECURITIES 

AUGUSTA - ATLANTA - SAVANNAH 



1848 



1940 



/. Willie Levy Co., Inc. 

756 BROAD ST. 

STYLE QUARTERS FOR HIGH SCHOOL 

AND COLLEGE BOYS FOR 

NEARLY 95 YEARS 



TREAT YOURSELF TO THE BEST 



C/ary's Sanitary Barber Shop 



S. F. C. Bldg. Lobby 



Augusta, Ga. 



21/2% INTEREST 



Paid on Saving Accounts — 
Deposits Insured 



wm mmi m\ 



Wll Broad St. 



Phone 2-8815 



TOWN TAVERN 

Bioad near Seventh Street 

— Specializing In — 

STEAKS AND CHOPS 

SEAFOODS 



24 Hour Service 



Phone 2-2327 



HOT.T.EMAN-MILLER CO. 


Office Supplies and 


Equipment 


AUGUSTA, GEORGIA 




Shop in Comfort 



SILIER'S 



STORE AIR-CONDITIONED 



Meredith Optical Co. 

optical Service That Satisfies 



Dr. A. H. Meredith 
Optometrist 

740 Broad St. 



Dr. R. W. Roper 
Optometrist 

Phone 2-2480 



FOR COMPLETE NEWS READ 



THE AUGUSTA HERALD 

DAILY EVENING SUNDAY MORNING 

"Evening Hours Are Reading Hours" 



A. COHEN 


/^^ 








L. I. COHEN 


978 1 
Broad 


1 


% 


(i 


X 


J/'^ Phone 

'^f 2-7985 


i 




TERl 


FOR 


YOUl 


BOYJ 


Exclusi 


■e Outfi 


tiers 


for 


Students and Boys 



Reliable Trucking Co., Inc. 



DAILY FREIGHT SERVICE 



Augusta 



Atlanta 



RlnJz* 



e^ 



PAINT AND GLASS COMPANY 

869 Broad Street 
Augusta, Ga. 



Your 




/i^ 




Pontiac 




(n 




Dealer 




vff>^ 


k 




PONTIAC 


MASTER 






AUTO SERVICE 






Exclusive Sales 


and Service 




944 Ellis St 




Phone 


2-8841 



Compliments of 



THE AUGUSTA BASEBALL CLUB 



VYCargaret Lotz 
Specialty Shop 

DIAL 2-5937 
827 Greene St. Augusta, Ga. 



Compliments of 

McElmurray- Phillips Furniture Company 

Furniture that Endures 

923 Broad Street Dial 2-4787 



Compliments of 

Stephen's Barber Shop 

217 7th Street 



Compliments of 



Sturgis Service Station 



7th & Ellis Streets 



KEEL'S SERVICE STATM 



1924 Walton Way 



Dial 3-9194 



Compliments of 

DeLuxe Cleaners 

C. F. Hightower, Prop. 
315 8th Street Dial 2-4325 



LOCKHART, McAULIFFE & CO. 

(Incorporated) 

Real Estate, Fire and Casualty Insurance, 
Surety Bonds 

807 BROAD ST. 



Compliments of 

LEAGUE DUVALL <& POWELL 

Real Estate and General Insurance 
AUGUSTA, GEORGIA 



HER DRESS IS NOT COMPLETE 



WITHOUT A 



CORSAGE 



from 



cMa^LUui ^loAld 



METCALF AT WALTON WAY 



Dial 3-4406 



The victories of life are won, not on the fields where the decisive struggles take place, but 
in the obscure and forgotten hours of preparation. 



GEORGIA RAILROAD BANK and 



TRUST COMPANY 



Member Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation 



Main Office 
701 BROAD STREET 



Uptown Branch 
1109 BROAD STREET 



City Tailoring Company 

JOHN ALFIERI, Prop. 

Experienced Custom Tailors and Designers 
Ail Work Cut, Fitted, and Made in Augusta 



408 Jackson St. 



Dial 2-6167 



AUGUSTA, GA. 



Compliments of 


S. H. KRESS & MPMY 


5c-10c-25c STORE 


834 Broad Street Augusta, Ga. 



Willingham Automobile Finance Corporation 



Broad at Eighth Street 



Augusta, Georgia 




Compliments of 



dStatSScDS 

Bread & Cake 



DIAL 2-6881 



AUGUSTA, GA. 



Compliments of 



//Or£l RICHMOHd 

G. D. Hardy, Mgr. 



W. R. DAWSON & CO. 



H. BURTS TAYLOR. Mgr. 



118 8th Street 



Augusta, Ga. 



OUR COVER 
By 

American Beauty Cover Co, 

DALLAS, TEXAS 



Compliments Of 



The Augusta Chronicle 



THE SOUTH'S OLDEST 
DIAL 2-6464 



Compliments of 

Walgreen'^s 

Whatever You Need in 

DRUGS AND SUNDRIES 

At Lower Prices 

Prescriptions Filled and Delivered 

DIAL 2-7177 



Compliments of 

Frank Goldberg 



1054 Broad St. 



Dial 2-6491 



COMPLIMENTS OF 

R. C. PAULK, ASST SUPT. A&P FOOD STORES 

H. B. DUPREE, MGR. A&P SUPER MARKET 
1025 GREEN ST. 

S. C. READ, MGR. A&P SUPER MARKET 
2111 KINGS WAY 



Compliments of 

HERNDON 

CAFE - SODA 

"Where Friends Meet" 

837 BROAD ST. -:- PHONE 2-5339 



Compliments of 

Valley Coaches 

Augusta, Ga. 



Compliments of 

SHORT ORDERS 
SANDWICHES 



Dial 2-9309 



506 Broad St. 



FRMK ll]S™ 

ilWD HIS ORCHESTRA 



Compliments of 

FRIEDMAN'S JEWELERS 

826 Broad St. . . . Augusta, Ga. 

South's Greatest Credit Jewelers 
Diamonds - Watches - Silverware 

Radios 
Optical Department in All Stores 

DIAL 2-6861 



Office: 209 Tenth St. 
Dial 2-2066 



Plant: 608 Broad St. 
Dial 2-8926 



CENTRAL CLEANING 
AND PRESSING CO. 

E. M. CROZIER, Prop. 

"Where Good Cleaning is Not Expensive" 



McDONALD^S 

42 YEARS ESTABLISHED 



DIAL 3-4481 



JUNIOR COLLEGE & ACADEMY 
SENIOR RINGS and PINS 



Furnished by 

We Also Have a Complete Line of 

DIPLOMAS -- INVITATIONS -- CARDS 

CAPS & GOWNS - - PROPHIES - - CUTS - - MEDALS 



H. S. Cdnfield, Georgia Rep. 



1560 No. Decatur Rd., Atlanta 



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